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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 5
suddenly famous of American generals. The year after his graduation he attracted attention by his performances as lieutenant of artillery under General Scott in Mexico, and was brevetted captain and major for bravery at Contreras, Churubusco, and Chapultepec. Fourteen years later he earned his sobriquet of Stonewall in the firs, considered this the best likeness. United States Military Academy, and was known to have been a some-time officer of the army, serving in Magruder's battery in Mexico during the campaign of Scott from Vera Cruz to the capital city. it was even intimated that he had won certain brevets there for service at Vera Cruz, Contrerars in which most of his leisure had been devoted to the study of the campaigns of the great strategists of history, from Caesar to Napoleon, and his discipline in Mexico had given him some useful suggestions for their application to modern conditions. Also it had afforded the opportunity for giving that invaluable asset, the abil
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
atter if our feet are torn, quick step—we're with him ere the dawn. that was Stonewall Jackson's way. a purposeful man, obstacles were to him but things to be overcome or ignored if they stood in the way of his plans. When one of his Confederate generals with Jackson in his masterly 1863 campaign A. H. Colquitt, later conspicuous in the defense of Petersburg. R. L. Walker, commander of a light artillery brigade. Alfred Iverson, later at Gettysburg and with Hood at Atlanta. S. McGowan, later commanded the South Carolina brigade which Immortalized his name. E. A. O'Neal charged with his brigade in Rodes' First line at Chancellorsville. subordinates, after the three days hard fighting of the Second Manassas, preceded by a march of almost a hundred miles within a little more than a like period of time, objected that his men could not march further until they should have received rations, he was promptly put under arrest by Jackson, bent as he was upon fol
Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Edward Johnson led an independent command under Jackson in 1862. George H. Steuart, later a brigade commander in Lee's Army. James A. Walker led a brigade under Jackson at Antietam. E. M. law, conspicuous at South Mountain and Maryland Heights. Charles W. field, later in command of one of Longstreet's divisions. this exposed condition was due to his own activity in the Valley, which had held McDowell inert upon the Rappahannock with thirty-five thousand muskets which should has who cooperated with Jackson in 1862 and 1863 Lafayette McLaws with his division supported Jackson's attacks at Harper's Ferry and Chancellorsville; later conspicuous at Gettysburg and Chickamauga. Joseph Brevard Kershaw captured Maryland Heights, opposite Jackson's position at Harper's Ferry. James L. Kemper commanded a brigade on Jackson's Right at the Second battle of Manassas. Ambrose R. Wright with his brigade closed the pass along the Canal at Harper's Ferry. the pines we
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
to any inherent fitness residing in him. True, he was said to have graduated from the Jackson—his most revealing photograph: a picture secured only by the urging of General Bradley T. Johnson. Jackson, a modest hero, nearly always shrank from being photographed. At the height of his fame he answered a publisher's letter with a refusal to write the desired magazine article or to send any picture of himself, though the offer was a very flattering one. The photograph above was made in Winchester, in February, 1862, at the Rontzohn gallery, where Jackson had been persuaded to spend a few minutes by the earnest entreaties of General Bradley T. Johnson. Some five months later Jackson was to send Banks whirling down the Shenandoah Valley, to the friendly shelter of the Potomac and Harper's Ferry, keep three armies busy in pursuit of him, and finally turn upon them and defeat two of them. This, with the profile portrait taken near Fredericksburg, shown on page 115 of Volume II, repre
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Howard's Corps, May 2, 1863. Harry T. Hays, later charged the batteries at Gettysburg. Robert F. Hoke, later defender of Petersburg, Richmond and Wilmington. William Smith, Colonel of the 49th Virginia; later at Gettysburg. J. R. Jones commanded a brigade of Virginians in Trimble's division. F. L. Thomas commanded a . Walker, commander of a light artillery brigade. Alfred Iverson, later at Gettysburg and with Hood at Atlanta. S. McGowan, later commanded the South Carolina backson's attacks at Harper's Ferry and Chancellorsville; later conspicuous at Gettysburg and Chickamauga. Joseph Brevard Kershaw captured Maryland Heights, oppositeusly all the while. After the Confederate success at Chancellorsville came Gettysburg. The question is often asked what would have happened had Jackson been presembers—as at Sharpsburg (Antietam) and Chancellorsville, for instance. But at Gettysburg, we were short just one man—who had been dead just two months-and his name wa
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Chapter 4: Stonewall Jackson—a memory Allen C. Redwood Fifty-fifth Virginia Regiment, Confederate States Army Thomas J. Jackson in the forties a portrait taken during the Mexican War, where Jackson served as a second lieutenant, the year after his graduation from West Point when the early details of the first important collision between the contending forces in Virginia, in 1861, began to come in, some prominence was given to the item relating how a certain brigade of Virginia troopdemanding more! of this mass of fiction—of unthreshed grain—there remains yet one kernel of veracious history, and the incident was predestined to exercise significant and far-reaching influence Thomas Jonathan Jackson as first lieutenant, U. S. A. Jackson's very soul impressed itself on the glass of this early negative through his striking features—more clearly read than later, when a heavy beard had covered the resolute lips, and the habit of command had veiled the deep-seeing, somber e
William Smith (search for this): chapter 5
but within the interval we were to see much of him, and our appreciation speedily penetrated below the surface indica- Confederate generals with Jackson at the last— Chancellorsville B. D. Fry, Colonel of the 13th Alabama; later led a brigade in Pickett's charge. F. T. Nichols, wounded in the flank attack on Howard's Corps, May 2, 1863. Harry T. Hays, later charged the batteries at Gettysburg. Robert F. Hoke, later defender of Petersburg, Richmond and Wilmington. William Smith, Colonel of the 49th Virginia; later at Gettysburg. J. R. Jones commanded a brigade of Virginians in Trimble's division. F. L. Thomas commanded a brigade in A. P. Hill's division. tions as we came to know and trust the man who conducted us to unfailing victory. Soldiers always forgive the means so that the end may be assured, and no man ever worked his troops harder than did Jackson, or ever awakened in them more intense enthusiasm and devotion. His appearance never failed to c
Ambrose R. Wright (search for this): chapter 5
the Plank Road, in a small opening among Confederate generals of Longstreet's corps who cooperated with Jackson in 1862 and 1863 Lafayette McLaws with his division supported Jackson's attacks at Harper's Ferry and Chancellorsville; later conspicuous at Gettysburg and Chickamauga. Joseph Brevard Kershaw captured Maryland Heights, opposite Jackson's position at Harper's Ferry. James L. Kemper commanded a brigade on Jackson's Right at the Second battle of Manassas. Ambrose R. Wright with his brigade closed the pass along the Canal at Harper's Ferry. the pines were two mounted figures whom we recognized as Lee and Jackson. The former was seemingly giving some final instructions, emphasizing with the forefinger of his gantleted right hand in the palm of the left what he was saying—inaudible to us. The other, wearing a long rubber coat over his uniform (it had been raining a little, late in the night), was nodding vivaciously all the while. After the Confederate
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 5
onstration at top speed. Rigid disciplinarian that he was in all essentials, there was not the suspicion of concern with pomp and circumstance in all his make-up. War was to him much too serious an affair to be complicated by anything of the sort, nor was he at all tolerant of excuses when there was work in hand—results alone counted. at Chantilly, our division commander sent word to him that he was not sure that he could hold his position as his ammunition was wet. my compliments to General Hill and say that the enemy's ammunition is as wet as his, and to hold his ground, was Jackson's reply. Yet, unsparing as he was of his men when the urgency of the occasion demanded it, he was equally unsparing of himself, and, moreover, was always concerned for their well-being once the emergency was past, realizing that all warlike preparation is to the end of lavish expenditure at the supreme moment. In Camp he was always solicitous that the troops should be well cared for, but when it ca
his credentials and antecedents. The young cadets from the Virginia Military Institute, who promptly flocked to the colors of the State and of the Confederacy, could give but little satisfactory information; to their boyish minds he was just old Jack, instructor in natural philosophy and artillery tactics, something of a martinet and stickler for observance of regulation, and, on the whole, rather queer and not at all approachable. That he should be in command of a brigade seemed to them due akened in them more intense enthusiasm and devotion. His appearance never failed to call forth that tumultuous cheer which was part of the battle onset. This was mostly, it must be admitted, in a spirit of mischief and for the sake of making old Jack run, for he never liked an ovation and always spurred out of the demonstration at top speed. Rigid disciplinarian that he was in all essentials, there was not the suspicion of concern with pomp and circumstance in all his make-up. War was to him
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