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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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irst opportunity to bear witness against the heinous and crying sin of man-stealing, as also to prescribe such timely redress for what is past, and such a law for the future, as may sufficiently deter all others belonging to us to have to do in such vile and most odious courses, justly abhorred of all good and just men, do order, that the negro interpreter, with others unlawfully taken, be, by the first opportunity (at the charge of the country for the present), sent to his native country of Guinea, and a letter with him of the indignation of the court thereabouts, and justice thereof, desiring our honored governor would please put this order into execution. May 29, 1644: Slaves took the name of their first master. John Gore is granted leave to set his servant, Thomas Reeves, free. Respecting taxes on black servants, we have the subsequent items: Each of them, in 1694, was assessed twelve-pence; from 1700 to 1719, as personal estate; 1727, each male fifteen pounds, and each fem
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
2 doz. of snuff1oz.May 5.By 1 old man for a Lingister3oz. 0.   ----3oz. 0.    How will the above read in the capital of Liberia two hundred years hence? In 1754, there were in Medford twenty-seven male and seven female slaves, and fifteen free blacks; total, forty-nine. In 1764, there were forty-nine free blacks. When the law freed all the slaves, many in Medford chose to remain with their masters; and they were faithful unto death. List of slaves, and their owners' names. Worcester,owned byRev. E. Turell. PompeyDr. Simon Tufts. RoseCaptain Thomas Brooks. PompCaptain Thomas Brooks. PeterCaptain Francis Whitmore. LondonSimon Bradshaw. SelbyDeacon Benjamin Willis. PrinceBenjamin Hall. PunchWidow Brooks. FloraStephen Hall. RichardHugh Floyd. DinahCaptain Kent. CaesarMr. Brown. ScipioMr. Pool. PeterSquire Hall. NiceSquire Hall. CuffeeStephen Greenleaf. IsaacJoseph Tufts. AaronHenry Gardner. Chloe-------- Negro girlMr. Boylston. Negro womanDr. Brooks.
d fifteen free blacks; total, forty-nine. In 1764, there were forty-nine free blacks. When the law freed all the slaves, many in Medford chose to remain with their masters; and they were faithful unto death. List of slaves, and their owners' names. Worcester,owned byRev. E. Turell. PompeyDr. Simon Tufts. RoseCaptain Thomas Brooks. PompCaptain Thomas Brooks. PeterCaptain Francis Whitmore. LondonSimon Bradshaw. SelbyDeacon Benjamin Willis. PrinceBenjamin Hall. PunchWidow Brooks. FloraStephen Hall. RichardHugh Floyd. DinahCaptain Kent. CaesarMr. Brown. ScipioMr. Pool. PeterSquire Hall. NiceSquire Hall. CuffeeStephen Greenleaf. IsaacJoseph Tufts. AaronHenry Gardner. Chloe-------- Negro girlMr. Boylston. Negro womanDr. Brooks. Joseph, Plato, PhebeIsaac Royal. Peter, Abraham, CooperIsaac Royal. Stephy, George, HagarIsaac Royal. Mira, Nancy, BetseyIsaac Royal. We are indebted to a friend for the following: It may be interesting here to mention a circumstan
Henry Collins (search for this): chapter 13
against our churches and government, was censured to be whipped, lose his ears, and be banished the plantation,--which was presently executed. This sentence, so worthy of Draco, convinces us that some of the early judges in the colony were men who had baptized their passions with the name of holiness, and then felt that they had a right to murder humanity in the name of God. June 5, 1638: John Smyth, of Meadford, for swearing, being penitent, was set in the bilboes. Oct. 4, 1638: Henry Collins is fined five shillings for not appearing when he was called to serve upon the grand jury. Sept. 3, 1639: Nicholas Davison (Mr. Cradock's agent), for swearing an oath, was ordered to pay one pound; which he consented unto. Nov. 14, 1644: The General Court order that all Baptists shall be banished, if they defend their doctrine. Nov. 4, 1646: The General Court decree that the blasphemer shall be put to death. May 26, 1647: Roman Catholic priests and Jesuits are forbidden to en
Josiah Symmes (search for this): chapter 13
In 1795, ten children and three adults died of it between the 20th of August and the 1st of November. Apoplexy seems to have destroyed very few lives. During the first fifteen years of Dr. Osgood's ministry, only one case occurred! Oct. 15, 1778: The town voted to procure a house for those patients who had the smallpox. No disease appeared to excite so quick and sharp an alarm as this. The early modes of treatment gave ample warrant for any fears. In 1792, the town voted that Mr. Josiah Symmes's house is the only one authorized as a hospital for inoculation. At this house, many, both male and female, whom we have known, have told us that the patients there were numerous, young, and not very sick; and that the hilarity and frolic of the convalescents exceeded all bounds. There was one disorder not uncommon among our early settlers and their descendants: it was dropsy; and we opine that over-doses of cider may have been the cause. Cider did not produce intoxication; but i
Jeremiah Gilson (search for this): chapter 13
or, from Feb. 15, 1854, to Feb. 15, 1855, was $3,571.86! Tornado. Medford bears its suffering testimony to the effects of the terrible tornado of Aug. 22, 1851. Such extensive destruction of property from such a cause has never before been witnessed in this State. At a meeting of citizens, Aug. 28, the following votes were passed:-- Voted that a committee of five be appointed to appraise damages. Voted that Gorham Brooks, Charles Caldwell, Franklin Patch, Albert Smith, and Jeremiah Gilson, constitute the committee. Voted that the committee be instructed to consider the circumstances of the sufferers, and report cases (if any) where charity is deemed necessary. Voted that the committee be authorized to communicate with similar committees from other towns, in relation to the publication of the results of their investigations. Voted that Rev. Charles Brooks be a committee to collect and arrange the facts in reference to science. Report of Committee of apprais
Leonard Bucknam (search for this): chapter 13
ng to T. P. Smith and others, $4,320; the other was for the Rev. Mr. Haskins, $1,4505,770 House building by J. F. Edward, on property belonging to T. P. Smith and others12 Boston and Lowell Railroad Company — Freight car blown from track, and buildings injured40 J. M. Usher — Buildings, $442; fruit-trees, $30; fruit; ornamental tree (horse-chestnut), $50522 L. B. Usher — Buildings, $50; fruit-trees and fruit, $58; ornamental trees (elm in road, and horse-chestnut), $100208 Heirs of Leonard Bucknam — Buildings and fences, $450; fruit-trees, $25475 J. M. Sanford — Fence, $10; vegetables, $5; furniture and clothing, $150 ;. carriages, $75$240 H. T. Nutter — Vegetables, $5; furniture and clothing, $400405 Joseph Wyatt — Buildings, $250; fruit-trees, $150; fruit, $10410 Town of Medford — Buildings (school and poorhouse fences, &c.), $410; ornamental trees, $50; fruit-trees, $50510 George E. Harrington — Buildings, $30; fruit-trees, $50; fruit, $888 J. Vreeland — Fru
Nathan Wait (search for this): chapter 13
m, and lodge him on board the vessel which was to convey both of them home. Caesar, however, had a trusty friend in Mr. Nathan Wait, the blacksmith, who had promised in no extremity to desert him; and as the chaise reached Medford Bridge, upon the edge of which stood Mr. Wait's smithy, he roared so lustily that Mr. Wait sprang out of his shop, hot from the anvil, and, standing before the horse, sternly forbade the driver from carrying a free man into slavery. Being ordered to mind his own busMr. Wait sprang out of his shop, hot from the anvil, and, standing before the horse, sternly forbade the driver from carrying a free man into slavery. Being ordered to mind his own business, he indignantly shook his fist at Mr. Ingraham, and retorted, that he would hear from him again in a manner less acceptable. A general commotion then ensued among Caesar's friends, and they included many of the most respectable citizens in thenced to be overheard by some ladies, who speeded the intelligence to Caesar's friends. Their course then became clear. Mr. Wait instantly obtained from the Governor of the State the requisite authority and officers, proceeded to the vessel, and bro
Moses Pierce (search for this): chapter 13
es, $75; fruit, $25105 Nathaniel Tracy — Fence10 John W. Hastings — House and fence25 Rev. John Pierpont--Buildings, $500; fruit-trees, $100600 Heirs of Jonathan Brooks — Buildings and fences, $677; fruit-trees, $500; ornamental trees, $200; fruit, vegetables, and hay, $80; carriages and hay-rack, $1751,632 Alfred Brooks — Buildings, $350; fruit-trees, $100450 Noah Johnson — Buildings, $445; hay and grain in barn, $40; ox-wagon and farming-tools, $42527 James Wyman — Fruit-trees30 Moses Pierce — House25 John V. Fletcher — House, $25; fruit-trees, $2045 Joseph Swan — Fruit-trees20 P. C. Hall-Fruit-trees, $920; ornamental trees, $50; fruit, $801,050 Jonathan Porter — Fruit-trees, $75; fruit, $35110 William Roach — Fruit-trees25 Dudley Hall — Fruit-trees25 Samuel Kidder — Buildings, $50 ; fruit-trees, $400; ornamental trees, $50500 Thatcher R. Raymond — Fruit-trees, $100; ornamental trees, $100; fences, $10210 John A. Page — Fruit-trees, $150; ornam
L. B. Usher (search for this): chapter 13
y contract, both entirely demolished, including, in one case, the cellar wall. One of these buildings was on the property belonging to T. P. Smith and others, $4,320; the other was for the Rev. Mr. Haskins, $1,4505,770 House building by J. F. Edward, on property belonging to T. P. Smith and others12 Boston and Lowell Railroad Company — Freight car blown from track, and buildings injured40 J. M. Usher — Buildings, $442; fruit-trees, $30; fruit; ornamental tree (horse-chestnut), $50522 L. B. Usher — Buildings, $50; fruit-trees and fruit, $58; ornamental trees (elm in road, and horse-chestnut), $100208 Heirs of Leonard Bucknam — Buildings and fences, $450; fruit-trees, $25475 J. M. Sanford — Fence, $10; vegetables, $5; furniture and clothing, $150 ;. carriages, $75$240 H. T. Nutter — Vegetables, $5; furniture and clothing, $400405 Joseph Wyatt — Buildings, $250; fruit-trees, $150; fruit, $10410 Town of Medford — Buildings (school and poorhouse fences, &c.), $410; ornam
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