hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Merrimac 182 0 Browse Search
David Glasgow Farragut 138 2 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 92 0 Browse Search
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) 89 1 Browse Search
David D. Porter 80 0 Browse Search
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) 77 1 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 76 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 72 0 Browse Search
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) 62 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 1,210 total hits in 500 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
and Porter. July 4, 1862. Confed. gunboat Teaser captured on James River by U. S. steamer Maratanza. On the deck of the Agawam The easy attitudes of the acting ensign, to the left of the gun, and the volunteer acting-master with him, do not suggest the storm through which the ship on which they stand, the Federal gunboat Agawam, passed in the spring of 1864. Their vessel was called upon to cooperate in Grant's great military movement that was to bring the war to a close. In February, Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, commanding the North Atlantic squadron, was ready to assist General Butler with gunboats in the James and York Rivers. The admiral himself remained with his main squadron at Fortress Monroe to convey Butler's expedition to Bermuda Hundred. After that general got himself bottled up and, despite the protests of Admiral Lee, had sunk obstructions in the James to prevent the Confederate gunboats from coming down, the Virginia and her consorts came down to recon
April 16th (search for this): chapter 15
avy was sorely in need of ships, and she was christened after the donor. In Hampton Roads she led one of the two columns of fighting-vessels of all sorts that had been assembled to meet the Merrimac, in case she made another attack upon the fleet after her encounter with the Monitor. The Vanderbilt mounted fifteen guns and showed great speed. She was employed largely as a cruiser. Her first prize was the British blockade-runner Peterhoff, captured off St. Thomas, February 25, 1863. On April 16th she caught the Gertrude in the Bahamas, and on October 30th the Saxon, off the coast of Africa. Under command of Captain C. W. Pickering, she participated in both of the joint-expeditions against Fort Fisher. July 28, 1861. Confederate privateer Petrel, formerly U. S. revenue cutter Aiken, sunk by U. S. frigate St. Lawrence near Charleston. August, 1861. August 22, 1861. The steamer Samuel Orr was seized at Paducah, Ky., by Confederates, and taken up the Tennessee Rive
y escaping uninjured. The Confed. works were captured by the land forces under Col. Fitch, who took 30 prisoners. June 26, 1862. Three Confed. gunboats burned on the Yazoo River by their officers, to prevent their capture by the Union ramflotilla, Lieut.-Col. A. W. Ellet, then in pursuit of them. June 28, 1862. Flag-Officer Farragut with nine vessels of his fleet ran by the Confed. batteries at Vicksburg, through a severe fire, forming a junction with Western Flotilla on July 1st. June 29, 1862. Steamship Ann, of London, with a valuable cargo, captured by the U. S. steamer Kanawha, in Mobile Bay, under the guns of Fort Morgan. July, 1862. July 1, 1862. Porter's mortar flotilla engaged the Confed. batteries at Vicksburg, Miss. July 2, 1862. Commencement of bombardment of Vicksburg, Miss., by the combined mortar fleets of Davis and Porter. July 4, 1862. Confed. gunboat Teaser captured on James River by U. S. steamer Maratanza. On
October 30th (search for this): chapter 15
er the donor. In Hampton Roads she led one of the two columns of fighting-vessels of all sorts that had been assembled to meet the Merrimac, in case she made another attack upon the fleet after her encounter with the Monitor. The Vanderbilt mounted fifteen guns and showed great speed. She was employed largely as a cruiser. Her first prize was the British blockade-runner Peterhoff, captured off St. Thomas, February 25, 1863. On April 16th she caught the Gertrude in the Bahamas, and on October 30th the Saxon, off the coast of Africa. Under command of Captain C. W. Pickering, she participated in both of the joint-expeditions against Fort Fisher. July 28, 1861. Confederate privateer Petrel, formerly U. S. revenue cutter Aiken, sunk by U. S. frigate St. Lawrence near Charleston. August, 1861. August 22, 1861. The steamer Samuel Orr was seized at Paducah, Ky., by Confederates, and taken up the Tennessee River. August 26, 1861. Naval and military expedition t
November 10th (search for this): chapter 15
8-9, 1863. An assault made on Fort Sumter by 400 men in 20 boats from the Federal fleet, under Commander T. H. Stevens. The sailors were defeated with the loss of 124. September 8, 1863. U. S. gunboats Clifton and Sachem, attached to an expedition under Gen. Franklin, grounded on the bar at Sabine Pass, Texas, and were captured by the Confederates. October, 1863. October 5, 1863. Confederates attempt to destroy the New Ironsides with the torpedo-boat David. 26 to Nov. 10.--Bombardment of Fort Sumter. October 30, 1863. Heavy bombardment of Charleston, S. C. November, 1863. November 2, 1863. Unsuccessful attempt upon Sumter by a boat expedition. December, 1863. December 6, 1863. Monitor Weehawken founders in Charleston Harbor. Over 30 lives lost. December 5, 1863. Fight between the U. S. gunboat Marblehead and Confed. batteries on Stono River, S. C. Confederates defeated. February, 1864. February 2, 1864. Cap
sunk by U. S. frigate St. Lawrence near Charleston. August, 1861. August 22, 1861. The steamer Samuel Orr was seized at Paducah, Ky., by Confederates, and taken up the Tennessee River. August 26, 1861. Naval and military expedition to North Carolina coast sailed from Hampton Roads, Va., under command of Flag-Officer Stringham and Maj.-Gen. Butler. August 28-29, 1861. Bombardment and capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark, at Hatteras Inlet, N. C., 30 pieces of cannon, 1000 stand of arms, 3 vessels with valuable cargoes, and 750 prisoners were taken. August 30, 1861. Capt. Foote ordered to the command of U. S. naval forces on the Western waters. September, 1861. September 4, 1861. Engagement on the Mississippi River near Hickman, Ky., between U. S. gunboats Tyler and Lexington and the Confed. gunboat Yankee and shore batteries. September 14, 1861. An expedition from the U. S. frigate Colorado, under Lieut. J. H. Russell, destroyed the
destroyed. September, 1862. September 5, 1862. Ship Ocmulgee burned at sea by Confed. cruiser Alabama. September 17, 1862. U. S. gunboats Paul Jones, Cimarron, and 3 other vessels attacked Confed. batteries on St. John's River, Florida. September 25, 1862. Sabine Pass, Texas, captured by U. S. steamer Kensington and schooner Rachel Seaman. October, 1862. October 3, 1862. Confed. fortifications at St. John's Bluff, on St. John's River, Fla., captured by 1500 Federals under Gen. Brannan, assisted by 7 gunboats from Hilton Head, S. C. Fight on the Blackwater River, near Franklin, Va., 3 Federal gunboats, Commodore Perry, Hunchback, and Whitehead, under Lieut.-Comdr. Flusser, engaged a large force of Confederates 6 hours. October 4, 1862. Capture of the defenses of Galveston, Texas, after slight resistance by Federal mortar flotilla under Comdr. W. B. Renshaw. November, 1862. November 4, 1862. Bark Sophia captured off N. C. c
Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 Chronological summary of important actions in which the Federal and Confederate navies were engaged, based on official records. Minor engagements are omitted; also joint operations where the army played the principal part. Mcorn captured. Commodore Vanderbilt's present to the government This side-wheel steamer was presented to the Government by Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt in 1861, when the navy was sorely in need of ships, and she was christened after the donor. In Hampton Roads she led one of the two columns of fighting-vessels of all sorississippi: one of the five river monitors built on Admiral Porter's enthusiastic recommendation, after he had officially examined the original Ericsson Monitor in 1861. August, 1864. August 5, 1864. Great battle at the entrance of Mobile Bay. The Confed. ram Tennessee captured after one of the fiercest naval battles
March, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 15
Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 Chronological summary of important actions in which the Federal and Confederate navies were engaged, based on official records. Minor engagements are omitted; also joint operations where the army played the principal part. March, 1861. March 20, 1861. Sloop Isabella, with provisions, for the Federal Navy-Yard at Pensacola, seized at Mobile by request of Gen. Bragg. April, 1861.March, 1861. March 20, 1861. Sloop Isabella, with provisions, for the Federal Navy-Yard at Pensacola, seized at Mobile by request of Gen. Bragg. April, 1861. April 17, 1861. Seizure of the U. S. transport Star of the West, at Indianola, by Texas troops under Col. Van Dorn. April 19, 1861. Ports of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas ordered blockaded by President Lincoln. April 20-21, 1861. Gosport Navy-Yard, Norfolk, Va., abandoned by Union officers in charge, and seized by Virginia State troops. April 27, 1861. Ports of Virginia and North Carolina included in the blockade.
March 20th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 15
Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 Chronological summary of important actions in which the Federal and Confederate navies were engaged, based on official records. Minor engagements are omitted; also joint operations where the army played the principal part. March, 1861. March 20, 1861. Sloop Isabella, with provisions, for the Federal Navy-Yard at Pensacola, seized at Mobile by request of Gen. Bragg. April, 1861. April 17, 1861. Seizure of the U. S. transport Star of the West, at Indianola, by Texas troops under Col. Van Dorn. April 19, 1861. Ports of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas ordered blockaded by President Lincoln. April 20-21, 1861. Gosport Navy-Yard, Norfolk, Va., abandoned by Union officers in charge, and seized by Virginia State troops. April 27, 1861. Ports of Virginia and North Carolina included in the blockade.
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...