hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) 1,971 3 Browse Search
Thatcher Magoun 602 2 Browse Search
Galen James 450 0 Browse Search
P. Sprague 380 0 Browse Search
Charlestown, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) 369 1 Browse Search
Mathew Cradock 276 10 Browse Search
Sarah Elizabeth 268 0 Browse Search
James O. Curtis 238 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 230 0 Browse Search
Samuel Lapham 172 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

Found 496 total hits in 220 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ped for sea. My orders are to you, that you embrace the first favorable opportunity of wind and weather, and proceed to the coast of Africa; touching first, if you think proper, at Senegal, where, if you find encouragement, you may part with such part of your cargo as you can sell to your liking, and then proceed down the coast to such ports or places as you judge best to dispose of your cargo to advantage, so as to purchase a cargo of two hundred slaves, with which you are to proceed to South Carolina, unless a peace should happen, or a good opportunity of coming off with a man-of-war, or some vessel of force, for the West Indies. In that. case, I would recommend the Island of St. Christopher's, being handy to St. Eustatia's, for the sale of your slaves. Buy no girls, and few women; but buy prime boys and young men. As you have had often the care of slaves, so I think it needless to say much upon that head in regard to keeping them well secured and a constant watch over them. Yo
Draco (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ness concerning Walter Palmer. This Thomas Fox was fined four times, and seems to have been possessed by the very demon of mischief. He left the plantation without his benediction. June 14, 1631: At this court, one Philip Radcliff, a servant of Mr. Cradock, being convict, ore tenus, of most foul, scandalous invectives against our churches and government, was censured to be whipped, lose his ears, and be banished the plantation,--which was presently executed. This sentence, so worthy of Draco, convinces us that some of the early judges in the colony were men who had baptized their passions with the name of holiness, and then felt that they had a right to murder humanity in the name of God. June 5, 1638: John Smyth, of Meadford, for swearing, being penitent, was set in the bilboes. Oct. 4, 1638: Henry Collins is fined five shillings for not appearing when he was called to serve upon the grand jury. Sept. 3, 1639: Nicholas Davison (Mr. Cradock's agent), for swearing an oat
Antigua (Antigua and Barbuda) (search for this): chapter 13
ch of them, in 1694, was assessed twelve-pence; from 1700 to 1719, as personal estate; 1727, each male fifteen pounds, and each female ten pounds; from 1731 to 1775, as personal property. In 1701, the inhabitants of Boston gave the following magnanimous direction: The representatives are desired to promote the encouraging the bringing of white servants, and to put a period to negroes being slaves. Colonel Royal (Dec. 7, 1737) petitions the General Court, that, having lately arrived from Antigua, he has with him several slaves for his own use, and not to sell, and therefore prays that the duty on them be remitted. The duty was four pounds a head. This petition was laid on the table, and rests there yet. In 1781, a final blow was given to slavery in Massachusetts; and in this the inhabitants of Medford unanimously rejoiced. To show how anxious our fathers were to prevent all abuse of an existing custom, the town passed the following vote, Aug. 4, 1718: Voted that every inhabitant
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
several slaves for his own use, and not to sell, and therefore prays that the duty on them be remitted. The duty was four pounds a head. This petition was laid on the table, and rests there yet. In 1781, a final blow was given to slavery in Massachusetts; and in this the inhabitants of Medford unanimously rejoiced. To show how anxious our fathers were to prevent all abuse of an existing custom, the town passed the following vote, Aug. 4, 1718: Voted that every inhabitant of this town (Medfore as many (one hundred and twenty) Scots brought hither and sold for servants in time of the war with England, and most now married and living here, and about half so many Irish brought hither at several times as servants. Judge Sewall, of Massachusetts, June 22, 1716, says, I essayed to prevent negroes and Indians being rated with horses and cattle, but could not succeed. No cargoes of slaves were brought into Medford; but how many cargoes of Medford rum went to Africa and the West Indie
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ots brought hither and sold for servants in time of the war with England, and most now married and living here, and about half so many Irish brought hither at several times as servants. Judge Sewall, of Massachusetts, June 22, 1716, says, I essayed to prevent negroes and Indians being rated with horses and cattle, but could not succeed. No cargoes of slaves were brought into Medford; but how many cargoes of Medford rum went to Africa and the West Indies, and were returned in slaves to Carolina or Rhode Island, we cannot say. The gentlemen of Medford have always disclaimed any participation in the slave-trade. The following extract from a letter, dated Boston, 14th January, 1759, may show what was done at that time. It is as follows :-- Captain William Ellery. Sir,--The Snow Caesar is fully loaded and equipped for sea. My orders are to you, that you embrace the first favorable opportunity of wind and weather, and proceed to the coast of Africa; touching first, if you t
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ther and sold for servants in time of the war with England, and most now married and living here, and about half so many Irish brought hither at several times as servants. Judge Sewall, of Massachusetts, June 22, 1716, says, I essayed to prevent negroes and Indians being rated with horses and cattle, but could not succeed. No cargoes of slaves were brought into Medford; but how many cargoes of Medford rum went to Africa and the West Indies, and were returned in slaves to Carolina or Rhode Island, we cannot say. The gentlemen of Medford have always disclaimed any participation in the slave-trade. The following extract from a letter, dated Boston, 14th January, 1759, may show what was done at that time. It is as follows :-- Captain William Ellery. Sir,--The Snow Caesar is fully loaded and equipped for sea. My orders are to you, that you embrace the first favorable opportunity of wind and weather, and proceed to the coast of Africa; touching first, if you think proper, a
Jamaica, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
r naked body, by any freeholder of the town, and be carried to their respective masters; and said master shall be obliged to pay the sum of 2s. 6d. in money to said person that shall so do. This vote, we presume, must have been imported from Jamaica. Did our progenitors so learn Christ? 1680: There are as many (one hundred and twenty) Scots brought hither and sold for servants in time of the war with England, and most now married and living here, and about half so many Irish brought hitwith wishing you health, success, and happiness, your assured friend and owner, * * One article of the outward cargo stands on the account thus: Eighty-two barrels, six hogsheads, and six tierces of New England rum; thirty-three barrels best Jamaica spirits; thirty-three barrels of Barbadoes rum; twenty-five pair pistols; two casks musket-ball; one chest of hand-arms; twenty-five cutlasses. The return cargo is recorded thus: In the hole, on board of the Snow Caesar, one hundred and fifty
Barbados (Barbados) (search for this): chapter 13
n in for; having proved some to hold out more than the gauge. As you have guns and men, I doubt not you'll make a good use of them if required. Bring some of the slaves this way, if not too late. I am, with wishing you health, success, and happiness, your assured friend and owner, * * One article of the outward cargo stands on the account thus: Eighty-two barrels, six hogsheads, and six tierces of New England rum; thirty-three barrels best Jamaica spirits; thirty-three barrels of Barbadoes rum; twenty-five pair pistols; two casks musket-ball; one chest of hand-arms; twenty-five cutlasses. The return cargo is recorded thus: In the hole, on board of the Snow Caesar, one hundred and fifty-three adult slaves, and two children. The following is a fair specimen of the captain's running-account, in his purchase of slaves, while on the coast of Africa, copied by us from the original manuscript:-- Dr.The natives of AnnamboePer contra,Cr. 1770. gals.1770. gals. April 2
Charlestown, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ith reference to the prevalence of smallpox in Medford, we find the following vote: That a fence and gate be erected across the main country road, and a smokehouse also erected near Medford great bridge, and another smokehouse at the West End, and guards be kept. In 1775, a smokehouse was opened for the purification of those persons who had been exposed to the contagion of smallpox. It stood on the west side of Main Street, about forty rods south of Colonel Royal's house. Visitors from Charlestown were unceremoniously stopped and smoked. 1775: During this and some following years, there was fatal sickness in Medford from dysentery. Out of fifty-six deaths in 1775, twenty-three were children. In 1776, there were thirty-three deaths; in 1777, nineteen; in 1778, thirty-seven; and in 1779, thirteen. No reason is given for these differences in numbers. Out of the thirty-seven deaths of 1778, eighteen were by dysentery, and twenty were children. Whooping-cough has, at certain tim
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
elling the story, never liking to be dragged into court. Redress by law was vainly attempted by the master. The case was tried, first at Cambridge, in the Court of Common Pleas, and then by appeal, at Concord; large numbers of witnesses being summoned from Medford. Caesar worked at his trade in Medford several years with great approbation, and afterwards removed to Woburn, where he married again, and was called Mr. Anderson. He died in middle-age. Medford was the first town in the United States that rescued a fugitive slave. The antislavery movement of our day is one of the most prominent and effectual agencies ever witnessed. It has waked up the nation to the injustice and moral evil of involuntary bondage; and Medford has its full share of intelligent, persevering, and Christian opposers of the slave-system. Advocates of the system we have none. The Rev. John Pierpont and the Rev. Caleb Stetson early became devoted and able lecturers in the field; and, if a fugitive slave
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...