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Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Chapter 1: Ulysses Simpson Grant William Conant Church Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, United States Volunteers During the Wilderness campaign, 1864, when Grant lost an army but saved a nation. Grant on Lookout Mountain—1863 at the spot where hooker signaled victory the week before Wearing epaulets and a sword—quite unusual for him—but calm and imperturbable as of old, with his crumpled army hat, plain blouse, his trousers tucked into his boot-tops, and the inevitable cigar, Ulysseswhen the Union soldiers under Thomas, still smarting from their experience at Chickamauga, stood gazing at the Confederate works behind which rose the crest of Missionary Ridge, the Stars and Stripes were thrown to the breeze on the crest of Lookout Mountain. Eager hands pointed, and a great cheer went up from the Army of the Cumberland. They knew that the Union troops with Hooker had carried the day in their battle above the clouds. That was the 25th of November, 1863; and that same afternoo<
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
pril 9, 1865, was characterized by almost feminine tenderness and tact, and a sympathetic courtesy toward the conquered so marked that an observer was moved to ask, Who's surrendering here, anyway? A simple-hearted country lad disposed to bucolic life, so Grant in 1863—before the first of his great victories Grant was described in 1861 as a man who knows how to do things. In February, 1862, he captured Forts Henry and Donelson, thus opening the way for a Federal advance up the Tennessee River, and was promptly commissioned major-general. His experience at Shiloh in April, coupled with failures in official routine during the Donelson campaign which were not approved by his superiors, left him under a cloud which was not removed until the capture of Vicksburg, July 4, 1863, revealed capacity of a high order. The government's plan of conducting the war was then entrusted to him to work out with practically unlimited power. unbelligerent that he never had even a spat at West
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ing the way for a Federal advance up the Tennessee River, and was promptly commissioned major-general. His experience at Shiloh in April, coupled with failures in official routine during the Donelson campaign which were not approved by his superiors. He was limited by the imperfections of the instruments he had at hand and was subjected to criticism accordingly, as at Shiloh, April 6, 1862, where his failure to protect his Camp is explained by a fear lest a display of apprehension might demoralesponsive to the skilled handling of the educated and trained soldier. previous to the battle of Pittsburg Landing, as Shiloh is also called, Grant had given proof of his energy and his promptness in taking the initiative in the occupation of Padu man who could accomplish, and the fortune of that man was thenceforth secure in the hands of the chief executive. After Shiloh, Grant fully realized that the country had entered upon a long and desperate struggle, and he shaped his course according
West Point (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
government's plan of conducting the war was then entrusted to him to work out with practically unlimited power. unbelligerent that he never had even a spat at West Point, displaying no martial qualities except, perhaps, in his love of horses and in their fearless handling, there was in him no suggestion of the vocation of the soed as the temperament of the soldier, there was no lack of the training or experience of the soldier. If not a brilliant student, according to the standards of West Point, he made a faithful use of the opportunity which that institution gave him for a military training. In his class-standing he held a middle place with others of in filling out army forms. When his appointment as colonel to an unruly volunteer regiment followed, he at once gave proof of the education he had acquired at West Point and his experience of fifteen years service in the regular army. in executing his first orders to take the field, he astonished his superiors by marching his
Holly Springs (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
uared shoulders and lowering brow in this photograph of Grant, taken in December, 1862, tell the story of the intensity of his purpose while he was advancing upon Vicksburg—only to be foiled by Van Dorn's raid on his line of communications at Holly Springs. His grim expression and determined jaw betokened no respite for the Confederates, however. Six months later he marched into the coveted stronghold. This photograph was taken by James Mullen at Oxford, Mississippi, in December, 1862, just of Grant stands Colonel M. B. Ryan, and on the extreme right sits Colonel Ely S. Parker, military secretary, who was a full-blooded Indian, a grandnephew of the famous Red Jacket, and chief of the tribes known as the six Nations. supplies at Holly Springs and compelled General Grant to subsist his Army of thirty thousand men upon the country for two weeks, his communications with his rear being severed at the same time by Forrest's enterprising Confederate cavalry. Grant was preparing to move
Windsor, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
, but who Grant in 1865—the zenith of his career behind Grant in 1865 lay all his victories on the field of battle; before him the highest gift within the power of the American people— the presidency. He says in his memoirs that after Vicksburg he had a presentment that he was to bring the War to a successful end and become the head of the nation. Grant's sturdy, persistent Scottish ancestry stood him in good stead. He was a descendant of Matthew Grant, one of the settlers of Windsor, Connecticut, in 1635, and a man of much importance in the infant colony. His American ancestors were fighting stock. His great-grandfather, Noah Grant, held a military commission in the French and Indian War, and his grandfather, also named Noah, fought in the Revolution. Henry Ward Beecher summed up the causes of Grant's meteoric rise from store clerk in 1861, to president in 1869, as follows: Grant was available and lucky. his dominant trait was determination. comprehended the significance
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
the left sits General Grant at his headquarters at City Point, on a high bluff at the junction of the James and the Appomattox rivers. At this moment his reputation hangs in the balance. In the three successive battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylva supreme master—that of utilizing the selfish ambitions of men to accomplish great patriotic and public purposes. Appomattox. no photographer was present at Appomattox, that supreme moment in our national history, when Americans met for the Appomattox, that supreme moment in our national history, when Americans met for the last time as foes on the field. Nothing but fanciful sketches exist of the scene inside the McLean home. But here is a photograph that shows most of the Union officers present at the conference. Nine of the twelve men standing above stood also at e could have told how calmly the blood coursed through them during the four tremendous years. Men about to witness Appomattox Grant between Rawlins and Bowers During his stormy period of civil administration, Grant was like a landsman tos
Oxford (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Vicksburg The close-set mouth, squared shoulders and lowering brow in this photograph of Grant, taken in December, 1862, tell the story of the intensity of his purpose while he was advancing upon Vicksburg—only to be foiled by Van Dorn's raid on his line of communications at Holly Springs. His grim expression and determined jaw betokened no respite for the Confederates, however. Six months later he marched into the coveted stronghold. This photograph was taken by James Mullen at Oxford, Mississippi, in December, 1862, just before Van Dorn's raid balked the general's plans. After Vicksburg This photograph was taken in the fall of 1863, after the capture of the Confederacy's Gibraltar had raised Grant to secure and everlasting fame. His attitude is relaxed and his eyebrows no longer mark a straight line across the grim visage. The right brow is slightly arched with an almost jovial expression. But the jaw is no less vigorous and determined, and the steadfast eyes seem to b
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
this youthful romance ended in the disillusion which often attends such experiences. And it was this man, whose personal characteristics were all so unlike those distinguishing the remorseless conqueror, slaughtering men for glory's sake, who was selected from among the heroes of our great domestic strife for the appellation of butcher. No one of them less deserved this title, for none of them accomplished as great results with a less proportionate loss of life. The repulse of Lee at Gettysburg, in 1863, was obtained at a cost of 23,000 casualties—3155 killed, 14,529 wounded, 5365 missing—and at the end Lee marched with his army from the field of battle. The more complete victory at Vicksburg, with the surrender of Pemberton's entire army of 30,000 men, was obtained by Grant with a casualty list of only 9362, including about 450 missing. Heavy as were the losses during the year which preceded the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, they were less than the aggregate lo
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ge beyond the condition of an armed mob, only partially responsive to the skilled handling of the educated and trained soldier. previous to the battle of Pittsburg Landing, as Shiloh is also called, Grant had given proof of his energy and his promptness in taking the initiative in the occupation of Paducah, Kentucky, September 6, 1861; in the comparatively trifling affair at Belmont, Missouri, November 7, 1861; and in his important success in the capture of Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River, Tennessee, in February, 1862, where he had the efficient assistance of the gunboats, under Flag-officer Foote. These successes increased his confidence in himself, as back came the echo of exultant popular approval when the country saw how capable this man was of accomplishing great results with troops lacking in arms, equipment, transportation, and supplies, as well as in organization, but who Grant in 1865—the zenith of his career behind Grant in 1865 lay all his victories on the f
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