hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Tecumseh Sherman 118 2 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 105 1 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 96 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 78 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 72 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 72 0 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 72 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 68 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 64 0 Browse Search
Ulysses Simpson Grant 62 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller).

Found 4,064 total hits in 1,413 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
nly five years after his Eulogy of Sumner, this photograph preserves the noble features of Lamar as he stood before the House of Representatives in 1874. He was born in Georgia in 1825, studied at Emory College in that State, graduating at twenty; and soon began the practice of law. In a few years he moved to Oxford, Mississippi, where he became a professor of mathematics in the State University, and continued his legal practice. His reputation as a speaker dates from 1851, when he met Senator Foote in joint debate and borne from the platform in triumph by the students of the University. Six years later he went to Congress from that district. During the war he served in the army until his health gave way, when he was sent as commissioner to Russia. In 1872 he was elected to Congress. Two years later, he was the best known Southerner in Washington because of his Eulogy of Sumner. From 1877 to 1885 he represented Mississippi in the Senate. In 1885 he became Secretary of the Interi
John B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 1
and swapping between the pickets and between the lines became so prevalent before the war closed as to cause no comment and attract no special attention. General John B. Gordon declares, I should, perhaps, not exaggerate the number or importance of these evidences if I said that there were thousands of them which are perhaps the The most conspicuous Southern leader in the progress of nationalization was Henry W. Grady, of Georgia. His father, a Confederate soldier on the staff of General Gordon, met his death at Petersburg in the attack on Fort Stedman only two weeks before the surrender at Appomattox. Yet the son looked back on the conflict with nohe Confederate armies on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the great battle. Some three thousand old soldiers were in attendance. The well-known Georgian, General John B. Gordon, delivered an earnest and eloquent address. The New Englander, George William Curtis, followed him. One who was present reports that his tribute to Confe
Stonewall (search for this): chapter 1
, which can be overcome only by finding the inevitable phrase. Weak-winged is song when compared with actual achievement, unless it rush forth from genuine enthusiasm and fine feeling. But the silent, impassive Grant and the quiet, chivalrous Lee have furnished small personal impulse to poetic flight. No cause for regret in this; they need no imperishable literature to prolong their fame to a busy and forgetful posterity. Their deeds are their fittest memorial. The like may be said of Stonewall Jackson, although his picturesque campaigns have been sung in the vivid, rousing stanzas of Palmer's Stonewall Jackson's way. Yet it remains true that fine feeling has usually been touched by the thought of men now overshadowed, of some Zollicoffer, or Ashby, or Pelham. The greatest figure of the war has received a more enduring commemoration. Indeed, Lincoln has inspired the finest imaginative product of the period. Walt Whitman's mystic dirge, When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloom'
th unites with the North in paying tribute to his memory. He saved the Union. For this triumph-and time has shown it to be a triumph for the South as well as the North-he is entitled to, and will receive, the grateful tribute of the millions who in the course of time will crowd this continent with a hundred imperial States, and spread to the world the blessings of republican freedom. Grant's thankfulness for the spirit of brotherhood was shared by the survivors of the hosts he led. From July 2 to 4, 1887, was held the most impressive celebration of the decade, the joint meeting on the field of Gettysburg of the survivors of the Philadelphia brigade of the Union army and of Pickett's division of the Confederate army. As part of the program, it was intended to return the Confederate standards captured by the Pennsylvania troops. The plan failed because of the political turmoil of the time, but the failure did not lessen the heartiness of the good feeling that characterized the occ
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 1
the amber of fit poetic form, these achievements shine with no trace of sectional pride. The charge of Kearny at the battle of Fair Oaks, or Seven Pines, as sung in Stedman's ringing verse, is familiar to many who have never read a military account of the battle, and cannot tell whether it occurred in the first or the last year of the war. Ticknor's ballad on the touching devotion of Little Giffen of Tennessee will likewise go straight to the hearts of thousands who may never learn whether Johnston was a Northern or a Southern leader. Such instances demonstrate the capacity of the American citizen for heroism, and the poetic record of his daring should be enshrined in memory as the heritage of a reunited people. Those greater incidents known as battles have been made the subject of numerous poetic efforts. Virtually every important battle and many a minor engagement were seized upon by the chroniclers in verse. Some of these descriptions are spirited, and the greater combats hav
Sidney Lanier (search for this): chapter 1
urned from the colossal struggle. The large, sweet soul that has gone Sidney Lanier in 1879 Sidney Lanier's war poems The death of Stonewall Jackson and TheSidney Lanier's war poems The death of Stonewall Jackson and The Tournament appear in this volume. Lanier was born in Macon, Georgia, February 3, 1842. In early childhood he developed a passion for music, learning to play on maLanier was born in Macon, Georgia, February 3, 1842. In early childhood he developed a passion for music, learning to play on many instruments without instruction. At eighteen he graduated from Oglethorpe University with the highest honors in his class. Soon after the war broke out he marche and the Bermudas, which was captured in November of the same year. Thereafter Lanier was imprisoned for four months in City Point Prison, Maryland. On securing hisal cantata for this national occasion was conferred upon the Southern poet, Sidney Lanier. The cantata, composed for Dudley Buck's music, was sung in the open air, en nobly rendered. The same glorification of American freedom was expressed by Lanier in the freer poetic form of the Psalm of the West, and by including the revised
de has recognized the intrepid valor that gave undying fame to those heights of sacrifice. Nothing in verse so grandly simple as Lincoln's address has been produced, but Will Thompson's The high Tide at Gettysburg is an inspiring description of Pickett's charge, James Russell Lowell in 1863 The poet who recited his ode at the Harvard Commemoration looked thus on that memorable occasion. He was born in 1819 at Cambridge, Massachusetts, of a long line of eminent New Englanders. In Harvd was shared by the survivors of the hosts he led. From July 2 to 4, 1887, was held the most impressive celebration of the decade, the joint meeting on the field of Gettysburg of the survivors of the Philadelphia brigade of the Union army and of Pickett's division of the Confederate army. As part of the program, it was intended to return the Confederate standards captured by the Pennsylvania troops. The plan failed because of the political turmoil of the time, but the failure did not lessen t
eginning to clear for a broader and more generous view of Reconstruction. That the leading spirits of the South were not behindhand in these sentiments was made abundantly evident by one of the most notable orations ever delivered in the House of Representatives. Charles Sumner, it will be remembered, had been foremost among the leaders in the negro legislation of Congress. Yet it was on the death of Charles Sumner that L. Q. C. Lamar, congressman from Mississippi, melted the members Lucius Q C. Lamar in 1879 Taken only five years after his Eulogy of Sumner, this photograph preserves the noble features of Lamar as he stood before the House of Representatives in 1874. He was born in Georgia in 1825, studied at Emory College in that State, graduating at twenty; and soon began the practice of law. In a few years he moved to Oxford, Mississippi, where he became a professor of mathematics in the State University, and continued his legal practice. His reputation as a speaker dat
forever. It at the same time recorded its belief that the great American heart can neither be misled nor deterred. It has determined that there shall be peace. . . . The war is over; its results are fixed; its passions are dead, and its heroism and sacrifices have bound this people together as they were never bound before. It was, then, no exaggeration for that eminent Mississippian, L. Q. C. Lamar, in his oration at Charleston, the center of secession, at the unveiling of the statue of Calhoun, the apostle of States' rights, to declare that the appeal to arms in 1861 guaranteed and established the indissolubility of the American Union and the universality of American freedom. How true this was proving was demonstrated in 1898 by the War with Spain. That ninety days expedition was more influential than any other one event in drawing North and South into relations of exultant brotherhood. Congress re- Richard Watson Gilder as a cadet of the war days Born in Bordentown,
James Ryder Randall the author of My Maryland, at twenty-two In 1861, just as he looked when he wrote his famous battle-cry, My Maryland, James Ryder Randall, the youthful poet, faces the reader. Randall was born in Baltimore the first day of 1839. His early schooling was under Joseph H. Clark, a former teacher of Edgar Allan Poe. At Georgetown College he was the smallest boy that had ever been received as a student. After becoming known as the poet of the college, he traveled extensivelythe lighter vein of his versifying. The Aged stranger is purposely humorous. John Burns of Gettysburg is half-humorous. A Second review of the Grand Army has touches of wit in spite of its solemn subject. Harte was born in Albany, New York, in 1839. The gold-fever caught him at fifteen; he wandered to California, where he made more at school-teaching than at gold-digging. At eighteen, he entered newspaper life as a typesetter, and soon worked up to the position of editor-in-chief of the We
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...