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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
o the aid of Pope. On the 28th of August, Heintzelman had pushed forward to Centreville, entering it soon after Stonewall Jackson's rear-guard had retired. Insteadull Run and by noon on the 28th the whole corps was once more united between Centreville and Sudley Spring. Late in the day he encountered King's division of McDoweConfederate advance upon Washington. Lee, on discovering Pope's position at Centreville on the next day, sent Stonewall Jackson to turn the Federal right. Crossinge remnant of his army and by morning was ensconced behind the field-works at Centreville. There was no mistaking the fact that General Pope had lost the battle anentrenchments of Washington. After spending a day behind the embankments at Centreville, the retreat was begun. Lee's troops with Jackson in the advance pursued aned than Stuart was following them. Ascertaining that their main body was at Centreville and Fairfax Court House, he planned to make an attack on the pike between th
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
valry to fall upon Catlett's Station and Manassas Junction for nothing. At Manassas the Confederat however, until after Jackson had seized Manassas Junction. At Manassas Junction, as it appeared iManassas Junction, as it appeared in the upper picture on August 26, 1862, is one of the great neglected strategic points in the theatunheeded warning Catlett's station Manassas Junction, while his vast store of army supplies wgust 26th on the Federal supply depot at Manassas Junction is here graphically preserved. When Jacertions. Trimble volunteered to move on Manassas Junction; and, under command of Stuart, a small fern. With baskets and armfuls of Manassas Junction. Where the troops of General McClellan,y forwarded, Stonewall Jackson's blow at Manassas Junction could not have been struck. At the newswith all speed to lead his forces toward Manassas Junction, where he had stored vast quantities of t to be caught in a trap. He moved from Manassas Junction by three roads toward the old battle-fie[2 more...]
Waterloo bridge (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
ll that was needed to make them an effective force. Jackson was now in position to control the movements of the Federal army under Pope. Lee was completely thwarted in his purpose of attacking Pope before his reenforcements arrived. But he was not idle. He sent the dauntless cavalry leader, J. E. B. Stuart, to make a raid around the Union army. Stuart did this effectively, and this was the first of the two notable events of these weeks of sparring. Crossing the Rappahannock at Waterloo Bridge with fifteen hundred mounted men as bold and dauntless as himself, Stuart dashed up the country, riding all day and all night. After the coming of night on the evening of the 22d, in the midst of a torrential rainstorm, while the darkness was so intense that every man was guided by the tread of his brother horsemen, Stuart pounced upon the Federals near Catlett's Station, overpowered the astonished guard, captured nearly two hundred prisoners, scattering the remainder of the troops sta
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
and lead him to believe that he was to be attacked in front. The trick was eminently successful. Stonewall Jackson suddenly, on August 26th, emerged from the Bull Run Mountains by way of the Thoroughfare Gap and marshaled his clans on the plains of Manassas, but a few miles from the site of the famous battle of the year before. Pope had taken alarm. He was astonished to find Jackson in his rear, and he had to decide instantly between two courses — to abandon his communications with Fredericksburg on the one hand, or with Alexandria and Washington on the other. He decided to keep in touch with Washington at all hazards. Breaking his Camp on the Rappahannock, he hastened with all speed to lead his forces toward Manassas Junction, where he had stored vast quantities of provisions and munitions of war. But he was too late to save them. Jackson had been joined by Stuart and his cavalry. On the evening of the 26th they were still some miles from Manassas and Trimble was sent ahead
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
t 27th. Later in the day General Taylor's brigade arrived by the Fairfax road and, crossing the railroad bridge, met the Confederates drawn up and waiting near Manassas Station. A severe artillery fire greeted the Federals as they emerged from the woods. As General Taylor had no artillery, he was obliged either to retire or charge. He chose the latter. When the Confederate cavalry threatened to surround his small force, however, Taylor fell back in good order across the bridge, where two Ohio regiments assisted in holding the Confederates in check. At this point, General Taylor, who had been wounded in the retreat, was borne past in a litter. Though suffering much, he appealed to the officers to prevent another Bull Run. The brigade retired in good order to Fairfax Court House, where General Taylor died of his wounds a short time afterward. A start too long delayed: Union troops held back at Alexandria before Jackson's blow at Manassas Junction. Brigadier-General George
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
rce encounter followed in a drenching rainstorm. The brilliant bayonet charge by Birney, in command of the division of General Philip Kearney, who had just fallen, drove back the Confederates, and Birney held the field that night. The next morning orders came from General Halleck for the broken and demoralized army of Pope to fall back within the defenses of Washington. Large quantities of Federal stores were left to fall into the hands of Lee, which were of great use in his advance into Maryland. the Union army made a desperate onslaught on the Confederate left under Jackson. Here for some time the slaughter of men was fearful. It was nearing sunset. Jackson saw that his lines were wavering. He called for reenforcements which did not come and it seemed as if the Federals were about to win a signal victory. But this was not to be. Far away on a little hill at the Confederate right Longstreet placed four batteries in such a position that he could enfilade the Federal columns.
Chantilly (Virginia, United States) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
Jackson advanced along a country road till he reached the Little River Turnpike, on which the troops bivouacked for the night. On September 1st he was met near Chantilly by Reno and Kearney, who had been sent by Pope to intercept him. A fierce encounter followed in a drenching rainstorm. The brilliant bayonet charge by Birney, iay behind the embankments at Centreville, the retreat was begun. Lee's troops with Jackson in the advance pursued and struck a portion of the retreating army at Chantilly. It was late in the afternoon of September 1st. The rain, accompanied by vivid lightning and terrific crashes of thunder, was falling in torrents as Stuart'sfederate guns threw everything into confusion, and such commotion, upsetting, collisions, and smash-ups were rarely ever seen. Stuart bivouacked that night near Chantilly, and after Jackson came up on September 1st, tried to force his way down the pike toward Fairfax Court House. But the Federals were too strong in number at that
Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
cDowell had failed to intercept the Confederate reinforcements coming through Thoroughfare Gap, and the situation had become critical. General Taylor, with his brigade of New Jersey troops, was the first of McClellan's forces to be moved forward to the aid of Pope. At Union Mills, Colonel Scammon, commanding the First Brigade, driven back from Manassas Junction, was further pressed by the Confederates on the morning of August 27th. Later in the day General Taylor's brigade arrived by the Fairfax road and, crossing the railroad bridge, met the Confederates drawn up and waiting near Manassas Station. A severe artillery fire greeted the Federals as they emerged from the woods. As General Taylor had no artillery, he was obliged either to retire or charge. He chose the latter. When the Confederate cavalry threatened to surround his small force, however, Taylor fell back in good order across the bridge, where two Ohio regiments assisted in holding the Confederates in check. At this
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
troops were held overlong at Alexandria. Had they been promptly forwarded, Stonewall Jackson's blow at Manassas Junction could not have been struck. At the news of that disaster the troops were hurriedly despatched down the railroad toward Manassas. But Pope was already in retreat in three columns toward that point, McDowell had failed to intercept the Confederate reinforcements coming through Thoroughfare Gap, and the situation had become critical. General Taylor, with his brigade of New Jersey troops, was the first of McClellan's forces to be moved forward to the aid of Pope. At Union Mills, Colonel Scammon, commanding the First Brigade, driven back from Manassas Junction, was further pressed by the Confederates on the morning of August 27th. Later in the day General Taylor's brigade arrived by the Fairfax road and, crossing the railroad bridge, met the Confederates drawn up and waiting near Manassas Station. A severe artillery fire greeted the Federals as they emerged from t
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): part 1.2, chapter 1.4
extending his lines so as to protect it from Jackson's incursion through Thoroughfare Gap; instead Had they been promptly forwarded, Stonewall Jackson's blow at Manassas Junction could not have be: Union troops held back at Alexandria before Jackson's blow at Manassas Junction. Brigadier-Genints and thus to divert Pope's attention from Jackson's movements and lead him to believe that he wmorning the weary and hungry foot soldiers of Jackson's army came upon the scene and whatever else Centreville, entering it soon after Stonewall Jackson's rear-guard had retired. Instead of pursuinast of Cub Run, which we see in the picture. Jackson's forces, now in a precarious position, fell te during the night of the 27th and move upon Jackson. McDowell sent Ricketts with a small force — hour approached a wild shout that arose from Jackson's men told too well of the arrival of Longstrthe Federal lines that were hammering away at Jackson, and opened fire. Ghastly gaps were soon cut
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