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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Denver (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
— Colonel of the 2d Cavalry. Marcus La Rue, of Arkansas— promoted for gallantry. Colorado John B. Slough, of Colorado— engaged in New Mexico. California Patrick E. Connor, of California—Colonel of the 3d Infantry. James Shields, brave Irish soldier, a friend of Lincoln. George S. Evans, originally Colonel of the 2d Cavalry. George W. Bowie, originally Colonel of the 5th Infantry. Edward McGarry, brevetted for conspicuous gallantry. James W. Denver; Denver, Colo., named after him. J. H. Carleton commanded a column in March across Arizona. This is the first of 29 groups embracing representative general officers of 34 states and territories. On preceding pages portraits appear of many leaders, including all the commanders of armies and army corps, and all generals killed in battle. Many others appear in preceding volumes, as identified with particular events or special branches, such as cavalry and artillery and the signal and medical corp
Alaska (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
came captain and then colonel of an Indiana Regiment, and led a division in the Army of the Southwest at Pea Ridge. As brigadier-general of volunteers, he served as division commander in Pope's Army of the Mississippi and also in that of the Cumberland, and took command of the Fourteenth Army Corps, August 22, 1864, and led it through Georgia and the Carolinas until the close of the war. He remained in the regular army as colonel, and was at one time commander of the United States troops in Alaska, and also was at the head of the troops that quelled the Modoc uprising of 1873, after the murder of Canby. He received the brevet of major-general in 1865. He died in Chicago, November 30, 1879. Brevet major-general Richard W. Johnson (U. S.M. A. 1849) was born in Livingston County, Kentucky, February 7, 1827, and saw his first service on the frontier. He entered the Civil War as captain of cavalry, becoming colonel of a Kentucky regiment. He served in the Army of tie Cumberland
Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
42) was born at Kingston, Ohio, September 6, 1818. He served in the Engineer Corps and as assistant professor at West Point. In 1854, he resigned from the army to practise architecture and civil engineering, but at the outbreak of the Civil War he tendered his services to the Government and was made brigadier-general of the regular army, and major-general of volunteers in March, 1862. He succeeded McClellan at the head of the army of occupation in western Virginia after his victory at Rich Mountain, and held it until Major-General Fremont took charge of the Mountain Department, March 29, 1862. From June 26th until the end of October, Rosecrans was Pope's successor in the Army of the Mississippi and, taking command of the District of Corinth, he defeated the Confederate forces at Iuka and Corinth. He now replaced Buell in the Army of the Cumberland. As general commanding he won the battle of Stone's River, but was defeated at Chickamauga, and was succeeded by Major-General George
Columbiana (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
of the Cumberland was made the Twentieth Army Corps on January 9, 1863, under Brigadier-General A. McD. McCook, who held it until October 9, 1863, when it was merged in the Fourth Corps, which had been created on September 28th. It was prominent in the engagement at Liberty Gap, Tennessee, June 25th, during the advance of the army to Tullahoma, and eight of its brigades were in the battle of Chickamauga. Major-General Alexander McDowell McCook (U. S.M. A. 1863) was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, April 22, 1831, and was the son of Major Daniel McCook, whose eight other sons also served in the Civil War. He did garrison duty in the West and was an instructor at West Point. He was colonel of the First Ohio at Bull Run, and then, as brigadier-general of volunteers, went to the department of the Ohio, where he had a command, and, later, a division at Shiloh and elsewhere, until he headed the First Corps, Army of the Ohio, in the Kentucky campaign against Bragg. He had been ma
Lundy's Lane (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e of all the army leaders not separately described in the pages that follow. The Index will refer to treatment in other volumes. Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott was born near Petersburg, Virginia, June 13, 1786. After being graduated from William and Mary College, he studied law, was admitted to the bar, and then entered the army at the age of twenty-two. His career was one of bravery and incident. He was captured by the British, but exchanged in 1813, fought in the battle of Lundy's Lane, and was severely wounded. After the close of the war he was raised to the rank of major-general, and in 1841 succeeded General Macomb as commander of the United States army. In the war with Mexico, he won great fame and was nominated by the Whigs for President in 1852; but he carried only four States. In 1855, Congress revived the rank of lieutenant-general and conferred it by brevet upon Scott, the appointment being dated March 29, 1847, the day of his brilliant capture of Vera Cruz.
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
created in May, 1861, and the troops therein were organized into the Seventh Army Corps on July 22, 1862. This corps was divided between Fort Monroe, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Yorktown, and other places. The Eighteenth Army Corps, created December 24, 1862, from troops in the Department of North Carolina was transferred to the Depar retired from the army in 1884. He died in Washington, July 2, 1899. Seventh Army Corps The troops in the Department of Virginia at Fort Monroe, Norfolk, Portsmouth, and elsewhere, were organized into the Seventh Army Corps, on July 22, 1862, which existed until discontinued on August 1, 1863, when the troops were merged in August, 1861, to the Department of Virginia, where he succeeded in saving Fort Monroe to the Federal Government. In May, 1862, his troops occupied Norfolk and Portsmouth Federal generals--no. 6 Iowa John Edwards Colonel of the 18th Infantry. Alexander chambers, promoted for gallantry. William T. Clark, pr
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, and in 1895 founded the Lincoln Memorial University and the industrial school at Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. Major-General Howard was a noted total-abstinence advocate and was much interested in Sunday-school work. He was retired with full rank in 1894, and he died at Burlington, Vermont, October, 26, 1909. Army of the Ohio and Army of the Cumberland The Department of Kentucky, which constituted the whole of that State within a hundred miles of the Ohio River, was merged in the Department of the Cumberland, comprising the States of Kentucky and Tennessee, August 15, 1861. On November 9th, it was renamed the Department of the Ohio, the States of Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana being added. The troops in this region (over whom McClellan, Rosecrans, O. M. Mitchel, Robert Anderson, and W. T. Sherman had, at different times and places, control) were now organized into the Army of the Ohio, with Major-General Don Carlos Buell in command. Although the
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
enth Army Corps on July 22, 1862. This corps was divided between Fort Monroe, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Yorktown, and other places. The Eighteenth Army Corps, created Dew Jersey. Major-General John Newton (U. S.M. A. 1842) was born in Norfolk, Virginia, August 24, 1823. After graduation he taught engineering at West Point fSeventh Army Corps The troops in the Department of Virginia at Fort Monroe, Norfolk, Portsmouth, and elsewhere, were organized into the Seventh Army Corps, on Julving Fort Monroe to the Federal Government. In May, 1862, his troops occupied Norfolk and Portsmouth Federal generals--no. 6 Iowa John Edwards Ced the District of Suffolk of the Seventh Army Corps, and captured the town of Norfolk in May. As major-general of volunteers, he was put at the head of the newly forming column at Spotsylvania. Egbert L. Viele, engaged at Fort Pulaski and Norfolk. Alexander Shaler commanded a brigade at Spotsylvania. Ninteenth Army
Karlsruhe (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 7
ed leader of Colored troops. George H. Gordon led a charge at Cedar Mountain. Charles P. Stone, later distinguished in the service of Egypt. Albert Ordway, promoted at the close of the War. N. A. miles commanded a brigade at Chancellorsville and later led a division in the Army of the Potomac. Henry L. Eustis, originally Colonel of the 10th regiment. Major-General Franz Sigel was born in Sinsheim, Baden, November 18, 1824, and was graduated from the Military School at Carlsruhe, becoming a champion of German unity and minister of war to the revolutionary Government of 1848, which was overthrown by Prussia. Later, having withdrawn to Switzerland, the Government expelled him, and he emigrated to America in 1852. He taught in a military institute in St. Louis and edited a military periodical. When the Civil War broke out, he organized the Third Missouri Infantry and an artillery battery, and after assisting Captain Lyon in the capture of Camp Jackson, he served i
Bardstown (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
865. He died in Philadelphia, March 19, 1884. First Corps—Army of the Ohio The Army of the Ohio was organized into three corps on September 29, 1862. The First was commanded by Major-General A. McDowell McCook. It bore the chief part in the battle of Perryville, Kentucky (October 8, 1862), and the campaign against Bragg in Kentucky. On October 24th, it was merged in the Fourteenth Corps, known as the Army of the Cumberland. Second Corps—Army of the Ohio This corps fought at Bardstown in the campaign against Bragg. It was headed by Major-General T. L. Crittenden. It constituted the right wing of the army, and was accompanied by Major-General George H. Thomas, who was second in command in the Army of the Ohio. Like the First Corps it had a brief existence, and it was merged in the Fourteenth Corps, October 24, 1862. Third Corps—Army of the Ohio This corps was commanded by Major-General C. C. Gilbert. It took part in the Kentucky campaign, but was only slightly <
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