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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 20 total hits in 13 results.

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Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Preface A vision of the by-gone the sloop-of-war Portsmouth of the old navy Here is a sight the like of which never will be seen again — the U. S. sloop-of-war Portsmouth at anchor and drying out her sails. An honorable record did this old corvette leave behind her. Of the type of vessel that had fought in the War of 1812, she had gone through the Mexican War, and had chased and captured many a slaver. But a year or so ago, she was still afloat as the training-ship of the New JersePortsmouth at anchor and drying out her sails. An honorable record did this old corvette leave behind her. Of the type of vessel that had fought in the War of 1812, she had gone through the Mexican War, and had chased and captured many a slaver. But a year or so ago, she was still afloat as the training-ship of the New Jersey state militia. She has every sail up except her head-sails and studding sails. As can be seen at a glance, she was a very lofty craft, and though clewed up, she has her sky-sails, her royals, her topgallant-sails, her topsails, set on every mast. Excellent, whether sailing, steering, working, scudding, lying to, or riding at anchor in a seaway, she sometimes got her sternboard in stays. With this single exception, reported Commander Armstrong, she possesses the finest qualities of any ship
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
, steering, working, scudding, lying to, or riding at anchor in a seaway, she sometimes got her sternboard in stays. With this single exception, reported Commander Armstrong, she possesses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a confl
F. E. Chadwick (search for this): chapter 1
in heroic struggle, should form a story second to none in its fascination and interest. The Civil War ships and the men who fought them are distinctive in naval history, not for immensity of single battles or extent of total destruction, but for diversity of action, the complete realization of the ironclad as a fighting vessel, and the development of the torpedo as a weapon of destruction. Readers are fortunate in finding, at the outset of this volume, the scholarly appreciation by Admiral Chadwick of the essential part played by the navies in the war, while the battles at sea and on inland waters are described by Mr. Barnes with a vividness possible only to a naval historian to whom the sea and its sailors long have been objects of sympathetic study. The photographic record of the great American conflict is particularly striking in this volume. Never before has there been assembled such a pictorial and actual record of fleets and sailors, Union and Confederate. The stately f
Frobisher (search for this): chapter 1
, reported Commander Armstrong, she possesses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a conflict in which officers and seamen of the same race and speech, graduates of the same historic Naval Academy and sailing the same seas and along t
John Paul Jones (search for this): chapter 1
Armstrong, she possesses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a conflict in which officers and seamen of the same race and speech, graduates of the same historic Naval Academy and sailing the same seas and along the same shores, met i
he possesses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a conflict in which officers and seamen of the same race and speech, graduates of the same historic Naval Academy and sailing the same seas and along the same shores, met in heroic str
Bainbridge (search for this): chapter 1
ses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a conflict in which officers and seamen of the same race and speech, graduates of the same historic Naval Academy and sailing the same seas and along the same shores, met in heroic struggle, sho
le exception, reported Commander Armstrong, she possesses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a conflict in which officers and seamen of the same race and speech, graduates of the same historic Naval Academy and sailing the same seas
David Dixon Porter (search for this): chapter 1
nest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a conflict in which officers and seamen of the same race and speech, graduates of the same historic Naval Academy and sailing the same seas and along the same shores, met in heroic struggle, should form a
Richard F. Armstrong (search for this): chapter 1
he was still afloat as the training-ship of the New Jersey state militia. She has every sail up except her head-sails and studding sails. As can be seen at a glance, she was a very lofty craft, and though clewed up, she has her sky-sails, her royals, her topgallant-sails, her topsails, set on every mast. Excellent, whether sailing, steering, working, scudding, lying to, or riding at anchor in a seaway, she sometimes got her sternboard in stays. With this single exception, reported Commander Armstrong, she possesses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Pa
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