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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Stonewall (search for this): chapter 5
and Chapultepec. Fourteen years later he earned his sobriquet of Stonewall in the first great battle of the Civil War. Within two years more At last, one boy—the dullard of the class, usually—suggested, Stonewall and the men who bore his orders their honors came not easily te dawn of his brilliant career John Echols, Colonel of a Stonewall regiment at Bull Run; later led a brigade in Lee's Army. J. D. ughout 1862; last, at Fredericksburg. Isaac R. Trimble. where Stonewall was, there was Trimble also. Arnold Elzey, a brigade and divisirred upon Manassas field had become the veriest of misnomers; the Stonewall had acquired a marvelous mobility since that July day not yet a ythe writer heard that he was no other than our commander, General Stonewall Jackson. he wore a rather faded gray coat and cap to match—theorsville, for instance. But at Gettysburg, we were short just one man—who had been dead just two months-and his name was Stonewall J
R. L. Walker (search for this): chapter 5
should be well cared for, but when it came to take the field, what matter if our shoes are worn, what matter if our feet are torn, quick step—we're with him ere the dawn. that was Stonewall Jackson's way. a purposeful man, obstacles were to him but things to be overcome or ignored if they stood in the way of his plans. When one of his Confederate generals with Jackson in his masterly 1863 campaign A. H. Colquitt, later conspicuous in the defense of Petersburg. R. L. Walker, commander of a light artillery brigade. Alfred Iverson, later at Gettysburg and with Hood at Atlanta. S. McGowan, later commanded the South Carolina brigade which Immortalized his name. E. A. O'Neal charged with his brigade in Rodes' First line at Chancellorsville. subordinates, after the three days hard fighting of the Second Manassas, preceded by a march of almost a hundred miles within a little more than a like period of time, objected that his men could not march further un
Nathaniel Prentiss Banks (search for this): chapter 5
The photograph above was made in Winchester, in February, 1862, at the Rontzohn gallery, where Jackson had been persuaded to spend a few minutes by the earnest entreaties of General Bradley T. Johnson. Some five months later Jackson was to send Banks whirling down the Shenandoah Valley, to the friendly shelter of the Potomac and Harper's Ferry, keep three armies busy in pursuit of him, and finally turn upon them and defeat two of them. This, with the profile portrait taken near Fredericksburhe capture of the rich spoil of War, the supplies, of which we were already beginning to feel the need. Our daily diet of unrelieved bread and bacon grew fairly nauseating at the thought of the bounty so generously provided by Commissary-General Banks, and of the extra dainties inviting pillage in the tents of Israel—but we were to get our share, with accrued interest, later on. we had not yet ceased to marvel over these exploits when Jackson executed one of his mysterious disappearances, p
George Edward Pickett (search for this): chapter 5
When we took Harper's Ferry, in September of that same year, one of the surrendered garrison remarked, when Jackson was pointed out to him, well, he's not much to look at, but if we'd only had him, we'd never have been in this fix. but within the interval we were to see much of him, and our appreciation speedily penetrated below the surface indica- Confederate generals with Jackson at the last— Chancellorsville B. D. Fry, Colonel of the 13th Alabama; later led a brigade in Pickett's charge. F. T. Nichols, wounded in the flank attack on Howard's Corps, May 2, 1863. Harry T. Hays, later charged the batteries at Gettysburg. Robert F. Hoke, later defender of Petersburg, Richmond and Wilmington. William Smith, Colonel of the 49th Virginia; later at Gettysburg. J. R. Jones commanded a brigade of Virginians in Trimble's division. F. L. Thomas commanded a brigade in A. P. Hill's division. tions as we came to know and trust the man who conducted us to unfaili
Allen C. Redwood (search for this): chapter 5
Chapter 4: Stonewall Jackson—a memory Allen C. Redwood Fifty-fifth Virginia Regiment, Confederate States Army Thomas J. Jackson in the forties a portrait taken during the Mexican War, where Jackson served as a second lieutenant, the year after his graduation from West Point when the early details of the first important collision between the contending forces in Virginia, in 1861, began to come in, some prominence was given to the item relating how a certain brigade of Virginia troops, recruited mostly from the Shenandoah valley and the region adjacent to the Blue Ridge, had contributed, largely by their steadiness under fire, almost for the first time, to the sustaining of the hard-pressed and wavering Confederate left flank, and the subsequent conversion of what had threatened to be a disastrous defeat to the Southern arms into a disorderly and utter rout of the opposing army. War was a very new experience to most of that generation, and the capacity for absorbing sen
Irvin McDowell (search for this): chapter 5
ng in McClellan's exposed right. Confederate generals with Jackson in 1862 Edward Johnson led an independent command under Jackson in 1862. George H. Steuart, later a brigade commander in Lee's Army. James A. Walker led a brigade under Jackson at Antietam. E. M. law, conspicuous at South Mountain and Maryland Heights. Charles W. field, later in command of one of Longstreet's divisions. this exposed condition was due to his own activity in the Valley, which had held McDowell inert upon the Rappahannock with thirty-five thousand muskets which should have been with the force north of the Chickahominy, inviting attack. Jackson rarely declined such invitations; he could scent an exposed flank with the nose of a hound and was fast dog following the trail when struck. Besides his habitual celerity of movement, was his promptness in delivering attack, which was an element of his success. the first musket upon the ground was fired, says a distinguished English aut
h was an element of his success. the first musket upon the ground was fired, says a distinguished English authority, without giving the opposing force time to realize that the fight was on and to make its dispositions to meet the attack or even to ascertain in what force it was being made. the quiet, retiring pedagogue of the V. M. I. had not been wasting those ten years in which most of his leisure had been devoted to the study of the campaigns of the great strategists of history, from Caesar to Napoleon, and his discipline in Mexico had given him some useful suggestions for their application to modern conditions. Also it had afforded the opportunity for giving that invaluable asset, the ability to gage the caliber of the men cooperating with him or opposed to him, with most of whom he had come in contact personally—a peculiarity of our Civil War, and one of important bearing upon all the operations conducted by officers of the regular establishment who, almost without exception
George Brinton McClellan (search for this): chapter 5
the Confederate line were being severally driven in. Johnston had retired from Manassas to the line of the Rappahannock, presently to proceed to Yorktown, and eventually to retire thence to the Chickahominy. It was while lying there, awaiting McClellan's attack, that we began to get news of very active proceedings in the Valley region, which came to have important bearing upon our fortunes, and in the final issue to determine the contest we were expecting and awaiting in our immediate front. accrued interest, later on. we had not yet ceased to marvel over these exploits when Jackson executed one of his mysterious disappearances, puzzling alike to friend and foe, and he next announced himself by the salvo of his guns, driving in McClellan's exposed right. Confederate generals with Jackson in 1862 Edward Johnson led an independent command under Jackson in 1862. George H. Steuart, later a brigade commander in Lee's Army. James A. Walker led a brigade under Jacks
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (search for this): chapter 5
re he led. upon the struggle, then in its very inception. In that fiery baptism, a man still unknown to fame was to receive, at the hands of a gallant soldier about to surrender his soul to the Maker who gave it, the name which, to the world, was to supplant that conferred by his natural sponsors, and by which he will ever be known as among the great captains of his race and of history. The supreme effort of the Federal commander was directed against the left of the army of Johnston and Beauregard and upon the open plateau surrounding the Henry house. The battle was raging furiously, and seemingly the Southern line at that Point was on the verge of utter disaster, when the Carolinian, General Barnard E. Bee, rode from his shattered and wavering brigade over to where Jackson still held fast with his mountain men. General, he said in tones of anguish, they are beating us back. no, sir, was the grim reply; we will give them the bayonet. Bee rode back and spoke to his brigade: l
Frank P. Clark (search for this): chapter 5
ad been persuaded to spend a few minutes by the earnest entreaties of General Bradley T. Johnson. Some five months later Jackson was to send Banks whirling down the Shenandoah Valley, to the friendly shelter of the Potomac and Harper's Ferry, keep three armies busy in pursuit of him, and finally turn upon them and defeat two of them. This, with the profile portrait taken near Fredericksburg, shown on page 115 of Volume II, represents the only two sittings of Jackson during the War. Captain Frank P. Clark, who served three years in close association with the General, considered this the best likeness. United States Military Academy, and was known to have been a some-time officer of the army, serving in Magruder's battery in Mexico during the campaign of Scott from Vera Cruz to the capital city. it was even intimated that he had won certain brevets there for service at Vera Cruz, Contreras, and Chapultepec, rising from the grade of second lieutenant to that of major within a period
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