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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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P. S. Michie (search for this): chapter 8
g Halpine's line so closely. The natural love of the Negro for imitating the white folks was not the only trait that distinguished the colored troops at Dutch Gap. Work on the canal proved to be very dangerous. The Confederate sharpshooters in the vicinity were continually firing at the men from tree-tops, and several mortars were continually dropping bombs among the squads, who had to seek refuge in dug-outs. In the fall of 1864 most of the labor was performed by colored troops. General P. S. Michie reports that they ‘displayed the greatest courage and fortitude, and maintained under the most trying circumstances their usual good humor and cheerful disposition.’ Such a record may encourage their well-wishers. He six foot one way ana two foot todder, Ana he weigh six hundred pouna; His coat so big he couldn't pay de tailor, Ana it won't reach half way rouna; He drill so much dey calls him cap'n, Ana he git so mighty tanned, I spec he'll try to fool dem Yankees, For to tink he con
r For to keep it while he gone. Dar's wine and cider in de kitchin, Ana de darkeys dey hab some, I spec it will be all fiscated When de Lincum sojers come. De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. De oberseer he makes us trubble, Ana he dribe us rouna a spell, We lock him up in de smoke-house cellar, Wid de key flung in de well. De whip am lost, de hana — cuff broke, But de massy hab his pay; He big ana ole enough for to know better Dan to went ana run away. De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. Henry Clay Work. Negro teamsters near Butler's signal tower, Bermuda hundred, 1864 The history and nature of contraband of war, so expressively illustrated by this photograph, are thus explained by George Haven Putnam: Early in the war, General Benjamin F. Butler invented the term contraband, which came to be accepted as the most convenient classification for t
Francis Bret Harte (search for this): chapter 8
Nay, speak the truth, whatever it be, Though it rend my bosom's core. ‘How fell he,—with his face to the foe, Upholding the flag he bore? Oh, say not that my boy disgraced The uniform that he wore!’ ‘I cannot tell,’ said the aged man, ‘And should have remarked before, That I was with Grant,—in Illinois,— Some three years before the war.’ Then the farmer spake him never a word, But beat with his fist full sore That aged man, who had worked for Grant Some three years before the war. Francis Bret Harte. Gay and happy still The ex-confederate of twenty-four, just released from Point Lookout prison, put into the passage quoted (from his novel, Tiger Lilies) the kind of humor which appears in the familiar song and which had sustained Lee's ragged veterans during the preceding four hard years. (see page 188) Imposing officers and foreign attaches who unbend between battles—Falmouth, Virginia, April, 1863 Lest the reader suppose the life of the Civil War sol
the staff of different officers, where he attracted attention for his executive ability. In 1862 he was on the staff of General David Hunter at Hilton head, South Carolina. General Hunter organized the first regiment of negro troops to be mustered into the Federal service. This proceeding created serious alarm in Congress, and great excitement over the country. Halpine contributed this humorous treatment of the contested subject to the New York Herald over the signature of private miles O'Reilly. Some tell us 'tis a burnina shame To make the naygers fight; Ana that the thrade of beina kilt Belongs but to the white: But as for me, upon my sowl! So liberal are we here, I'll let Sambo be murthered instead of myself On every day in the year. On every day in the year, boys, And in every hour of the day; The right to be kilt I'll divide wid him, Ana divil a word I'll say. In battle's wild commotion I shouldn't at all object If Sambo's body should stop a ball That was comina for me direct
Henry Clay Work (search for this): chapter 8
incum sojers come. De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. De oberseer he makes us trubble, Ana he dribe us rouna a spell, We lock him up in de smoke-house cellar, Wid de key flung in de well. De whip am lost, de hana — cuff broke, But de massy hab his pay; He big ana ole enough for to know better Dan to went ana run away. De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho! It mus' be now de kingdum comina, Ana de yar ob jubilo. Henry Clay Work. Negro teamsters near Butler's signal tower, Bermuda hundred, 1864 The history and nature of contraband of war, so expressively illustrated by this photograph, are thus explained by George Haven Putnam: Early in the war, General Benjamin F. Butler invented the term contraband, which came to be accepted as the most convenient classification for the colored refugee who had made his way within the Federal lines and who, while no longer a slave or a piece of property, was not yet acce
Tiger Lilies (search for this): chapter 8
graced The uniform that he wore!’ ‘I cannot tell,’ said the aged man, ‘And should have remarked before, That I was with Grant,—in Illinois,— Some three years before the war.’ Then the farmer spake him never a word, But beat with his fist full sore That aged man, who had worked for Grant Some three years before the war. Francis Bret Harte. Gay and happy still The ex-confederate of twenty-four, just released from Point Lookout prison, put into the passage quoted (from his novel, Tiger Lilies) the kind of humor which appears in the familiar song and which had sustained Lee's ragged veterans during the preceding four hard years. (see page 188) Imposing officers and foreign attaches who unbend between battles—Falmouth, Virginia, April, 1863 Lest the reader suppose the life of the Civil War soldier was unrelieved by any sallies of playfulness, these photographs of 1863 are reproduced. No schoolboys in their wildest larks could engage in a struggle of more mock-
Artemas Ward (search for this): chapter 8
t are some of the negro troops that have been formed from contrabands. The passions of the period waxed particularly bitter over the question of employing Negroes in warfare. Charles Graham Halpine comes to the rescue, in his poem that follows on page 176, with a saving sense of Irish humor. He suggests that men who object to Sambo should take his place and fight. As for himself, he will object not at all if Sambo's body should stop a ball that was coming for me direct. This recalls Artemas Ward's announcement of his own patriotism, which he said he had carried so far that he was willing for all his wife's relatives to go to the front! The human side of this problem helps to solve it, as with others. Certainly, the line above presents a firm and soldierly front. Many of the colored regiments came to be well-disciplined and serviceable. Their bravery is attested by the loss of life at Battery Wagner and in the charges at the Petersburg crater. The lighter side: Sambo's ri
Charles Graham Halpine (search for this): chapter 8
the period waxed particularly bitter over the question of employing Negroes in warfare. Charles Graham Halpine comes to the rescue, in his poem that follows on page 176, with a saving sense of Irish ghter side: Sambo's right to be kilt This effusion has a curious historical value. Charles Graham Halpine, an Irishman in birth and training, had established himself in literary work in New Yorkce. This proceeding created serious alarm in Congress, and great excitement over the country. Halpine contributed this humorous treatment of the contested subject to the New York Herald over the siyou chaff, The right to be kilt we'll divide wid him, And give him the largest half! Charles Graham Halpine. The year of jubilee According to common report a body of negro troops sang theCanal in 1864 were posing proudly for their photograph, unconscious that they were illustrating Halpine's line so closely. The natural love of the Negro for imitating the white folks was not the onl
George Cary Eggleston (search for this): chapter 8
e ana white. Though Sambo's black as the ace of spades, His finger a thrigger can pull, And his eye runs sthraight on the barrel-sights From undher its thatch of wool. So hear me all, boys darlina, Don't think I'm tippina you chaff, The right to be kilt we'll divide wid him, And give him the largest half! Charles Graham Halpine. The year of jubilee According to common report a body of negro troops sang these words as they entered Richmond on the morning of April 3, 1865. George Cary Eggleston adds a special interest to the song: it is an interesting fact, illustrative of the elasticity of spirit shown by the losers in the great contest, that the song, which might have been supposed to be peculiarly offensive to their wounded pride and completely out of harmony with their deep depression and chagrin, became at once a favorite among them, and was sung with applause by young men and maidens in well nigh every house in Virginia. Say, darkeys, hab you seen de massa, Wid de
Sidney Lanier (search for this): chapter 8
have been wont to beg Heaven as its greatest boon to man, not to let the cavalry ride over us without waking us up to see 'em do it—but now do sleep between white sheets without fear of aught but losing our senses from sleeping so intensely: and whereas, finally, all these things are contrary to the ordinary course of nature and are not known save as dim recollections of a previous state of existence in itself extremely hypothetical, therefore, be it resolved and it is hereby resolved: Unanimously, from the five. That this-figure-at present on this horse and clothed with these sumptuous paraphernalia of pompous war, is not B. Chauncey Flemington, that is to say (to borrow a term from the German metaphysics) is Not-Me, that this horse is not my horse, this paraphernalia not my paraphernalia, that para-ditto not your para-ditto, that this road is no road, and the whole affair a dream or phantasmagory of the Devil for no purpose but to embitter the waking from it. Sidney Lanier
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