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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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May 22nd, 1639 AD (search for this): chapter 11
of fish on the Bank were expected to take them thence to London. Sept. 3, 1635, the General Court chose a committee of six for setting forward and managing a fishing trade. That fishing was profitable, we have the following early record: Thirty-five ships sailed this year (1622) from the west of England, and two from London, to fish on the New England coasts; and made profitable voyages. Through the instrumentality of our fishing interest, the General Court passed the following order. May 22, 1639: For further encouragement of men to set upon fishing, it is ordered, that such ships and vessels and other stock as shall be properly employed and adventured in taking, making, and transporting of fish according to the course of fishing voyages, and the fish itself, shall be exempt, for seven years from henceforth, from all country charges. To show how minute was the fostering care of our fathers on this point, we have the following order of June 2, 1641: It is ordered that fishermen sh
eneral Court ordered that the company's joint stock shall have the trade of beaver and all other furs in those parts, solely, for the term of seven years from this day. May 18, 1631: It is ordered that every plantation within the limits of this patent shall, before the last day of June next, provide common weights and measures, which shall be made by some which the governor hath already sealed, and by which also all others that will have weights and measures of their own are to be made. 1635: Voted that beaver-skins shall pass for ten shillings per pound. Sept. 6, 1638: Mr. Cradock's accounts were audited in Boston. Mr. Cradock's large outlay here, for all the accommodations requisite in building schooners and carrying on an extensive fishing business, made this region a trading centre. This first state of things continued till the withdrawal of Mr. Cradock's property, a few years after his death. The fishing business had been unsuccessful, and no one would continue it. T
fishing business continued for fifteen or twenty years, but with less and less profit to Mr. Cradock. It was finally abandoned as a failure; and afterwards the river-fishing alone claimed attention. May, 1639: The price of alewives in Medford, at this time, was five shillings per thousand. This made food incredibly cheap. That Mystic River, as a resort for fish, was early known and greatly valued, appears from many testimonies. In Josselyn's account of his two voyages to New England (1638) we have the following record: The river Mistick runs through the right side of the town (Charlestown), and, by its near approach to Charles River in one place, makes a very narrow neck, where stands most part of the town. The market-place, not far from the water-side, is surrounded with houses. In Mystic River were bass, shad, alewives, frost-fish, and smelts. Josselyn says, We will return to Charlestown again, where the river Mistick runs on the north side of the town (that is, the right
em can be found in the records of the Custom House at Boston, or in those of the Secretary of the Navy at Washington. This business of ship-building, beginning in 1631, and increasing annually for several years, required many men, who required houses and food within the town. The origin of the name of schooners is thus given ie presume that the seine, being a net sent to fish with, was the first seine ever drawn in its waters, and the first drawn on this continent. This was probably in 1631; and the first draught was doubtless an event of liveliest interest, of raw wonder, and exceeding joy. If any web or filament of that pioneer seine had come down tmplete history of the fishing establishment he maintained here, and probably a comparative estimate of sea and river fishing. The introduction of the drag-net, in 1631, when Mystic River was full of fish, was an example that would be followed more and more, as proper seines could be knit and easy markets secured. The narrowness
tally curtailed. The bricks were carted to Boston at great cost, which gave the yards in Charlestown an advantage over ours. If they were taken in lighters, by the river, this did not much lessen the expenses of transportation, but increased the risks of fracture. The high price of labor, of wood, and of cartage, rendered competition unwise; and the manufacture of bricks has ceased. Ship-building. Governor Winthrop sailed from Cowes, in England, on Thursday, April 8, 1630. On Saturday, June 12, he reached Boston Bay; and, on the 17th of that month, he makes the following record: Went up Mistick River about six miles. To this heroic and Christian adventurer belongs the honor of building the first vessel whose keel was laid in this part of the Western World; and that vessel was built on the bank of Mystic River, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. There is a tradition that it was built on the north shore of the river, and therefore within the limit
March 26th, 1761 AD (search for this): chapter 11
irst. Bricks were made on Colonel Royal's estate. Clay deposits were found between his mansion-house and the river. A most extensive and profitable business was carried on in these yards for many years. At a later date, say 1750, bricks were made on land directly north of Dr. Tufts's house. The steep bank now in front of Mr. George W. Porter's house marks the place. This land, called Brick-yard Pasture, was owned by Rev. Matthew Byles, of Boston, and sold by him to Dr. Simon Tufts, March 26, 1761. Nov. 14, 1774, the town passed the following vote: That this town does disapprove of any bricks being carried to Boston till the committees of the neighboring towns shall consent to it. In 1785, Stephen Hall willed the brick-yards now in the occupation of Thomas Bradshaw, and Samuel Tufts, jun. About this time, Captain Caleb Blanchard and his brother Simon made bricks in a yard near Mr. Cradock's house, in the eastern part of the town; and afterwards in a yard on land opposite th
ark, being of thirty tons, went to sea. It cost one hundred and forty-five pounds. The owner said of it, May 16, 1636, I will sell her for one hundred and sixty pounds. There was something singularly prophetic in the fact that the first vessel built at Mistick should have so increased in price after five years of service. Our day has seen the prophecy fulfilled; as it is no marvel now for a Medford ship to command a higher price after having had a fair trial at sea. The second year (1632) witnessed another vessel built by Mr. Cradock on the bank of the Mystic, whose register was a hundred tons. In 1633, a ship of two hundred tons was built; and another, named Rebecca, tonnage unknown: both built by Mr. Cradock. Mr. William Wood, in 1633, writes: Mr. Cradock is here at charges of building ships. The last year, one was upon the stocks of a hundred tons: that being finished, they are to build twice her burden. There is reason to believe that Mr. Cradock's ship-yard was that n
had a fair trial at sea. The second year (1632) witnessed another vessel built by Mr. Cradock on the bank of the Mystic, whose register was a hundred tons. In 1633, a ship of two hundred tons was built; and another, named Rebecca, tonnage unknown: both built by Mr. Cradock. Mr. William Wood, in 1633, writes: Mr. Cradock is he1633, writes: Mr. Cradock is here at charges of building ships. The last year, one was upon the stocks of a hundred tons: that being finished, they are to build twice her burden. There is reason to believe that Mr. Cradock's ship-yard was that now occupied by Mr. J. T. Foster. That large vessels could float in the river had been proved by the governor, whoy so far abounded in that part of the river which is now between our turnpike river-wall and Malden Bridge that they obstructed navigation. Mr. Wood, speaking, in 1633, of these hinderances, has these words: Ships, without either ballast or lading, may float down this (Mystic) river; otherwise, the oyster-bank would hinder them,
LaphamJ. S. Coolidge & Co.Boston1300 511 ShipEmmaJ. T. Foster'sJ. T. FosterJ. WellsmanCharleston, S. C.875 512 ShipAsterionJ. T. Foster'sJ. T. FosterDavid SnowBoston1170 513 Ship J. T. Foster'sJ. T. Foster(Not sold) 1300 Correct Grand Total, at $5 per ton: 232,206 tons, $10,449,270. Fisheries. To Medford belongs the honor of establishing the first fisheries in London's plantation of Massachusetts Bay. Careful and costly preparations for this business were made in England, in 1629, by Mr. Cradock, who believed it the most promising investment then offered from the New World. In the company's first general letter, under date of April 17, 1629, is indicated a course of trade which was to be pursued by the Medford fishermen. It is thus:-- We have sent five weigh of salt in the Whelpe, and ten weigh in the Talbot. If there be scallops to be had to fish withal, and the season of the year fit, pray let the fishermen (of which we send six from Dorchester), together with
artments, have excellent reputation, and much property. Brick-making. The large deposits of valuable clay within the town of Medford early directed the attention of the enterprising inhabitants to the manufacture of bricks; and those made in 1630 for Mr. Cradock's house were the first. Bricks were made on Colonel Royal's estate. Clay deposits were found between his mansion-house and the river. A most extensive and profitable business was carried on in these yards for many years. At a ler of age. Messrs. William Tufts, Thomas Bradshaw, Hutchinson Tufts, Benjamin Tufts, and Sylvanus Blanchard were the manufacturers in that locality. These yards have been discontinued within our day. Yards near the Cradock house were opened in 1630. Mr. Francis Shedd occupied them in 1700. Sodom-yards. --As the familiar and improper sobriquet of Sodom was early given to that part of Medford which lies south of the river, the brick-yards, opened by the brothers Isaac, Jonathan, and Ebeneze
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