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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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rs beside a sutler's store. Few photographic feats are as difficult, even to-day, as the successful portraying of such a number of different subjects, in poses so remarkably diversified, and under such abrupt color contrasts of light and shadow. Evidently, the army was in a permanent Camp when this picture was taken; for it was then that the sutlers would open up their stocks of canned goods, soft drinks, playing cards, handkerchiefs, paper collars, and such luxuries, enjoyed by the boys of 1861 only at infrequent intervals. Sometimes the soldiers rebelled against the storekeeper's extortionate prices, and once in a while, on the eve of a forward movement, they would sack the little shanty of its contents by way of reprisal. Camp humor: Facetiousness of a sutler with the western armies The signs about this sutler's store in Tennessee display the rude wit of the soldier in camp. The name over the little shanty contains an affectation of French elegance that is amusing even t
n birth and training, had established himself in literary work in New York when the war broke out. He enlisted in a three months regiment and continued on the staff of different officers, where he attracted attention for his executive ability. In 1862 he was on the staff of General David Hunter at Hilton head, South Carolina. General Hunter organized the first regiment of negro troops to be mustered into the Federal service. This proceeding created serious alarm in Congress, and great excitemeesh supplies of men, the proposition was more than once brought up in the Confederate Congress and elsewhere for the arming of the slaves or of a selection of the slaves. But such a step was never ventured upon. On the Northern side, as early as 1862, regiments were formed of the colored residents of the North, the first two being the famous Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Massachusetts. These men represented, of course, a fairly high average of intelligence and of education, and they did brilli
twenty-four, just released from Point Lookout prison, put into the passage quoted (from his novel, Tiger Lilies) the kind of humor which appears in the familiar song and which had sustained Lee's ragged veterans during the preceding four hard years. (see page 188) Imposing officers and foreign attaches who unbend between battles—Falmouth, Virginia, April, 1863 Lest the reader suppose the life of the Civil War soldier was unrelieved by any sallies of playfulness, these photographs of 1863 are reproduced. No schoolboys in their wildest larks could engage in a struggle of more mock-desperate nature than that waged by these officers of the Army of the Potomac, with the English, French, and Austrian attaches come to report to their Governments how Americans made war. Boxes and chairs have been scattered hither and yon; swords are slashing in deadly combat; bottles are wielded by some in the hand-to-hand melee. The burly attache at the right is even preparing to dig a grave for t
April, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
man, who had worked for Grant Some three years before the war. Francis Bret Harte. Gay and happy still The ex-confederate of twenty-four, just released from Point Lookout prison, put into the passage quoted (from his novel, Tiger Lilies) the kind of humor which appears in the familiar song and which had sustained Lee's ragged veterans during the preceding four hard years. (see page 188) Imposing officers and foreign attaches who unbend between battles—Falmouth, Virginia, April, 1863 Lest the reader suppose the life of the Civil War soldier was unrelieved by any sallies of playfulness, these photographs of 1863 are reproduced. No schoolboys in their wildest larks could engage in a struggle of more mock-desperate nature than that waged by these officers of the Army of the Potomac, with the English, French, and Austrian attaches come to report to their Governments how Americans made war. Boxes and chairs have been scattered hither and yon; swords are slashing in dea
October, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
bservation or for precision of statement. An enormous allowance had to be made for his imagination when he was describing to us the number of the enemy's troops that were in position or that possibly were advancing to the attack. His imagination worked most frequently on the apprehensive side. His experience had made hopefulness somewhat difficult for him. Contraban Unexpected civility The following incident, which occurred soon after General Grant's arrival at Chattanooga in October, 1863, is related by General Horace Porter in his entertaining and valuable reminiscences, Campaigning with Grant: As soon as communication had been opened with our base of supplies, General Grant manifested an eagerness to acquaint himself minutely with the position of the enemy, with a view to taking the offensive. One morning he started toward our right, with several staff officers, to make a personal examination of that portion of the line. When he came in sight of Chattanooga Creek,
Chapter 7: the lighter side Sambo's right to be kilt: colored troops at drill—Vicksburg, 1864. To illustrate Sambo's right to be kilt: guard of colored troops at the provost-marshal's—Beaufort, North Carolina, 1864 A beautiful Southern mansion stands in flickering shadows of walnut and elm and white oak, and in, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. ‘And his eye runs Sthraight on the barrel sights’ These Negro pickets near Dutch Gap Canal in 1864 were posing proudly for their photograph, unconscious that they were illustrating Halpine's line so closely. The natural love of the Negro for imitating the whiteinually firing at the men from tree-tops, and several mortars were continually dropping bombs among the squads, who had to seek refuge in dug-outs. In the fall of 1864 most of the labor was performed by colored troops. General P. S. Michie reports that they ‘displayed the greatest courage and fortitude, and maintained under t
April 3rd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 8
n a liver that's wake ana white. Though Sambo's black as the ace of spades, His finger a thrigger can pull, And his eye runs sthraight on the barrel-sights From undher its thatch of wool. So hear me all, boys darlina, Don't think I'm tippina you chaff, The right to be kilt we'll divide wid him, And give him the largest half! Charles Graham Halpine. The year of jubilee According to common report a body of negro troops sang these words as they entered Richmond on the morning of April 3, 1865. George Cary Eggleston adds a special interest to the song: it is an interesting fact, illustrative of the elasticity of spirit shown by the losers in the great contest, that the song, which might have been supposed to be peculiarly offensive to their wounded pride and completely out of harmony with their deep depression and chagrin, became at once a favorite among them, and was sung with applause by young men and maidens in well nigh every house in Virginia. Say, darkeys, hab you s
Americans (search for this): chapter 8
Imposing officers and foreign attaches who unbend between battles—Falmouth, Virginia, April, 1863 Lest the reader suppose the life of the Civil War soldier was unrelieved by any sallies of playfulness, these photographs of 1863 are reproduced. No schoolboys in their wildest larks could engage in a struggle of more mock-desperate nature than that waged by these officers of the Army of the Potomac, with the English, French, and Austrian attaches come to report to their Governments how Americans made war. Boxes and chairs have been scattered hither and yon; swords are slashing in deadly combat; bottles are wielded by some in the hand-to-hand melee. The burly attache at the right is even preparing to dig a grave for the unfortunate slain in the combat. At the sutler's store: a lifelike group A high degree of artistic feeling and skill was shown by the war photographer who preserved this band of joking soldiers beside a sutler's store. Few photographic feats are as difficu
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 8
ana run away. De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. Henry Clay Work. Negro teamsters near Butler's signal tower, Bermuda hundred, 1864 The history and nature of contraband of war, so expressively illustrated by this photograph, are thus explained by George Haven Putnam: Early in the war, General Benjamin F. Butler invented the term contraband, which came to be accepted as the most convenient classification for the colored refugee who had made his way within the Federal lines and who, while no longer a slave or a piece of property, was not yet accepted as a person. It was the legal theory of Butler that the property rights in the refugee who had been a slave had, under war conditions, been annulled. Throughout the war, the information of happenings within the enemy's lines was frequently enough brought to our headquarters by the (more or less) intelligent contraband. As far as my experience goes, the colored r
r For to keep it while he gone. Dar's wine and cider in de kitchin, Ana de darkeys dey hab some, I spec it will be all fiscated When de Lincum sojers come. De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. De oberseer he makes us trubble, Ana he dribe us rouna a spell, We lock him up in de smoke-house cellar, Wid de key flung in de well. De whip am lost, de hana — cuff broke, But de massy hab his pay; He big ana ole enough for to know better Dan to went ana run away. De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. Henry Clay Work. Negro teamsters near Butler's signal tower, Bermuda hundred, 1864 The history and nature of contraband of war, so expressively illustrated by this photograph, are thus explained by George Haven Putnam: Early in the war, General Benjamin F. Butler invented the term contraband, which came to be accepted as the most convenient classification for t
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