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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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s. The Rev. Aaron Porter's signature may be seen in the townrecords, under date of May 15 and Aug. 20, 1717. June 12, 1717.--There was a hearing before the council concerning the question, whether Cambridge or Charlestown should be the shire-town of Middlesex County. Judge Sewall says, Mr. Auchmuty pleaded very well for Charlestown. His discourse was very well worth hearing. Mr. Remington alleged and proved for Cambridge very pertinately and fully. It was decided for Cambridge on the 13th. Then came the question of concurrence before the House of Deputies. It was a close vote. The judge says, Could not tell by lifting up the hands: were fain to divide the house. They for Cambridge went to the north side; they for Charlestown, to the south. Cambridge had forty-six; Charlestown, forty-one. 1718.--Ruth Albree, daughter of John Albree, afterwards the mother of John Brooks, was baptized May 4, 1718, and was taken into church Jan. 24, 1743. May 12, 1718.--Put to vote, whe
January 1st (search for this): chapter 16
teenth century. 1750.--The various spelling of proper names by the different town-clerks of Medford sometimes makes it difficult to determine how families spelled their own names. 1750.--A gallows and a whipping-post stood near Porter's tavern, in Cambridge; and this gave rise to the schoolboy strophe:--Cambridge is a famous town, Both for wit and knowledge: Some they whip, and some they hang, And some they send to college. Sept. 3, 1752.--The Protestants in England adopted the 1st of January as the beginning of the year, instead of the 25th of March; and Sept. 3 was changed to Sept. 14. Jan. 29, 1753.--Dr. Simon Tufts, and Lucy Tufts, his wife, of Medford, gave a quitclaim deed to Thomas Dudley of all their right to the property of their honored father, William Dudley, Esq., of Roxbury. In 1755, Massachusetts raised a large part of the two thousand troops who were to dislodge the French Neutrals in Nova Scotia. Medford furnished its share. These Acadians were conquer
ord. Her grandfather was Rev. John Cotton, of England, a very distinguished divine. Dr. Simon Tufts, of Medford, was the youngest son of Peter and. Mercy Tufts. 1727.--Mr. Thomas Seccomb left valuable records, in manuscript, containing a notice of every clergyman who preached in Medford, and all the texts preached from, between 1727 and 1774; also a record of all baptisms and all contributions. Book No 1 begins Sept.3, 1727;and ends June1, 1736. Book No 2 begins June20, 1736;and ends Feb.28, 1745. Book No 3 begins March3, 1745;and ends Dec.3, 1767. Book No 4 begins Dec.20, 1767;and ends May1, 1774. In the second meeting-house, 5,134 sermons were preached, and 1,218 persons baptized. Oct. 29, 1727.--The great earthquake occurred on this day (Sunday); and. the selectmen of Medford appointed the next Wednesday, Nov. 2, to be observed as a day of fasting and humiliation on that account. September, 1729.--The Yankee habit of using a jack-knife on all occasions and in a
March 25th (search for this): chapter 16
es by the different town-clerks of Medford sometimes makes it difficult to determine how families spelled their own names. 1750.--A gallows and a whipping-post stood near Porter's tavern, in Cambridge; and this gave rise to the schoolboy strophe:--Cambridge is a famous town, Both for wit and knowledge: Some they whip, and some they hang, And some they send to college. Sept. 3, 1752.--The Protestants in England adopted the 1st of January as the beginning of the year, instead of the 25th of March; and Sept. 3 was changed to Sept. 14. Jan. 29, 1753.--Dr. Simon Tufts, and Lucy Tufts, his wife, of Medford, gave a quitclaim deed to Thomas Dudley of all their right to the property of their honored father, William Dudley, Esq., of Roxbury. In 1755, Massachusetts raised a large part of the two thousand troops who were to dislodge the French Neutrals in Nova Scotia. Medford furnished its share. These Acadians were conquered, and they and their effects scattered through the coloni
s in Medford, between 1774 and 1809, was 701. 1810.--Medford had a large choir of volunteer singers, under the faithful Ephraim Bailey. On Sunday, once, the pitch-pipe set the pitch so high that the whole choir broke down. Still, Bailey tried on the second verse, and again broke down. General Brooks could not endure it any longer; and he rose in his pew, beckoned to Bailey, and said, Hadn't you better take another pitch? Bailey replied, No, sir: I guess we can get through it. 1811, May 13.--Voted to instruct the representative of Medford in the General Court to oppose the petition of Peter Tufts, praying to be set off to Charlestown. The petition was granted. 1814.--The free seats near the pulpit in the meeting-house, which were formerly occupied by aged men and women, were sold, and two pews built in their place. 1815.--Nahant Parties. At this time, when only a few persons resided at Nahant, it was the custom for families in Medford to join in a party to that beautifu
ound per cord. 1794.--Joseph Kidder, son of Deacon Samuel Kidder, strayed from home into the woods back of Pasture till. He was three years old; and, being weary, he fell asleep under an apple-tree, and there slept till the next day. It was in July, and the weather very clear. The disappearance of the child created great alarm; and many inhabitants spent the night in traversing the woods, searching the clay-pits, and dredging the river. During the forenoon, he was found near where he sleptillars which sustained the gallery of the third meeting-house (1770) are now in use in West Medford, on the outside of the house of the late Jonathan Brooks. Mr. Turell's Portrait.--In Church Records, vol. III. p. 104, are the following: 1842, July.--The church received, from the hand of Dudley Hall, a bequest of the late Turell Tufts, Esq.,--two pieces of plate for the communion-table; and a portrait of the Rev. Mr. Turell, one of the former pastors of this church. Aug. 7.--At a meeting
as sorely frightened by a wild bear and cub, which he met in the woods, near Governor Cradock's house. In a rock on the north-east border of Medford, near the corner of Melrose, is a deep excavation, called Bear's Den. Oct. 8, 1738.--Governor Belcher attended meeting in Medford, Sunday. Rev. Mr. Turell preached. Rev. Joshua Tufts preached in Medford, Aug. 24, 1740. A species of very destructive worm appeared in July, 1743. They destroyed both grass and corn. Mr. Turell preached, July 3, on the event, from Lam. III. 39, and Ezek. XVIII. 25. 1744.--A long-tailed comet, of unusual brightness, frightened some of our people more than Mr. Whitefield had; but a wag here said, that he thought it the most profitable itinerant preacher and friendly new-light that had yet appeared. 1745.--Medford voted thus: Any person who allows his dog to go into the meeting-house on Sunday shall pay ten shillings (old tenor) for each offence. 1749.--Some idea of travelling expenses may
August 7th (search for this): chapter 16
ny. 1840.--The pillars which sustained the gallery of the third meeting-house (1770) are now in use in West Medford, on the outside of the house of the late Jonathan Brooks. Mr. Turell's Portrait.--In Church Records, vol. III. p. 104, are the following: 1842, July.--The church received, from the hand of Dudley Hall, a bequest of the late Turell Tufts, Esq.,--two pieces of plate for the communion-table; and a portrait of the Rev. Mr. Turell, one of the former pastors of this church. Aug. 7.--At a meeting of the church this day, a letter was read by Dudley Hall, from Samuel Turell Armstrong, requesting the church to transfer to him, during his lifetime, the above-mentioned portrait of Mr. Turell. The church voted unanimously that this request be complied with; and that Dudley Hall, the treasurer, be authorized to deliver the portrait to Mr. Armstrong. It is now in the possession of Mrs. S. T. Armstrong, widow, in Boston. 1854.--In the New England Historical and Genealogi
n Cotton, was born Nov. 3, 1666. She married Captain Peter Tufts, of Medford. Her grandfather was Rev. John Cotton, of England, a very distinguished divine. Dr. Simon Tufts, of Medford, was the youngest son of Peter and. Mercy Tufts. 1727.--Mr. Thomas Seccomb left valuable records, in manuscript, containing a notice of every clergyman who preached in Medford, and all the texts preached from, between 1727 and 1774; also a record of all baptisms and all contributions. Book No 1 begins Sept.3, 1727;and ends June1, 1736. Book No 2 begins June20, 1736;and ends Feb.28, 1745. Book No 3 begins March3, 1745;and ends Dec.3, 1767. Book No 4 begins Dec.20, 1767;and ends May1, 1774. In the second meeting-house, 5,134 sermons were preached, and 1,218 persons baptized. Oct. 29, 1727.--The great earthquake occurred on this day (Sunday); and. the selectmen of Medford appointed the next Wednesday, Nov. 2, to be observed as a day of fasting and humiliation on that account. Septemb
September 3rd (search for this): chapter 16
ent town-clerks of Medford sometimes makes it difficult to determine how families spelled their own names. 1750.--A gallows and a whipping-post stood near Porter's tavern, in Cambridge; and this gave rise to the schoolboy strophe:--Cambridge is a famous town, Both for wit and knowledge: Some they whip, and some they hang, And some they send to college. Sept. 3, 1752.--The Protestants in England adopted the 1st of January as the beginning of the year, instead of the 25th of March; and Sept. 3 was changed to Sept. 14. Jan. 29, 1753.--Dr. Simon Tufts, and Lucy Tufts, his wife, of Medford, gave a quitclaim deed to Thomas Dudley of all their right to the property of their honored father, William Dudley, Esq., of Roxbury. In 1755, Massachusetts raised a large part of the two thousand troops who were to dislodge the French Neutrals in Nova Scotia. Medford furnished its share. These Acadians were conquered, and they and their effects scattered through the colonies. One thousan
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