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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 335 total hits in 103 results.

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George Brinton McClellan (search for this): chapter 2
of the formulas with which his name was associated: no terms except unconditional and immediate surrender, and I propose to move immediately upon your works. this met the temper of the time, impatient of strategy and paper plans and demanding tangible results. the circumstances which led to Grant's resignation from the army, July 31, 1854, however they might have been explained by those who knew him best, had created a distrust of him in the minds of his military superiors, Halleck and McClellan, so that he was left wholly dependent upon works accomplished for his recognition by the North and at Washington. He neither sought nor obtained favor from his superiors; he made no complaint of insufficient support, as so many did, but doggedly pursued a consistent course of doing the best he could with what the War Department placed at his disposal, learning from his successes and profiting by his mistakes as well as by those of the foe. there was one who was superior to this profess
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 2
se, though this youthful romance ended in the disillusion which often attends such experiences. And it was this man, whose personal characteristics were all so unlike those distinguishing the remorseless conqueror, slaughtering men for glory's sake, who was selected from among the heroes of our great domestic strife for the appellation of butcher. No one of them less deserved this title, for none of them accomplished as great results with a less proportionate loss of life. The repulse of Lee at Gettysburg, in 1863, was obtained at a cost of 23,000 casualties—3155 killed, 14,529 wounded, 5365 missing—and at the end Lee marched with his army from the field of battle. The more complete victory at Vicksburg, with the surrender of Pemberton's entire army of 30,000 men, was obtained by Grant with a casualty list of only 9362, including about 450 missing. Heavy as were the losses during the year which preceded the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, they were less than the a
George Henry Thomas (search for this): chapter 2
—but calm and imperturbable as of old, with his crumpled army hat, plain blouse, his trousers tucked into his boot-tops, and the inevitable cigar, Ulysses S. Grant stands at a historic spot. Less than a week before, when the Union soldiers under Thomas, still smarting from their experience at Chickamauga, stood gazing at the Confederate works behind which rose the crest of Missionary Ridge, the Stars and Stripes were thrown to the breeze on the crest of Lookout Mountain. Eager hands pointed, and a great cheer went up from the Army of the Cumberland. They knew that the Union troops with Hooker had carried the day in their battle above the clouds. That was the 25th of November, 1863; and that same afternoon the soldiers of Thomas swarmed over the crest of Missionary Ridge while Grant himself looked on and wondered. When a few days later Grant visited the spot whence the flag was waved, an enterprising photographer, already on the spot, preserved the striking scene. Seated with his
John A. Rawlins (search for this): chapter 2
terprising photographer, already on the spot, preserved the striking scene. Seated with his back against a tree, General J. A. Rawlins gazes at his leader. Behind him stands General Webster, and leaning against the tree is Colonel Clark B. Lagow. no perceptible anxiety, but gave his orders with coolness and deliberation. At the left of the photograph sits General John A. Rawlins, who has foresworn his customary mustache and beard which the next picture shows him as wearing. He was first ater was superintendent at West Point some years before the war. In the lower photograph General Grant stands between General Rawlins and Colonel Bowers. The veins standing out on the back of his hand are plainly visible. No one but he could have tly the blood coursed through them during the four tremendous years. Men about to witness Appomattox Grant between Rawlins and Bowers During his stormy period of civil administration, Grant was like a landsman tossing upon an angry sea wh
Henry Ward Beecher (search for this): chapter 2
to bring the War to a successful end and become the head of the nation. Grant's sturdy, persistent Scottish ancestry stood him in good stead. He was a descendant of Matthew Grant, one of the settlers of Windsor, Connecticut, in 1635, and a man of much importance in the infant colony. His American ancestors were fighting stock. His great-grandfather, Noah Grant, held a military commission in the French and Indian War, and his grandfather, also named Noah, fought in the Revolution. Henry Ward Beecher summed up the causes of Grant's meteoric rise from store clerk in 1861, to president in 1869, as follows: Grant was available and lucky. his dominant trait was determination. comprehended the significance of his foe's weakness in the same respects. Grant had learned that if he did not run away his antagonists were likely to do so, and he had ascertained the potency of the formulas with which his name was associated: no terms except unconditional and immediate surrender, and I prop
Seth Williams (search for this): chapter 2
led to make a copy of the terms of surrender in ink. Colonel E. S. Parker, the full-blooded Indian on Grant's staff, an excellent penman, wrote out the final copy. Nineteen years later, General Horace Porter recorded with pride that he loaned General Lee a pencil to make a correction in the terms. Colonels William Duff and J. D. Webster, and General M. R. Patrick, are the three men who were not present at the interview. All of the remaining-officers were formally presented to Lee. General Seth Williams had been Lee's adjutant when the latter was superintendent at West Point some years before the war. In the lower photograph General Grant stands between General Rawlins and Colonel Bowers. The veins standing out on the back of his hand are plainly visible. No one but he could have told how calmly the blood coursed through them during the four tremendous years. Men about to witness Appomattox Grant between Rawlins and Bowers During his stormy period of civil administrati
T. S. Bowers (search for this): chapter 2
aining-officers were formally presented to Lee. General Seth Williams had been Lee's adjutant when the latter was superintendent at West Point some years before the war. In the lower photograph General Grant stands between General Rawlins and Colonel Bowers. The veins standing out on the back of his hand are plainly visible. No one but he could have told how calmly the blood coursed through them during the four tremendous years. Men about to witness Appomattox Grant between Rawlins and Bowers During his stormy period of civil administration, Grant was like a landsman tossing upon an angry sea who makes his port by virtue of the natural drift of the winds and tides rather than through his skill in navigation. The policies President Grant advocated during his two terms of office were sound, and if he did not show the politician's skill in availing himself of the varying winds of popular sentiment, he did exhibit a statesmanlike comprehension of the measures promotive of th
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 2
for their improvement. When he met the battalions of Lee, then trained and seasoned by three years of war, the men which he has been hurling for many weeks against Lee. of publicity, as Grant was by mention in General orpirit, rarely paralleled in history, the surrender of Lee. Here he appears in Philadelphia on his first trip Nont advanced from the North, and crushed the armies of Lee and Johnston. the surrender of the Southern armiesohnson following so immediately upon the surrender of Lee threw the whole question of the readjustment of politwelve men standing above stood also at the signing of Lee's surrender, a few days later. The scene is City Poi Horace Porter recorded with pride that he loaned General Lee a pencil to make a correction in the terms. Colo of the remaining-officers were formally presented to Lee. General Seth Williams had been Lee's adjutant when tLee's adjutant when the latter was superintendent at West Point some years before the war. In the lower photograph General Grant sta
John Charles Fremont (search for this): chapter 2
great military qualities he possessed. Firmness seemed to me about the only characteristic expressed in his features. Otherwise, he was a very plain, unpretentious, unimposing person, easily approached, reticent as a rule, and yet showing at times a fondness for a chat about all sorts of things. This ordinary exterior, however, made it as difficult for me, as in the case of Abraham Lincoln, to persuade myself that he was destined to be one of the greatest arbiters of human fortunes. yet Fremont, who saw him at this time, discovered in him the soldierly qualities of self-poise, modesty, decision, attention to detail. Grant had never been brought into contact with men of public reputation and had no influential friends to push his fortunes when the Civil War opened to him an opportunity. His skill as a drill-master was discovered by accident, and this secured an opportunity for him to go to the Illinois capital with the Galena company he had been drilling. He attracted the atte
Henry Yates (search for this): chapter 2
m at this time, discovered in him the soldierly qualities of self-poise, modesty, decision, attention to detail. Grant had never been brought into contact with men of public reputation and had no influential friends to push his fortunes when the Civil War opened to him an opportunity. His skill as a drill-master was discovered by accident, and this secured an opportunity for him to go to the Illinois capital with the Galena company he had been drilling. He attracted the attention of Governor Yates and was given a clerical position in the adjutant-general's office in filling out army forms. When his appointment as colonel to an unruly volunteer regiment followed, he at once gave proof of the education he had acquired at West Point and his experience of fifteen years service in the regular army. in executing his first orders to take the field, he astonished his superiors by marching his regiment across country instead of moving it comfortably by rail. And when the laggards of t
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