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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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36— loss, 1,321. The total loss was thus 40,121. Maine's contribution of more than 11 per cent. of its population took the form of two regiments of cavalry, one regiment of heavy artillery, seven batteries of light artillery, one battalion and a company of sharpshooters, with thirty-three regiments, one battalion, and seven companies of infantry. The Second Maine fought with the Army of the Potomac until the battle of Chancellorsville, May 1 to 5, 1863. The regiment was ordered home on the 20th of that month, and the three-years men were transferred to the Twentieth Maine Infantry. The regiment was mustered out June 9, 1863, having lost four officers and 135 enlisted men, killed or mortally wounded, and by disease. The first Rhode Island infantry leaving providence April 20, 1861. The sidewalks were filled with cheering throngs, and unbounded enthusiasm greeted the volunteers, as the first division of the First Regiment of Detached Rhode Island Militia left Providence for Was
Connecticut, 55,864—loss, 5,354; and Rhode Island, 23,236— loss, 1,321. The total loss was thus 40,121. Maine's contribution of more than 11 per cent. of its population took the form of two regiments of cavalry, one regiment of heavy artillery, seven batteries of light artillery, one battalion and a company of sharpshooters, with thirty-three regiments, one battalion, and seven companies of infantry. The Second Maine fought with the Army of the Potomac until the battle of Chancellorsville, May 1 to 5, 1863. The regiment was ordered home on the 20th of that month, and the three-years men were transferred to the Twentieth Maine Infantry. The regiment was mustered out June 9, 1863, having lost four officers and 135 enlisted men, killed or mortally wounded, and by disease. The first Rhode Island infantry leaving providence April 20, 1861. The sidewalks were filled with cheering throngs, and unbounded enthusiasm greeted the volunteers, as the first division of the First Regiment
nest public servants. Marshalling the Federal volunteers Officer and sergeant in 1861 men of the sixth Vermont near Washington A hollow-square maneuver for the new soldiers This regiment was organized at Bangor, Me., for three months service, and left the State for Willett's Point, N. Y., May 14, 1861. Such was the enthusiasm of the moment that it was mustered into the United States service, part for two and part for three years, May 28, 1861. It moved to Washington on May 30th. The first Camp of the regiment was on Meridian till, near Washington, till July 1st. The live-long days were spent in constant drill, drill, drill during this period. McClellan was fashioning the new levies into an army. The total population of the Northern States in 1860 was 21,184,305. New England's population was 3,135,283, or about one-seventh of the whole. New England's troops numbered 363,162, over one-tenth of its population, practically one-seventh the total muster of forces r
geant in 1861 men of the sixth Vermont near Washington A hollow-square maneuver for the new soldiers This regiment was organized at Bangor, Me., for three months service, and left the State for Willett's Point, N. Y., May 14, 1861. Such was the enthusiasm of the moment that it was mustered into the United States service, part for two and part for three years, May 28, 1861. It moved to Washington on May 30th. The first Camp of the regiment was on Meridian till, near Washington, till July 1st. The live-long days were spent in constant drill, drill, drill during this period. McClellan was fashioning the new levies into an army. The total population of the Northern States in 1860 was 21,184,305. New England's population was 3,135,283, or about one-seventh of the whole. New England's troops numbered 363,162, over one-tenth of its population, practically one-seventh the total muster of forces raised in the North during the war, namely, 2,778,304. The New England population was
1861, to August, the regiment lost one officer and sixteen enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and eight enlisted men by disease. Third Connecticut infantry, Camp Douglas, 1861 Only one day after the First Regiment of Connecticut Infantry started from Hartford—May 18, 1861—the Second and Third left New Haven for the great camps that encircled Washington. All three of these threemonths regiments took part in the battle of Bull Run, and all three were mustered out by the middle of August. This was one of the first steps by which the fighting men of the North were finding themselves. Connecticut sent a regiment of cavalry, two regiments of heavy artillery, three batteries of light artillery, and thirty regiments of infantry to the front in the course of the war. Two of the latter, the Twenty-ninth and the Thirtieth, were colored regiments. The company of the Third in the photograph looks quite natty in its dark blue uniforms. These men have not yet heard the crash of a Co
August 12th (search for this): chapter 3
y, three batteries of light artillery, and thirty regiments of infantry to the front in the course of the war. Two of the latter, the Twenty-ninth and the Thirtieth, were colored regiments. The company of the Third in the photograph looks quite natty in its dark blue uniforms. These men have not yet heard the crash of a Confederate volley, but they are soon to do so on the disastrous field of Bull Run. They served almost three months, being mustered in on May 14, 1861, and mustered out August 12th. Officers of the ninth Massachusetts infantry at Camp Cass, 1861 A little over two months before this regiment left Boston for Washington, the Sixth Massachusetts had been defending itself against the mob in the streets of Baltimore, April 19, 1861. Massachusetts poured regiment after regiment to the front until seventy-one regiments had answered President Lincoln's calls. Besides the infantry, Massachusetts sent five regiments and three battalions of cavalry, four regiments, a bat
ds of home consumption. In January, 1862, the Confederate quartermaster- Federal army wagons from the Potomac to the Mississippi At Belle Plain, at Centerville, Virginia, and at Baton Rouge appear the omnipresent army wagons, which followed the armies from Washington to the Gulf. The dimensions of the box of these useful vehicles were as follows: Length (inside), 120 inches; width (inside), 43 inches; height, 22 inches. Such a wagon could carry a load weighing about 2536 pounds, or 1500 rations of hard bread, coffee, sugar, and salt. Each wagon was drawn by a team of four horses or six mules. Federal army wagons from the Potomac to the Mississippi Federal army wagons from the Potomac to the Mississippi Federal army wagons from the Potomac to the Mississippi The bivouac—wagon-train at Cumberland landing, Pamunkey river general complained that the railroad lines on which his Government was dependent for transportation, were operating only two trains a day each
e for Willett's Point, N. Y., May 14, 1861. Such was the enthusiasm of the moment that it was mustered into the United States service, part for two and part for three years, May 28, 1861. It moved to Washington on May 30th. The first Camp of the regiment was on Meridian till, near Washington, till July 1st. The live-long days were spent in constant drill, drill, drill during this period. McClellan was fashioning the new levies into an army. The total population of the Northern States in 1860 was 21,184,305. New England's population was 3,135,283, or about one-seventh of the whole. New England's troops numbered 363,162, over one-tenth of its population, practically one-seventh the total muster of forces raised in the North during the war, namely, 2,778,304. The New England population was distributed as follows: Maine, 628,279; Massachusetts, 1,231,066; Vermont, 315,098; New Hampshire, 326,073; Connecticut, 460,147, and Rhode Island, 174,620. The number of troops that these Sta
of the war was 30,635—about one-eighth of what it was in 1910. The railroads of 1861 connected the Mississippi valley with the seaboard, it is true, but they had notand while the prices of almost all commodities rose far above the price-level of 1861, transportation rates, so far as the Government was concerned, remained uniform rvants. Marshalling the Federal volunteers Officer and sergeant in 1861 men of the sixth Vermont near Washington A hollow-square maneuver for the newnded, and 3 officers and 212 men by disease. Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: IVermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont
April, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 3
Above his head to the right is the rude sign: Welcome home. The little State of Rhode Island contributed three regiments and a battalion of cavalry, three regiments of heavy artillery, ten batteries of light artillery, twelve regiments of infantry, and an independent company of hospital guards to the Union cause. The first Rhode Island was a three-months regiment which was mustered out August 2, 1861. This photograph shows the young officers after the Union disaster at Bull Run. From April, 1861, to August, the regiment lost one officer and sixteen enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and eight enlisted men by disease. Third Connecticut infantry, Camp Douglas, 1861 Only one day after the First Regiment of Connecticut Infantry started from Hartford—May 18, 1861—the Second and Third left New Haven for the great camps that encircled Washington. All three of these threemonths regiments took part in the battle of Bull Run, and all three were mustered out by the middle of A
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