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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the Third Missouri Infantry and an artillery battery, and after assisting Captain Lyon in the capture of Camp Jackson, he served in Missouri, at Carthage and at Springfield. As brigadier-general of volunteers, he was conspicuous for his bravery at Pea Ridge, and as major-general of volunteers was placed in command of Harper's Ferrt time in 1864, while it was serving in the Army of the Gulf. He resigned his commission on November 30, 1864, and resumed the practice of law. He died at Springfield, Illinois, September 20, 1900. Major-General Cadwallader Colden Washburn was born in Livermore, Maine, April 22, 1818. He settled in Wisconsin as a lawyer annt of Kentucky. After the war, he was governor of Illinois, United States senator, and candidate of the Gold Democrats for President, in 1896. He died in Springfield, Illinois, September 25, 1900. Brevet major-general Jefferson Columbus Davis was born in Clarke County, Indiana, March 2, 1828, and served as a volunteer in t
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t at the fall of Vicksburg, and also held command in Texas and at Port Hudson. He received the surrender of thn Florida, in the Mexican War, and in California and Texas. At the opening of the Civil War he was promoted toproperty of the United States Government to the State of Texas, and escaped by steamer to New York. His first in Detroit, Michigan, April 16, 1823. He served in Texas, in Florida, and in the Mexican War, resigning his c and served in the Seminole and Mexican wars, and in Texas and New Mexico. He had reached the rank of captain , and became chief engineer of the Union Pacific and Texas Pacific railways. In 1866-67, he was member of Cong born in Tyre, New York, May 28, 1830, and served in Texas and Florida. He was at Fort Pickens from April to Jetersburg, and then formed the army of occupation in Texas. Federal generals—No. 20 Ohio Jamond, in April, 1865. After commanding a district in Texas, he was mustered out of the service, and returned to
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
for gallant service throughout the War. Hasbrouck Davis led his command out of the net at Harper's Ferry. Elias S. Dennis, originally Colonel of the 30th regiment; conspicuous at Mobile. Gilesus for his bravery at Pea Ridge, and as major-general of volunteers was placed in command of Harper's Ferry in June, 1862. Then he served in the Army of Virginia, in command of its First Corps, out ot at New Market, May 15th, he was relieved by Major-General Hunter and given the division at Harper's Ferry, where he successfully held out against Lieutenant-General Early. In July, 1864, he was relh New York in the charge against the Stonewall at Fredericksburg. Max Weber, in command at Harper's Ferry in 1864. Charles G. Halpino (miles O'Reilly), Poet and author; assistant adjutant-generals Indian expeditions in the far West. In 1859, he took part in the capture of John Brown at Harper's Ferry. As brigadier-general of volunteers, he commanded a brigade in Buell's Division and the Fir
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
oops were merged in the Eighteenth Army Corps. It was commanded in turn by Major-General John A. Dix and Brigadier-Generals H. M. Naglee and G. W. Getty. Its principal engagements were the affair at Deserted House, Virginia, and the defense of Suffolk, when besieged by Longstreet in 1863. Its greatest strength, present for duty, was about thirty-three thousand. Major-General John Adams Dix was born in Boscawen, New Hampshire, July 24, 1798. In 1812, he entered the United States army New Haven, Connecticut, December 22, 1803, and served in the Mexican War and in the Engineer Corps. From May, 1861, to March, 1862, he had charge of the Department of Washington, and as brigadier-general of volunteers commanded the District of Suffolk of the Seventh Army Corps, and captured the town of Norfolk in May. As major-general of volunteers, he was put at the head of the newly formed Twelfth Army Corps on September 12, 1862, and was mortally wounded at Antietam, on the 17th. Breve
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
n, R. J. Oglesby, Brigadier-General G. M. Dodge, Colonel A. Mersey, and Brigadier-Generals E. A. Carr and T. E. G. Ransom. The Detachment, which included a division of the Seventeenth Army Corps, was, on February 18, 1865, designated the Sixteenth Corps, with Smith in command. The corps was now in the Military Division of West Mississippi and assisted in the last operations around Mobile. It was discontinued July 20, 1865. Major-General Stephen Augustus Hurlbut was born in Charleston, South Carolina, November 29, 1815, and was admitted to the bar in 1837. In 1845, he removed to Illinois and attained considerable prominence in politics. At the opening of the Civil War he was appointed a brigadier-general of volunteers, and commanded a division at Shiloh. Later, he was at the head of several districts in the department and was given command of the reorganized Sixteenth Corps, Army of the Tennessee, in December, 1862. In September, 1862, he was promoted to major-general of vo
Pea Ridge, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e Army of the Southwest; led troops at Wilson's Creek and Pea Ridge. Quincy Adams Gillmore, commander of the Department anduri and Arkansas, including Bentonville, Sugar Creek, and Pea Ridge. Major-General Samuel Ryan Curtis (U. S. M. A. 183 especial bravery and military ability at Wilson's Creek, Pea Ridge, Black River Bridge, and the capture of Little Rock. He served in the Army of the Southwest, and was captured at Pea Ridge after conduct that brought him great praise and a medal othe 34th regiment. W. P. Benton commanded a brigade at Pea Ridge. F. Knefler, originally Colonel of the 79th regiment. eral of volunteers, he was conspicuous for his bravery at Pea Ridge, and as major-general of volunteers was placed in commandiment, and led a division in the Army of the Southwest at Pea Ridge. As brigadier-general of volunteers, he served as divisiel, he had a brigade in the Army of the Southwest, and at Pea Ridge he commanded a division. Passing into the Army of the Te
Brazil, Clay County, Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
he was made major-general. He was given command of the Middle Department in June, and headed the Eighth Army Corps when it was organized in July. In January, 1863, he went back to the Department of the East, which had been recreated, and remained there until July 18th. He was retired from the army on August 1, 1865, and died in Troy, New York, November 10, 1869. Major-General Robert Cumming Schenck was born in Franklin, Ohio, October 4, 1809. He became a lawyer, and was minister to Brazil, 1851-53. When the Civil War broke out he was made brigadier-general of volunteers, and commanded a brigade at the battle of Bull Run. His force was transferred to the Department of Western Virginia, and he aided in saving that valuable region to the Union. In the new Mountain Department, Schenck had an independent Brigade, and he commanded the Federal right at the battle of Cross Keys. He was given a division of the First Corps, Army of Virginia, when the Mountain troops were merged in
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
was commanded by Major-Generals J. M. Schofield and F. J. Herron, and by Major-General James G. Blunt temporarily. It was very active during its existence, and fought many minor engagements in the Southwest, including Clark's Mill, Missouri, and Prairie Grove, Arkansas, and the capture of Van Buren, Arkansas. The army went out of existence June 5, 1863, and its troops were scattered among the districts in Tennessee and Missouri. Major-General Francis Jay Herron was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1837, and gave up his business career in Iowa to go to the front as lieutenant-colonel of an Iowa regiment. He served in the Army of the Southwest, and was captured at Pea Ridge after conduct that brought him great praise and a medal of honor. He was given a division of the Army of the Frontier, which he commanded at Prairie Grove. From March to June, 1863, he was, as major-general of volunteers, at the head of the army itself. Later, as division commander of the Thirteenth
Cologne (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 7
ivision at Harper's Ferry, where he successfully held out against Lieutenant-General Early. In July, 1864, he was relieved from his command, and he resigned from the army in May, 1865. After the war, he edited a German paper in Baltimore, and later was register and United States pension-agent in New York city. He was well known as a lecturer and editor of the New York Monthly, a German periodical. He died in New York city, August 21, 1902. Major-General Carl Schurz was born in Cologne, Prussia, March 2, 1829, studying there in the gymnasium and later at the University of Bonn. He was engaged in the revolutionary movement in 1848, and was compelled to seek refuge in Switzerland. In 1852, he came to the United States and settled in Philadelphia, later going to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he began the practice of law. Lincoln appointed him United States minister to Spain, but he resigned to take part in the Civil War. As brigadier-general of volunteers, he commanded a division
Elizabethtown (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
cy, the Union territory would have been contracted at General Winfield Scott and Major-General Henry Wager Halleck. The upper photograph, as beautifully composed as a classic painting, shows General and Mrs. Scott at their home, Elizabeth, New Jersey, in 1862. A closer portrait study of the general appears below. Winfield Scott became the first general-in-chief of the United States Army during the Civil War, being already in that position when the war broke out. He was then nearly sritics; nevertheless, he bore a reputation for genius as a commander. He was succeeded in the duties of general-in-chief in February, 1864, by Lieutenant-General Ulysses S. Grant. General Winfield Scott and his wife at their home in Elizabeth, New Jersey, in 1862. General Winfield Scott. General Henry Wager Halleck. this point into a neck but little more than one hundred miles in width. After this success, McClellan was placed, July 25, 1861, at the head of the newly created Distr
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