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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 2
he breeze on the crest of Lookout Mountain. Eager hands pointed, and a great cheer went up from the Army of the Cumberland. They knew that the Union troops with Hooker had carried the day in their battle above the clouds. That was the 25th of November, 1863; and that same afternoon the soldiers of Thomas swarmed over the crestrk B. Lagow. The figure in the right foreground is Colonel William S. Hillyer. Seated by the path is an orderly. They have evidently come to survey the site of Hooker's battle from above. Colonel Lagow is carrying a pair of field glasses. Less than four months later Grant was commissioned lieutenant-general and placed in genet distinguished in our Civil War; a relatively higher place than Jefferson Davis, James Longstreet, William J. Hardee, and others of the South; and than Sheridan, Hooker, Buell, and other leaders of the Northern armies. no soldier of like rank was more distinguished in the War with Mexico than Grant, then a lieutenant. It is n
William Joseph Hardee (search for this): chapter 2
he did not possess what is usually regarded as the temperament of the soldier, there was no lack of the training or experience of the soldier. If not a brilliant student, according to the standards of West Point, he made a faithful use of the opportunity which that institution gave him for a military training. In his class-standing he held a middle place with others of the graduates most distinguished in our Civil War; a relatively higher place than Jefferson Davis, James Longstreet, William J. Hardee, and others of the South; and than Sheridan, Hooker, Buell, and other leaders of the Northern armies. no soldier of like rank was more distinguished in the War with Mexico than Grant, then a lieutenant. It is no small achievement for a subaltern to be brought into the lime-light Grant in June, 1864—a summer day at City Point while great events were hanging in the ballance Third from the left sits General Grant at his headquarters at City Point, on a high bluff at the junction
Frederick Grant (search for this): chapter 2
eneral in the United States Army. In front of Grant stands Colonel M. B. Ryan, and on the extreme . supplies at Holly Springs and compelled General Grant to subsist his Army of thirty thousand meny Forrest's enterprising Confederate cavalry. Grant was preparing to move against Vicksburg at thehose obtained from the country as he advanced, Grant carrying no personal baggage himself but a tooederacy and closed it in from the South, while Grant advanced from the North, and crushed the armieer. The scene is City Point, in March, 1865. Grant is surrounded by a group of the officers who hlonel T. S. Bowers (Third from left) upon whom Grant called to make a copy of the terms of surrendelonel E. S. Parker, the full-blooded Indian on Grant's staff, an excellent penman, wrote out the fi years. Men about to witness Appomattox Grant between Rawlins and Bowers During his stormy period of civil administration, Grant was like a landsman tossing upon an angry sea who makes h[5 more...]
Ulysses Simpson Grant (search for this): chapter 2
Chapter 1: Ulysses Simpson Grant William Conant Church Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, United States ike in personal characteristics as was Ulysses Simpson Grant, and so singularly free from the ambitn's entire army of 30,000 men, was obtained by Grant with a casualty list of only 9362, including aulders and lowering brow in this photograph of Grant, taken in December, 1862, tell the story of thmbition and self-glorification. This explains Grant, as it explains Lincoln and Washington. Samuse of the U. S., Uncle Sam, in his name; Sam Grant, as one of those same colleagues once said, waness and intrigue. It was characteristic of Grant's mental processes that he always thought on sion until the necessity for decision arose. Grant recognized earlier than others the fact that, for the high-spirited and independent Grant in 1863. on this page are three photographss are stern, and the expressions intense. Grant in 1863—showing Grant in repose Portrait of [18 more...]
W. T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 2
f his career, the year when he took Vicksburg in July, then in November gazed in wonder at his own soldiers as they swarmed up the heights of Missionary Ridge. The following March he was made General-in-chief of the armies of the United States. Congress passed a vote of thanks to General Grant and his army, and ordered a gold medal to be struck in his honor. But as we see him here, none of these honors had come to him; and the deeds themselves were only in process of accomplishment. Even Sherman, the staunch friend and supporter of Grant, had doubts which were only dispelled by the master stroke at Vicksburg, as to the outcome of Grant's extraordinary methods and plans. He was himself conscious of the heavy responsibility resting upon him and of the fact that he stood on trial before the country. Other faithful generals had been condemned at the bar of public opinion before their projects matured. The eyes in these portraits are stern, and the expressions intense. Grant in
Hannah Simpson (search for this): chapter 2
ed through his policy of vigorous and persistent attack, bringing a contest which had then extended over three years of inconclusive fighting to a final conclusion in one year. General Grant was born, April 27, 1822, in a little one-story cottage on the banks of the Ohio River, at Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio. His grandfather, captain Noah Grant, was a Connecticut soldier of the army of the Revolution who, in 1800, settled on the Connecticut Reservation of Ohio. His mother, Hannah Simpson, was of a sterling American family of pioneers, noted for integrity, truthfulness, and sturdy independence of character. She was a noble woman of strong character, and it was from her that the son inherited his remarkable capacity for reticence, tempered in him by an occasional relapse into the garrulity of his father. If he was incapable of indirection in thought or speech, he could be silent when speech might betray what he did not wish to have known. among his friends, when occas
Noah Grant (search for this): chapter 2
ure in his fame as the conqueror of Vicksburg, Grant still has the greater part of his destiny to ftance, there was no lack of self-confidence in Grant. He had a just estimate of his own abilities e front. Always unassuming in appearance, General Grant had changed in this photograph to his summ for many weeks against Lee. of publicity, as Grant was by mention in General orders commending hig both intelligence and daring. meeting General Grant not long after his return to military lifepplies, as well as in organization, but who Grant in 1865—the zenith of his career behind GraGrant in 1865 lay all his victories on the field of battle; before him the highest gift within the pown. Henry Ward Beecher summed up the causes of Grant's meteoric rise from store clerk in 1861, to pe hands of the chief executive. After Shiloh, Grant fully realized that the country had entered upDecember 20, 1862, surrendered his depot of Grant in characteristic pose, with his staff in 1864[23 more...]
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 2
and experiences had fitted him. If he did not possess what is usually regarded as the temperament of the soldier, there was no lack of the training or experience of the soldier. If not a brilliant student, according to the standards of West Point, he made a faithful use of the opportunity which that institution gave him for a military training. In his class-standing he held a middle place with others of the graduates most distinguished in our Civil War; a relatively higher place than Jefferson Davis, James Longstreet, William J. Hardee, and others of the South; and than Sheridan, Hooker, Buell, and other leaders of the Northern armies. no soldier of like rank was more distinguished in the War with Mexico than Grant, then a lieutenant. It is no small achievement for a subaltern to be brought into the lime-light Grant in June, 1864—a summer day at City Point while great events were hanging in the ballance Third from the left sits General Grant at his headquarters at City Po
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 2
Indeed, no more gentle-hearted and kindly man is known to American history, not excepting Abraham Lincoln. Numerous circumstances in the life of Grant illustrate his consideration for others. Aof things. This ordinary exterior, however, made it as difficult for me, as in the case of Abraham Lincoln, to persuade myself that he was destined to be one of the greatest arbiters of human fortunfoe. there was one who was superior to this professional distrust of Grant, and that was Abraham Lincoln. He had found a man who could accomplish, and the fortune of that man was thenceforth secu activities, to be succeeded by the contests in the forum of political discussion; the death of Lincoln and the succession of Johnson following so immediately upon the surrender of Lee threw the wholral distrust of politicians and political methods, and Grant had never learned the art of which Lincoln was the supreme master—that of utilizing the selfish ambitions of men to accomplish great patri
Matthew Grant (search for this): chapter 2
and supplies, as well as in organization, but who Grant in 1865—the zenith of his career behind Grant in 1865 lay all his victories on the field of battle; before him the highest gift within the power of the American people— the presidency. He says in his memoirs that after Vicksburg he had a presentment that he was to bring the War to a successful end and become the head of the nation. Grant's sturdy, persistent Scottish ancestry stood him in good stead. He was a descendant of Matthew Grant, one of the settlers of Windsor, Connecticut, in 1635, and a man of much importance in the infant colony. His American ancestors were fighting stock. His great-grandfather, Noah Grant, held a military commission in the French and Indian War, and his grandfather, also named Noah, fought in the Revolution. Henry Ward Beecher summed up the causes of Grant's meteoric rise from store clerk in 1861, to president in 1869, as follows: Grant was available and lucky. his dominant trait was det
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