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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
, at Lynn1803 The Validity of Baptism by Sprinkling, and the Right of Infants to that Ordinance1804 On Family Religion1808 At the Annual Election1809 At the University in Cambridge1810 A Solemn Protest against the late Declaration of War1812 At the Ordination of the Rev. Convers Francis, in Watertown1819 Volume of Sermons, pp. 4691824 Samuel Hall. He was born in Medford, November, 1740, and served his apprenticeship, at the printing-business, with his uncle, Daniel Fowle, of Portsmouth. He began business in 1763, at Newport, R. I., in company with Anne Franklin. He left Newport in March, 1768, and opened a printing-office in Salem in April, and commenced the publication of the Essex Gazette, Aug. 2 of that year. In 1772, he admitted his brother Ebenezer as partner in trade; and the firm was Samuel and Ebenezer Hall. They remained in Salem until May, 1775, when they removed to Cambridge, and printed in Stoughton Hall. Their paper was then called New England chronicle
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
in United States1847-50 Plan of a Farm-school for City Boys1849 Sermon on the Cholera, Greenfield1849 Concluding Lecture,--American Institute of Instruction; On the Duties of Legislatures,--at Montpelier, Vt.1849 Address at Dedication of Brooks Schoolhouse1851 Sanatory Survey of the State, Christian Examiner 1851 On Marriage of First Cousins1852 History of Medford1855 Contributions to Silliman's Journal; Journals of Education in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, New York, and Ohio; North American Review; Knickerbocker; Graham's Magazine; Friend of Peace; Christian Citizen; Colonization Tracts; Christian Examiner; Unitarian Miscellany; Monthly Religious Magazine.  Rev. William H. Furness. Remarks on the Four Gospels1836 Jesus and his Biographers1838 The Spirit of the Pilgrims; an Oration delivered before the Society of the Sons of New England of Philadelphia, Dec. 221846 Derby Academy Lecture,--Doing before Believing1847 An Address delivered before the Art Union o
short, and to most persons must be very uninteresting. While in Europe, in 1833, I became interested in the Prussian system of education. at I originated these ideas. Oh, no! They were picked up by me in Europe. There had been an attempt at a teachers' seminary at Lancaster; aer; and the idea was not a new one. All I did was to bring it from Europe with me, and talk about it, and write about it, until the Old Colonfirst as an allopathic, and then (after a visit to Dr. Hahnemann in Europe) as a homoeopathic practitioner, has held a high rank. He is a mememan has published a large octavo volume, describing his travels in Europe, and several sermons, and very valuable reports respecting the mini838 Letters of a foreign Correspondent; being Communications from Europe, on Science, Natural History, Education, Pauperism, Fine Arts, and Committee of Boston1846 Remarks on Education, Peace, and Labor, in Europe, 2d ed.1846 Elementary Course of Natural History,--Ornithology1847
Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
llege-building; but the institution will not be regularly opened till about the 1st of September, 1855. Trustees. Oliver Dean, M. D., President; Rev. Thomas Whittemore, Vice-President; Rev. Otis A. Skinner, A. M., Secretary; Benjamin B. Mussey, Esq., Treasurer of the College; Hon. Israel Washburn, jun., Orono, Me.; Rev. Calvin Gardner, Waterville, Me.; Rev. Thomas J. Greenwood, Dover, N. H.; Rev. L. C. Browne, Hudson, N. Y.; Rev. Eli Ballou, Montpelier, Vt.; Silvanus Packard, Esq., Boston, Mass.; Rev. Hosea Ballou, 2d, D. D., Medford, Mass.; Timothy Cotting, Esq., Medford, Mass.; Hon. Richard Frothingham, jun., Charlestown, Mass.; Phineas T. Barnum, Esq., Bridgeport, Conn.; Thomas Crane, Esq., New York City; Charles Rogers, Esq., Philadelphia, Pa. Faculty. President, Hosea Ballou, 2d, D. D., Professor of History and of Intellectual Philosophy; John P. Marshall, A. M., Professor of Mathematics and of Physical Science; William P. Drew, A. B., Professor of Ancient Languages a
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e oak. It is important to state that free schools originated in Massachusetts. In 1671, Sir William Berkeley, first Governor of Virginia, s and all abominations. God save us from both! Now look at Massachusetts. The Rev. John Robinson, before the Pilgrims left Leyden, chargfficiently explain the facts. Materials for a history of Massachusetts schools. The communications in our former numbers, respectinBefore the Annual Convention of the Congregational Ministers of Massachusetts1798 At the Ordination of Rev. Leonard Woods, at Newbury1798 Tonday, Nov. 26, of that month, he issued the first sheet of the Massachusetts Gazette. He died Oct. 30, 1807, aged sixty-seven. He was an a Education, &c.,--Lectures delivered before the Legislatures of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Connecticut1836 History of Preach Contributions to Silliman's Journal; Journals of Education in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, New York, and Ohio; North American
Brighton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
been a hinderance. On the election of Dr. Brooks to the office of governor, he resigned his medical practice to his pupil and friend,-- Dr. Daniel Swan, of Medford,--who graduated at Harvard College in 1803. He first entered on practice at Brighton, in 1808, where for eight years he had all the success he anticipated. He was invited by the inhabitants of Medford, in 1816, to become their physician; and, having obeyed the call, he has practised nearly forty years as the established physici different times; several Illustrations of Scripture, at different times. Right Hand of Fellowship at the Ordination of Rev. Charles Brooks, in Hingham1821 The Address to the Phi Beta Kappa Society1829 Obituary Notice of Rev. Dr. Foster, of Brighton1829 Address to the Society at the Ordination of Rev. T. B. Fox, Newburyport1831 Charge at the Installation of Rev. Edward B. Hall, Providence, R. I.1832 Address to the Society at the Ordination of Rev. John Pierpont, jun., Lynn1843 Obituary
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
slate for the future. The establishment of schools, during the first years of their residence, was an impossibility; and, consequently, domestic instruction was the only alternative. The Bible and Primer were the reading-books. In those towns or plantations where a clergyman could be supported, he usually occupied much of his time in teaching the young; and it was common for boys to be received into the minister's family to be prepared for college. Those pastors who had been silenced in England, and who came here to minister to the scattered flocks in the wilderness, were men of strong thought and sound scholarship; and they kept up the standard of education. From the necessities of their condition, however, it is apparent that the children of our ancestors must have been scantily taught, and their grandchildren still greater sufferers; for learning follows wealth. The first movement for the establishment of schools took place under the administration of Governor Prence; and,
Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
a better system was a talented son of Medford, Mr. William Channing Woodbridge, who received from his father a knowledge and love of school-teaching, and who, as editor of the Annals of Education, labored successfully for the great cause. His Modern School Geography and Atlas are proofs of his ability and enthusiasm; and we deeply regret that all our efforts to learn more of his history and labors have been so unsuccessful. He is an honorary member of the Geographical Societies of Paris, Frankfort, and Berlin. If another son of Medford has labored long and spent much for common schools, is it necessary that it should be noticed in this history? The writer of this has maintained, that, under the circumstances, it is not necessary; but he has at last been syllogized into the belief, that what was publicly done by a son of Medford towards the education-revival of 1835-7 belongs to the history of the town, and cannot be omitted without violating the rule followed in all other cases
Lancaster, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
h knowledge, and Christianity shall fill it with love! My friend, do not misinterpret my letter by supposing that I originated these ideas. Oh, no! They were picked up by me in Europe. There had been an attempt at a teachers' seminary at Lancaster; and the American Institute, unknown to me, had discussed the subject before I was a member; and the idea was not a new one. All I did was to bring it from Europe with me, and talk about it, and write about it, until the Old Colony adopted it.good. Sermons. On the Annual and National Thanksgiving1783 At the Installation of Rev. Peter Thatcher, in Brattle-street Church, Boston1785 Before the Ancient and Honorable Artillery, in Boston1788 At Ordination of Rev. N. Thayer, in Lancaster1793 On the Annual Thanksgiving1794 On the Day of the National Thanksgiving1795 On the Death of a Child, killed by a Gun1797 Before the Annual Convention of the Congregational Ministers of Massachusetts1798 At the Ordination of Rev. Leonard
Hudson, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ration. A few students are accommodated, for the present year, in the college-building; but the institution will not be regularly opened till about the 1st of September, 1855. Trustees. Oliver Dean, M. D., President; Rev. Thomas Whittemore, Vice-President; Rev. Otis A. Skinner, A. M., Secretary; Benjamin B. Mussey, Esq., Treasurer of the College; Hon. Israel Washburn, jun., Orono, Me.; Rev. Calvin Gardner, Waterville, Me.; Rev. Thomas J. Greenwood, Dover, N. H.; Rev. L. C. Browne, Hudson, N. Y.; Rev. Eli Ballou, Montpelier, Vt.; Silvanus Packard, Esq., Boston, Mass.; Rev. Hosea Ballou, 2d, D. D., Medford, Mass.; Timothy Cotting, Esq., Medford, Mass.; Hon. Richard Frothingham, jun., Charlestown, Mass.; Phineas T. Barnum, Esq., Bridgeport, Conn.; Thomas Crane, Esq., New York City; Charles Rogers, Esq., Philadelphia, Pa. Faculty. President, Hosea Ballou, 2d, D. D., Professor of History and of Intellectual Philosophy; John P. Marshall, A. M., Professor of Mathematics and of P
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