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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ely from the desire of the authorities to insure the strictest secrecy for their movements. Obviously, any commander was pretty much at the mercy of the individual who copied the maps, charts, and the like for his Secret Service. Through an untrustworthy or careless employee the most zealously guarded secrets of contemplated destinations or routes might reach the adversary. The work of preparing these maps, therefore, was confided to Alexander Gardner, the brilliant Scotchman brought to America and instructed in the photographic art by Brady himself. He proved so trustworthy that he was permitted in his spare time to indulge his hobby of photographing the soldiers themselves—a useless hobby it seemed then, since there was no way of reproducing the pictures direct on the printed page. But Gardner, first and last an artist, worked so patiently and indefatigably that, before the campaign was over, he had secured thousands of outdoor views which, with the many that Brady took in 186
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 1
Introduction The two practical problems of the General Reading the distant message: an officer of the Federal Signal Corps How the Secret service gave rise to the complete photographic record of soldier life: photographer and soldier, 1862, as the armies paused after McClellan's attempt on Richmond It is quite astonishing to discover that the immense collection of photographs reflecting the soldier life of 1861-65 so intimately and vividly had its rise in secret-service work. It is literally true, however, that Alexander Gardner's privileges of photographing at headquarters and within the Federal lines, at a thousand historic spots and moments, resulted entirely from the desire of the authorities to insure the strictest secrecy for their movements. Obviously, any commander was pretty much at the mercy of the individual who copied the maps, charts, and the like for his Secret Service. Through an untrustworthy or careless employee the most zealously guarded secrets
Allan Pinkerton (search for this): chapter 1
is shared even by Brady, the indomitable little photographer. He stands (at the left of the right-hand section above) quietly gazing from beneath the brim of his straw hat—conspicuous among the dark forage caps and felts of the soldiers—in the same direction in which the officer is peering so eagerly through his field-glass. Brady appears twice again in the two lower photographs of the same locality and time. I knew Mr. Brady during that time, writes William A. Pinkerton, the son of Allan Pinkerton, who was in charge of the secret-service department throughout the war, but had no intimate acquaintanceship with him, he being a man and I being a boy, but I recollect his face and build as vividly to-day as I did then: a slim build, a man, I should judge, about five feet seven inches tall, dark complexion, dark moustache, and dark hair inclined to curl; wore glasses, was quick and nervous. You can verify by me that I saw a number of these negatives made myself. Matthew B. Brady
Secret Service (search for this): chapter 1
the soldier life of 1861-65 so intimately and vividly had its rise in secret-service work. It is literally true, however, that Alexander Gardner's privileges of photographing at headquarters and within the Federal lines, at a thousand historic spots and moments, resulted entirely from the desire of the authorities to insure the strictest secrecy for their movements. Obviously, any commander was pretty much at the mercy of the individual who copied the maps, charts, and the like for his Secret Service. Through an untrustworthy or careless employee the most zealously guarded secrets of contemplated destinations or routes might reach the adversary. The work of preparing these maps, therefore, was confided to Alexander Gardner, the brilliant Scotchman brought to America and instructed in the photographic art by Brady himself. He proved so trustworthy that he was permitted in his spare time to indulge his hobby of photographing the soldiers themselves—a useless hobby it seemed then, s
Matthew B. Brady (search for this): chapter 1
rica and instructed in the photographic art by Brady himself. He proved so trustworthy that he wasnds of outdoor views which, with the many that Brady took in 1861 and part of 1862, and later in thor through the Confederate lines. Three Brady photographs taken in Grant's last campaign. or lying down. The calmness is shared even by Brady, the indomitable little photographer. He stans peering so eagerly through his field-glass. Brady appears twice again in the two lower photographs of the same locality and time. I knew Mr. Brady during that time, writes William A. Pinkerton, ber of these negatives made myself. Matthew B. Brady under fire in the works before Petersburg: three of the Brady photographs taken in Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Grant's Brady photograph from Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Grant's last campaign.
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1
or views which, with the many that Brady took in 1861 and part of 1862, and later in the path of Grant's final campaign from the Wilderness to Richmond, form the nucleus of the collection presented hSouthern sympathizers, or through the Confederate lines. Three Brady photographs taken in Grant's last campaign. Shells were flying above the entrenchments before Petersburg at the time thethew B. Brady under fire in the works before Petersburg: three of the Brady photographs taken in Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Granfire in the works before Petersburg: three of the Brady photographs taken in Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Grant's last campaign. fire in the works before Petersburg: three of the Brady photographs taken in Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Grant's last campaign. Brady photograph from Grant's last campaign.
Alexander Gardner (search for this): chapter 1
life of 1861-65 so intimately and vividly had its rise in secret-service work. It is literally true, however, that Alexander Gardner's privileges of photographing at headquarters and within the Federal lines, at a thousand historic spots and momentted destinations or routes might reach the adversary. The work of preparing these maps, therefore, was confided to Alexander Gardner, the brilliant Scotchman brought to America and instructed in the photographic art by Brady himself. He proved solves—a useless hobby it seemed then, since there was no way of reproducing the pictures direct on the printed page. But Gardner, first and last an artist, worked so patiently and indefatigably that, before the campaign was over, he had secured thoufinal campaign from the Wilderness to Richmond, form the nucleus of the collection presented herewith. Needless to say, Gardner did not break faith with his employers or pass any of these photographs to Southern sympathizers, or through the Confede
William A. Pinkerton (search for this): chapter 1
ng or lying down. The calmness is shared even by Brady, the indomitable little photographer. He stands (at the left of the right-hand section above) quietly gazing from beneath the brim of his straw hat—conspicuous among the dark forage caps and felts of the soldiers—in the same direction in which the officer is peering so eagerly through his field-glass. Brady appears twice again in the two lower photographs of the same locality and time. I knew Mr. Brady during that time, writes William A. Pinkerton, the son of Allan Pinkerton, who was in charge of the secret-service department throughout the war, but had no intimate acquaintanceship with him, he being a man and I being a boy, but I recollect his face and build as vividly to-day as I did then: a slim build, a man, I should judge, about five feet seven inches tall, dark complexion, dark moustache, and dark hair inclined to curl; wore glasses, was quick and nervous. You can verify by me that I saw a number of these negatives made
mplete photographic record of soldier life: photographer and soldier, 1862, as the armies paused after McClellan's attempt on Richmond It is quite astonishing to discover that the immense collection of photographs reflecting the soldier life of 1861-65 so intimately and vividly had its rise in secret-service work. It is literally true, however, that Alexander Gardner's privileges of photographing at headquarters and within the Federal lines, at a thousand historic spots and moments, resultedeproducing the pictures direct on the printed page. But Gardner, first and last an artist, worked so patiently and indefatigably that, before the campaign was over, he had secured thousands of outdoor views which, with the many that Brady took in 1861 and part of 1862, and later in the path of Grant's final campaign from the Wilderness to Richmond, form the nucleus of the collection presented herewith. Needless to say, Gardner did not break faith with his employers or pass any of these photogr
Introduction The two practical problems of the General Reading the distant message: an officer of the Federal Signal Corps How the Secret service gave rise to the complete photographic record of soldier life: photographer and soldier, 1862, as the armies paused after McClellan's attempt on Richmond It is quite astonishing to discover that the immense collection of photographs reflecting the soldier life of 1861-65 so intimately and vividly had its rise in secret-service work. Itctures direct on the printed page. But Gardner, first and last an artist, worked so patiently and indefatigably that, before the campaign was over, he had secured thousands of outdoor views which, with the many that Brady took in 1861 and part of 1862, and later in the path of Grant's final campaign from the Wilderness to Richmond, form the nucleus of the collection presented herewith. Needless to say, Gardner did not break faith with his employers or pass any of these photographs to Southern
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