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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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John Pierpont (search for this): chapter 13
witnessed. It has waked up the nation to the injustice and moral evil of involuntary bondage; and Medford has its full share of intelligent, persevering, and Christian opposers of the slave-system. Advocates of the system we have none. The Rev. John Pierpont and the Rev. Caleb Stetson early became devoted and able lecturers in the field; and, if a fugitive slave should now reach Medford, there would be fifty Nathan Waits to shelter and comfort him. Pauperism. To this class of unfortun820 Wellington Russell — Clothing and furniture25 E. T. Hastings — Fences, $30 ; fruit-trees, $100; fruit, $20150 J. B. Hatch — Fences, $5; fruit-trees, $75; fruit, $25105 Nathaniel Tracy — Fence10 John W. Hastings — House and fence25 Rev. John Pierpont--Buildings, $500; fruit-trees, $100600 Heirs of Jonathan Brooks — Buildings and fences, $677; fruit-trees, $500; ornamental trees, $200; fruit, vegetables, and hay, $80; carriages and hay-rack, $1751,632 Alfred Brooks — Buildings,
Stephen Greenleaf (search for this): chapter 13
to remain with their masters; and they were faithful unto death. List of slaves, and their owners' names. Worcester,owned byRev. E. Turell. PompeyDr. Simon Tufts. RoseCaptain Thomas Brooks. PompCaptain Thomas Brooks. PeterCaptain Francis Whitmore. LondonSimon Bradshaw. SelbyDeacon Benjamin Willis. PrinceBenjamin Hall. PunchWidow Brooks. FloraStephen Hall. RichardHugh Floyd. DinahCaptain Kent. CaesarMr. Brown. ScipioMr. Pool. PeterSquire Hall. NiceSquire Hall. CuffeeStephen Greenleaf. IsaacJoseph Tufts. AaronHenry Gardner. Chloe-------- Negro girlMr. Boylston. Negro womanDr. Brooks. Joseph, Plato, PhebeIsaac Royal. Peter, Abraham, CooperIsaac Royal. Stephy, George, HagarIsaac Royal. Mira, Nancy, BetseyIsaac Royal. We are indebted to a friend for the following: It may be interesting here to mention a circumstance illustrative of the general feeling of the town in those days with regard to slavery. In the spring of 1798 or ‘99, a foreigner named Andrie
Nicholas Davison (search for this): chapter 13
presently executed. This sentence, so worthy of Draco, convinces us that some of the early judges in the colony were men who had baptized their passions with the name of holiness, and then felt that they had a right to murder humanity in the name of God. June 5, 1638: John Smyth, of Meadford, for swearing, being penitent, was set in the bilboes. Oct. 4, 1638: Henry Collins is fined five shillings for not appearing when he was called to serve upon the grand jury. Sept. 3, 1639: Nicholas Davison (Mr. Cradock's agent), for swearing an oath, was ordered to pay one pound; which he consented unto. Nov. 14, 1644: The General Court order that all Baptists shall be banished, if they defend their doctrine. Nov. 4, 1646: The General Court decree that the blasphemer shall be put to death. May 26, 1647: Roman Catholic priests and Jesuits are forbidden to enter this jurisdiction. They shall be banished on their first visit; and, on their second, they shall be put to death. Edw
754, there were in Medford twenty-seven male and seven female slaves, and fifteen free blacks; total, forty-nine. In 1764, there were forty-nine free blacks. When the law freed all the slaves, many in Medford chose to remain with their masters; and they were faithful unto death. List of slaves, and their owners' names. Worcester,owned byRev. E. Turell. PompeyDr. Simon Tufts. RoseCaptain Thomas Brooks. PompCaptain Thomas Brooks. PeterCaptain Francis Whitmore. LondonSimon Bradshaw. SelbyDeacon Benjamin Willis. PrinceBenjamin Hall. PunchWidow Brooks. FloraStephen Hall. RichardHugh Floyd. DinahCaptain Kent. CaesarMr. Brown. ScipioMr. Pool. PeterSquire Hall. NiceSquire Hall. CuffeeStephen Greenleaf. IsaacJoseph Tufts. AaronHenry Gardner. Chloe-------- Negro girlMr. Boylston. Negro womanDr. Brooks. Joseph, Plato, PhebeIsaac Royal. Peter, Abraham, CooperIsaac Royal. Stephy, George, HagarIsaac Royal. Mira, Nancy, BetseyIsaac Royal. We are indebted to a frie
William Roach (search for this): chapter 13
mental trees, $200; fruit, vegetables, and hay, $80; carriages and hay-rack, $1751,632 Alfred Brooks — Buildings, $350; fruit-trees, $100450 Noah Johnson — Buildings, $445; hay and grain in barn, $40; ox-wagon and farming-tools, $42527 James Wyman — Fruit-trees30 Moses Pierce — House25 John V. Fletcher — House, $25; fruit-trees, $2045 Joseph Swan — Fruit-trees20 P. C. Hall-Fruit-trees, $920; ornamental trees, $50; fruit, $801,050 Jonathan Porter — Fruit-trees, $75; fruit, $35110 William Roach — Fruit-trees25 Dudley Hall — Fruit-trees25 Samuel Kidder — Buildings, $50 ; fruit-trees, $400; ornamental trees, $50500 Thatcher R. Raymond — Fruit-trees, $100; ornamental trees, $100; fences, $10210 John A. Page — Fruit-trees, $150; ornamental trees, $50; fences, $50250 ----Russell — Ornamental trees150 Orchard (East of Andover Turnpike)40    $18,768 Loss of property in West Cambridge, $23,606. In Waltham, $4,000. The other report of facts, in the
James M. Usher (search for this): chapter 13
tables, $10985 Charles Rollins--Two dwelling-houses, unfinished, which Mr. Rollins was building by contract, both entirely demolished, including, in one case, the cellar wall. One of these buildings was on the property belonging to T. P. Smith and others, $4,320; the other was for the Rev. Mr. Haskins, $1,4505,770 House building by J. F. Edward, on property belonging to T. P. Smith and others12 Boston and Lowell Railroad Company — Freight car blown from track, and buildings injured40 J. M. Usher — Buildings, $442; fruit-trees, $30; fruit; ornamental tree (horse-chestnut), $50522 L. B. Usher — Buildings, $50; fruit-trees and fruit, $58; ornamental trees (elm in road, and horse-chestnut), $100208 Heirs of Leonard Bucknam — Buildings and fences, $450; fruit-trees, $25475 J. M. Sanford — Fence, $10; vegetables, $5; furniture and clothing, $150 ;. carriages, $75$240 H. T. Nutter — Vegetables, $5; furniture and clothing, $400405 Joseph Wyatt — Buildings, $250; fruit-trees,
Joseph Tufts (search for this): chapter 13
masters; and they were faithful unto death. List of slaves, and their owners' names. Worcester,owned byRev. E. Turell. PompeyDr. Simon Tufts. RoseCaptain Thomas Brooks. PompCaptain Thomas Brooks. PeterCaptain Francis Whitmore. LondonSimon Bradshaw. SelbyDeacon Benjamin Willis. PrinceBenjamin Hall. PunchWidow Brooks. FloraStephen Hall. RichardHugh Floyd. DinahCaptain Kent. CaesarMr. Brown. ScipioMr. Pool. PeterSquire Hall. NiceSquire Hall. CuffeeStephen Greenleaf. IsaacJoseph Tufts. AaronHenry Gardner. Chloe-------- Negro girlMr. Boylston. Negro womanDr. Brooks. Joseph, Plato, PhebeIsaac Royal. Peter, Abraham, CooperIsaac Royal. Stephy, George, HagarIsaac Royal. Mira, Nancy, BetseyIsaac Royal. We are indebted to a friend for the following: It may be interesting here to mention a circumstance illustrative of the general feeling of the town in those days with regard to slavery. In the spring of 1798 or ‘99, a foreigner named Andriesse, originally from Ho
John Brown (search for this): chapter 13
-nine free blacks. When the law freed all the slaves, many in Medford chose to remain with their masters; and they were faithful unto death. List of slaves, and their owners' names. Worcester,owned byRev. E. Turell. PompeyDr. Simon Tufts. RoseCaptain Thomas Brooks. PompCaptain Thomas Brooks. PeterCaptain Francis Whitmore. LondonSimon Bradshaw. SelbyDeacon Benjamin Willis. PrinceBenjamin Hall. PunchWidow Brooks. FloraStephen Hall. RichardHugh Floyd. DinahCaptain Kent. CaesarMr. Brown. ScipioMr. Pool. PeterSquire Hall. NiceSquire Hall. CuffeeStephen Greenleaf. IsaacJoseph Tufts. AaronHenry Gardner. Chloe-------- Negro girlMr. Boylston. Negro womanDr. Brooks. Joseph, Plato, PhebeIsaac Royal. Peter, Abraham, CooperIsaac Royal. Stephy, George, HagarIsaac Royal. Mira, Nancy, BetseyIsaac Royal. We are indebted to a friend for the following: It may be interesting here to mention a circumstance illustrative of the general feeling of the town in those days wit
John Whitmore (search for this): chapter 13
rly into use. It was placed so near a stream of water as to allow the cattle in it to drink. Where the first one in Medford was placed, we know not. The first record is as follows:-- Feb. 25, 1684: At a general meeting of the inhabitants, John Whitmore granted a piece of land for the use of the town, for the setting up of a pound; which land lies on the south-east of John Whitmore's land, lying near John Bradshaw's house, and is bounded south on John Bradshaw, and east upon the country roadJohn Whitmore's land, lying near John Bradshaw's house, and is bounded south on John Bradshaw, and east upon the country road. At the same meeting, the inhabitants agreed to set up a pound on the land aforesaid. April 28, 1684: Thomas Willis was chosen to keep the town's pound; and said pound-keeper shall have, for pounding, twopence per head for horses and also neat cattle; one penny for each hog; and, for sheep, after the rate of sixpence per score. This answered all purposes until May 15, 1758, when the town voted to build a new pound with stone. This was built accordingly, and placed on the west side of
Mathew Cradock (search for this): chapter 13
anelled, concerning the death of Austen Bratcher (Bradshaw). Austen Bratcher, dying lately at Mr. Cradock's plantation, was viewed before his burial by divers persons. The jury's verdict: We find tht guilty. At a court held at Watertown, March 8, 1631, Ordered that Thomas Fox, servant of Mr. Cradock, shall be whipped for uttering malicious and scandalous speeches, whereby he sought to traducn without his benediction. June 14, 1631: At this court, one Philip Radcliff, a servant of Mr. Cradock, being convict, ore tenus, of most foul, scandalous invectives against our churches and goverppearing when he was called to serve upon the grand jury. Sept. 3, 1639: Nicholas Davison (Mr. Cradock's agent), for swearing an oath, was ordered to pay one pound; which he consented unto. Nov died, leaving two children undisposed of, the charge of the one is ordered to be defrayed by Mr. Cradock, he having the goods of the deceased, the other child being disposed of by the country. We s
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