hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
March 13th, 1865 AD 1,174 1,174 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 188 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman 155 7 Browse Search
Ulysses Simpson Grant 153 3 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 148 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 146 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 126 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 92 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 87 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 4,858 total hits in 1,332 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the Military Division of the James, the Department of the Pacific, and Department of the South until his death at Louisville, Kentucky, January 9, 1872. Major-General George Brinton McClellan (U. S.M. A. 1846) was born in Philadelphia, Decembom the Army June 1, 1864. He then became president of the Green River Iron Company, and, 1885-89, was pension-agent at Louisville. He died near Rockport, Kentucky, November 19, 1898. Major-General William Starke Rosecrans (U. S.M. A. 1842) wamy of Virginia was merged in the Army of the Potomac. Major-General John Pope (U. S.M. A. 1842) was born in Louisville, Kentucky, March 16, 1822. He served in the Mexican War, rising to the rank of captain. After this he did much work on enghe Atlanta campaign, and the last campaigns of Sherman. After the Grand Review of May 24, 1865, the corps went to Louisville, Kentucky, and one division served with the army of occupation at Little Rock, Arkansas. The corps was discontinued August
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
me vice-president of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, and later president of the Eastern Division of the Ohio and Missouri Railroad. He made his home in Cincinnati until the outbreak of the Civil War, when he tendered his services to his country and was made major-general of volunteers, April 21, 1861. The Department of the Ohio was constituted, and McClellan took command, May 13th, his appointment as major-general dating from the following day. He drove the Confederates from northwestern Virginia and saved that section to the Union, an accomplishment of the most vital importance, since, in the event of the establishment of the Confederacy, the Union territory would have been contracted at General Winfield Scott and Major-General Henry Wager Halleck. The upper photograph, as beautifully composed as a classic painting, shows General and Mrs. Scott at their home, Elizabeth, New Jersey, in 1862. A closer portrait study of the general appears below. Winfield Scott beca
Syracuse (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
s commanded by Major-General Henry W. Slocum, and constituted the left wing of Sherman's army. Major-General Henry Warner Slocum (U. S.M. A. 1852) was born in Delphi, New York, September 24, 1827, and, beginning the practice of law at Syracuse, New York, he resigned his commission as first lieutenant in 1855. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he joined McDowell's troops as colonel of the Twenty-seventh New York Volunteers, and at Bull Run was severely wounded. In August, 1861, as brigadi Burnside's reorganization of the army, he commanded the Right Grand Division. When Hooker was put at the head, Major-General Sumner was relieved at his own request, and sent to the Department of Missouri. But he died on the way there, at Syracuse, New York, March 21, 1863. Major-General Darius Nash Couch (U. S. M. A. 1846) was born in Putnam County, New York, July 23, 1822, and served in the Mexican and the Seminole wars, being brevetted first lieutenant in the former. In 1855, he res
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
gust 15, 1861. On November 9th, it was renamed the Department of the Ohio, the States of Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana being added. The troops in this region (over whom McClellan, Rosecrans, O. M. Mitof Mississippi, March, 1862, it was recreated on August 19th, to consist of the States of Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Kentucky, east of the Tennessee River, and Major-General H. corps itself at the battle of Fredericksburg. For a short time he was stationed in Indiana and Michigan, and had charge of the district of East Tennessee. He served again with the Ninth Corps in the siege and capture of Port Hudson. Edward W. Hinks originally Colonel of the 8th Infantry Michigan J. M. Oliver originally Colonel of the 15th regiment. Henry Baxter, promoted for gale 7th regiment; Governor in 1863. Willis A. Gorman, First commander of the 1st Minnesota. Michigan William Sanborn promoted for conspicuous gallantry. out he returned, and was made br
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
he remained in constant warfare with the Indians for many years. He obtained charge of all the tribes and did much for their advancement. In 1888, he attained the rank of major-general, and died in Chicago, March 21, 1890. Department of Virginia and North Carolina, Army of the James The Department of Virginia was created in May, 1861, and the troops therein were organized into the Seventh Army Corps on July 22, 1862. This corps was divided between Fort Monroe, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Yorktown, and other places. The Eighteenth Army Corps, created December 24, 1862, from troops in the Department of North Carolina was transferred to the Department of Virginia and North Carolina July 15, 1863, when the two departments were united, and the troops Federal major-generals commanding the first and second army corps Irvin McDowell commanded the 1st Corps in front of Washington. A. A. Humphreys commanded the 2d Corps at Petersburg. John Newton commanded the 1st Corps a
Trenton, Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
h to June, 1863, he was, as major-general of volunteers, at the head of the army itself. Later, as division commander of the Thirteenth Corps, he was present at the fall of Vicksburg, and also held command in Texas and at Port Hudson. He received the surrender of the Confederate forces west of the Mississippi in May, 1865. He resigned from the service in June, 1865, and practised law in New Orleans and New York. He died January 8, 1902. Major-General James G. blunt was born in Trenton, Maine, in 1826, and became a physician. He settled in Kansas, where he became prominent for his work in the anti-slavery movement. He went to the Civil War as lieutenant-colonel and was made brigadier-general of volunteers in April, 1862. He was placed at the head of the Department of Kansas on May 5, 1862, and when that department was merged in that of Missouri, on September 19th, he was given a division in the Army of the Frontier. On December 7th, his division and that of Brigadier-Gene
Redondo (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e won the battle of Stone's River, but was defeated at Chickamauga, and was succeeded by Major-General George H. Thomas. He then spent a year in command of the Department of Missouri, during which he drove Price out of the State, and on December 9, 1864, was relieved of active command. After resigning his commission, in 1866, he was United States minister to Mexico, and was in Congress from 1881 to 1885. In 1889, Congress restored him to the rank and pay of brigadier-general. He died at Redondo, California, March 11, 1898. Major-General George Henry Thomas (U. S. M.A. 1840) was born in Southampton County, Virginia, July 31, 1816. He served in the Seminole and Mexican wars, and had risen to the grade of lieutenant-colonel when the Civil War broke out. In August, 1861, he was made brigadier-general of volunteers. His first services in the war were rendered in the Departments of Pennsylvania and of the Shenandoah. His division of the Army of the Ohio defeated the Confederat
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Thomas Torbert (U. S.M. A. 1855) was born in Georgetown, Delaware, July 1, 1833. He entered the Civil War as colonel of the First New Jersey Volunteers, and commanded a brigade in the Sixth Army Corps. He had command of a division in the Sixth Corps, March-April, 1864, after which he had a division in the Cavalry Corps, and was given command of the Corps on August 6, 1864. He resigned in 1866, with the brevet of major-general of volunteers and served as United States consul-general at Havana in 1871. September 30, 1880, he was drowned in the wreck of the ill-fated steamer Vera Cruz off the Florida coast. Major-General Wesley Merritt (U. S.M. A. 1860) was born in New York, June 16, 1836. In 1861, he was at first, second and then first lieutenant of cavalry. He served throughout the Civil War, for the most part in the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac, where he rose to the command of the Cavalry Corps in the Shenandoah on January 26, 1865, and in the Army of the Potomac
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
68, he was governor of Ohio, and President Grant's Secretary of the Interior in 1869. He was prominent in politics, finance, and the law until his death, which occurred at Magnolia, Massachusetts, August 4, 1900. Federal generals no. 8 Maine Jonathan P. Cilley, gallant Cavalry leader. Seldon Connor, Colonel of the 19th regiment. Joshua L. Chamberlain, active at Round Top. L. G. Estes, promoted at the close of the War. Cyrus Hamlin, Colonel of the 80th U. S. Colored projects until his death, which occurred at Brooklyn, New York, April 7, 1888. Major-General Alfred Howe terry was born in Hartford, Connecticut, November 10, 1827. He was colonel of the Second Connecticut Federal generals—No. 9 Maine Charles H. Smith, conspicuous as a Cavalry leader. George F. Shepley, originally Colonel of the 20th regiment. Elias spear, Colonel of the 20th regiment. Maryland Frank Nickerson, originally Colonel of the 4th regiment.
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
regular army, he was sent to the West, where he remained in constant warfare with the Indians for many years. He obtained charge of all the tribes and did much for their advancement. In 1888, he attained the rank of major-general, and died in Chicago, March 21, 1890. Department of Virginia and North Carolina, Army of the James The Department of Virginia was created in May, 1861, and the troops therein were organized into the Seventh Army Corps on July 22, 1862. This corps was divided olonel, and was at one time commander of the United States troops in Alaska, and also was at the head of the troops that quelled the Modoc uprising of 1873, after the murder of Canby. He received the brevet of major-general in 1865. He died in Chicago, November 30, 1879. Brevet major-general Richard W. Johnson (U. S.M. A. 1849) was born in Livingston County, Kentucky, February 7, 1827, and saw his first service on the frontier. He entered the Civil War as captain of cavalry, becoming
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...