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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
lorsville. Jas. T. Archer commanded a brigade at Chancellorsville. approach to the Confederate capital was to be attempted from that direction. Already he had proceeded thither with his two divisions which had made the Valley Campaign—his own and Ewell's—when ours, commanded by A. P. Hill, received orders to join them, and all three were thenceforth incorporated in the Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, as long as he commanded it. we had fought the sharp engagement of Cedar Mountain on the 9th of August, 1862, and checked Pope's advance to the Rapidan. Then, after some days of rest, we again took the initiative and, crossing the little river, went after him. But the General who had heretofore seen only the backs of his enemies did not see fit to await our coming, but made so prompt and rapid a retrograde movement that even our expeditious foot cavalry could not come up with him before he passed the Rappahannock. It was on this hurried pursuit, passing through Bran
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
end Banks whirling down the Shenandoah Valley, to the friendly shelter of the Potomac and Harper's Ferry, keep three armies busy in pursuit of him, and finally turn upon them and defeat two of them. This, with the profile portrait taken near Fredericksburg, shown on page 115 of Volume II, represents the only two sittings of Jackson during the War. Captain Frank P. Clark, who served three years in close association with the General, considered this the best likeness. United States Military Acad John Echols, Colonel of a Stonewall regiment at Bull Run; later led a brigade in Lee's Army. J. D. Imboden, at Bull Run and always with Jackson; later commanded a Cavalry brigade. W. B. Taliaferro, with Jackson throughout 1862; last, at Fredericksburg. Isaac R. Trimble. where Stonewall was, there was Trimble also. Arnold Elzey, a brigade and division commander under Jackson and later. all the outlying posts of the Confederate line were being severally driven in. Johnston had retir
Blue Ridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nnock, presently to proceed to Yorktown, and eventually to retire thence to the Chickahominy. It was while lying there, awaiting McClellan's attack, that we began to get news of very active proceedings in the Valley region, which came to have important bearing upon our fortunes, and in the final issue to determine the contest we were expecting and awaiting in our immediate front. to those sultry, squalid camps, reeking with malaria and swarming with flies, came from beyond the far-away Blue Ridge stirring and encouraging tidings of rapid march and sudden swoop; of telling blows where least expected; of skilful maneuvering of a small force, resulting in the frustrating of all combinations of one numerically its superior, and paralyzing for the time being all the plans of the Federal War Department and the grand strategy of the young Napoleon at the head of its armies in the field. it seemed as if the sobriquet conferred upon Manassas field had become the veriest of misnomers; the
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
no confidants as to his military designs—quite the opposite: before starting on his march to Harper's Ferry he called for a map of the Pennsylvania frontier, and made many inquiries as to roads and loer a showy horseman—in which respect he had a precedent in the great Napoleon. When we took Harper's Ferry, in September of that same year, one of the surrendered garrison remarked, when Jackson was in 1862 and 1863 Lafayette McLaws with his division supported Jackson's attacks at Harper's Ferry and Chancellorsville; later conspicuous at Gettysburg and Chickamauga. Joseph Brevard Kershaw captured Maryland Heights, opposite Jackson's position at Harper's Ferry. James L. Kemper commanded a brigade on Jackson's Right at the Second battle of Manassas. Ambrose R. Wright with his brigade closed the pass along the Canal at Harper's Ferry. the pines were two mounted figures whom we recognized as Lee and Jackson. The former was seemingly giving some final instructions, emphasizi
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
retained to the Confederacy, and we were to hear much of his doings from that time until his untimely and tragic death. But in the months immediately succeeding Bull Run, he was almost lost sight of, and it was only at the opening of the campaign of 1862 that he began to loom again upon the military horizon. the fortunes of thng in upon the capital, and Confederate generals with Jackson at the dawn of his brilliant career John Echols, Colonel of a Stonewall regiment at Bull Run; later led a brigade in Lee's Army. J. D. Imboden, at Bull Run and always with Jackson; later commanded a Cavalry brigade. W. B. Taliaferro, with Jackson thrBull Run and always with Jackson; later commanded a Cavalry brigade. W. B. Taliaferro, with Jackson throughout 1862; last, at Fredericksburg. Isaac R. Trimble. where Stonewall was, there was Trimble also. Arnold Elzey, a brigade and division commander under Jackson and later. all the outlying posts of the Confederate line were being severally driven in. Johnston had retired from Manassas to the line of the Rappahannock, pr
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
federate generals with Jackson at Antietam and Chancellorsville A. R. Lawton led Ewell's old division R. E. Colston commanded Trimble's division at Chancellorsville. Henry Heth commanded the light division at Chancellorsville. Jas. T. Archer commanded a brigade at Chancellorsville. approach to the Confederate caChancellorsville. approach to the Confederate capital was to be attempted from that direction. Already he had proceeded thither with his two divisions which Confederate generals with Jackson at the last— Chancellorsville B. D. Fry, Colonel of the 13th Alabamarged with his brigade in Rodes' First line at Chancellorsville. subordinates, after the three days hard figported Jackson's attacks at Harper's Ferry and Chancellorsville; later conspicuous at Gettysburg and Chickamauthe while. After the Confederate success at Chancellorsville came Gettysburg. The question is often asked f mere numbers—as at Sharpsburg (Antietam) and Chancellorsville, for instance. But at Gettysburg, we were sho
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
in this fix. but within the interval we were to see much of him, and our appreciation speedily penetrated below the surface indica- Confederate generals with Jackson at the last— Chancellorsville B. D. Fry, Colonel of the 13th Alabama; later led a brigade in Pickett's charge. F. T. Nichols, wounded in the flank attack on Howard's Corps, May 2, 1863. Harry T. Hays, later charged the batteries at Gettysburg. Robert F. Hoke, later defender of Petersburg, Richmond and Wilmington. William Smith, Colonel of the 49th Virginia; later at Gettysburg. J. R. Jones commanded a brigade of Virginians in Trimble's division. F. L. Thomas commanded a brigade in A. P. Hill's division. tions as we came to know and trust the man who conducted us to unfailing victory. Soldiers always forgive the means so that the end may be assured, and no man ever worked his troops harder than did Jackson, or ever awakened in them more intense enthusiasm and devotion. His appearance ne
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
influence Thomas Jonathan Jackson as first lieutenant, U. S. A. Jackson's very soul impressed itself on the glass of this early negative t and enthusiastic devotion of the soldiers who came to be known as Jackson's foot cavalry, so unparalleled were the marches they made under hand the men who bore his orders their honors came not easily to Jackson's staff officers. Tireless himself, regardless of all personal coe enemy's ammunition is as wet as his, and to hold his ground, was Jackson's reply. Yet, unsparing as he was of his men when the urgency of 862 and 1863 Lafayette McLaws with his division supported Jackson's attacks at Harper's Ferry and Chancellorsville; later conspicuouauga. Joseph Brevard Kershaw captured Maryland Heights, opposite Jackson's position at Harper's Ferry. James L. Kemper commanded a brigade on Jackson's Right at the Second battle of Manassas. Ambrose R. Wright with his brigade closed the pass along the Canal at Harper's Ferr
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e in Lee's Army. J. D. Imboden, at Bull Run and always with Jackson; later commanded a Cavalry brigade. W. B. Taliaferro, with Jackson throughout 1862; last, at Fredericksburg. Isaac R. Trimble. where Stonewall was, there was Trimble also. Arnold Elzey, a brigade and division commander under Jackson and later. all the outlying posts of the Confederate line were being severally driven in. Johnston had retired from Manassas to the line of the Rappahannock, presently to proceed to Yorktown, and eventually to retire thence to the Chickahominy. It was while lying there, awaiting McClellan's attack, that we began to get news of very active proceedings in the Valley region, which came to have important bearing upon our fortunes, and in the final issue to determine the contest we were expecting and awaiting in our immediate front. to those sultry, squalid camps, reeking with malaria and swarming with flies, came from beyond the far-away Blue Ridge stirring and encouraging tidi
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
son—a memory Allen C. Redwood Fifty-fifth Virginia Regiment, Confederate States Army Thomas J. Jackson in the forties a portrait taken during the Mexican War, where Jackson served as a second lieutenant, the year after his graduation from West Point when the early details of the first important collision between the contending forces in Virginia, in 1861, began to come in, some prominence was given to the item relating how a certain brigade of Virginia troops, recruited mostly from they read than later, when a heavy beard had covered the resolute lips, and the habit of command had veiled the deep-seeing, somber eyes. When the quiet Virginia boy with the strong religious bent graduated eighteenth in his class of seventy from West Point in 1846, his comrades little thought that he was destined to become the most suddenly famous of American generals. The year after his graduation he attracted attention by his performances as lieutenant of artillery under General Scott in Mexic
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