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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Garden City (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
30, 1864) he was placed on waiting orders September 28th, when he was put in command of the Northern Department. He retired from active service October 15, 1868, with the full rank of major-general in the regular army. General Hooker died at Garden City, Long Island, New York, October 31, 1879. The army of Georgia—on parade, General Slocum at the head Very different from the march through Georgia and the Carolinas was this magnificent parade of the Army of Georgia down Pennsylvania Aven, 1864, he was placed at the head of the Northern Department, and served at the head of other departments until he was retired, as the result of a paralytic stroke, with full rank of major-general, in October, 1868. His death occurred at Garden City, New York, October 31, 1879. Major-General George Gordon Meade (U. S. M.A. 1835) was born in Cadiz, Spain, December 31, 1815, while his father was American naval agent at that city. He saw service in the Seminole War, and then resigned in 1
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): chapter 7
death at Louisville, Kentucky, January 9, 1872. Major-General George Brinton McClellan (U. S.M. A. 1846) was born in Philadelphia, December 3, 1826. He served in the Engineer Corps during the Mexican War, distinguished himself by gallant service, and reached the rank of captain in 1855, having been so brevetted in 1847. He became assistant instructor in practical engineering at West Point, later accompanied the Red River exploring expedition, and was sent on a secret mission to Santo Domingo. During the Crimean War, he was one of a commission of three appointed by Congress to study and report upon the whole art of European warfare. He remained some time with the British forces. McClellan's report was a model of comprehensive accuracy and conciseness, and showed him to be a master of siege-tactics. In 1857, McClellan resigned his army commission to devote himself to the practice of engineering. He became vice-president of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, and later
Sandy Hill, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ina, the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, the Department and Army of the Ohio, and the Department of the South. He became major-general of volunteers in July, 1862. Being mustered out of the volunteer service in 1866, he, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel of engineers, continued his work on important engineering projects of the Government. He died in Nashua, New Hampshire, September 2, 1874. Brevet major-general John Henry Martindale (U. S.M. A. 1835) was born at Sandy Hill, New York, March 20, 1815. He resigned from the army the year after leaving West Point, but, offering his services at the outbreak of the Civil War, he was made brigadier-general of volunteers in August, 1861. He was brigade commander in several corps of the Army of the Potomac, and in February, 1863, took charge of the troops in the District of Washington—a portion of the Twenty-second Army Corps. In May, 1864, he was assigned to a division in the Eighteenth Army Corps, and for a short peri
at West Point, later accompanied the Red River exploring expedition, and was sent on a secret mission to Santo Domingo. During the Crimean War, he was one of a commission of three appointed by Congress to study and report upon the whole art of European warfare. He remained some time with the British forces. McClellan's report was a model of comprehensive accuracy and conciseness, and showed him to be a master of siege-tactics. In 1857, McClellan resigned his army commission to devote himsel(July, 1864), and he commanded the Fifteenth Army Corps on the march to the sea. He was Major-General Canby's chief-of-staff in 1865. After the war he resigned from the service, and was American consul at Lyons, France. Thereafter, remaining in Europe, he made his home in Mannheim, Germany. Sixteenth Army Corps Created from three divisions and troops of several districts of the Thirteenth Army Corps on December 18, 1862, with Major-General S. A. Hurlbut in command. The corps was much di
Brooklyn (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
on's attack, and later was present at the surrender of the Confederate Army. He resigned his commission in 1865, and devoted himself to the law. He died in Brooklyn, New York, April 14, 1894. Federal major-generals commanders of the fifth and sixth army corps Fitz John Porter commanded the Fifth Corps on the Penindian fighting, and in 1891 was retired from active service. He died in Baltimore, February 6, 1896. Major-General Francis Channing Barlow was born in Brooklyn, New York, October 19, 1834, and was a Harvard graduate of 1855. He enlisted as a private in the Twelfth New York Militia, and after the three months service had expvice after the war, he rose to rank of colonel in the regular army and was connected with many great engineering projects until his death, which occurred at Brooklyn, New York, April 7, 1888. Major-General Alfred Howe terry was born in Hartford, Connecticut, November 10, 1827. He was colonel of the Second Connecticut
Georgetown, Del. (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
auga and Missionary Ridge. In April, 1864, he was transferred to the command of the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, and in August he was put at the head of the Army of the Shenandoah and defeated Early at Cedar Creek. In December, 1864, he was made major-general in the regular army, lieutenant-general in March, 1869, and general June 1, 1888. He died in Nonquit, Massachusetts, August 5, 1888. Brevet major-general Alfred Thomas Thomas Torbert (U. S.M. A. 1855) was born in Georgetown, Delaware, July 1, 1833. He entered the Civil War as colonel of the First New Jersey Volunteers, and commanded a brigade in the Sixth Army Corps. He had command of a division in the Sixth Corps, March-April, 1864, after which he had a division in the Cavalry Corps, and was given command of the Corps on August 6, 1864. He resigned in 1866, with the brevet of major-general of volunteers and served as United States consul-general at Havana in 1871. September 30, 1880, he was drowned in the wrec
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
oston, and quartermaster-general and adjutant-general of Connecticut. He died in Norwalk, Connecticut, February 12, 1897. nst the Indians in the Federal generals--no. 2 Connecticut Henry W. Birge, of Connecticut, commander of a Connecticut, commander of a division in the 19th Corps. Orris S. Ferry, of Connecticut, Colonel of the 5th regiment, later U. S. Senator. Joseph R. HConnecticut, Colonel of the 5th regiment, later U. S. Senator. Joseph R. Hawley, of Connecticut, distinguished at the battle of the Olustee. Henry W. Wessells, of Connecticut, led troops on the PeConnecticut, distinguished at the battle of the Olustee. Henry W. Wessells, of Connecticut, led troops on the Peninsula in 1862. H. H. Lockwood, of Delaware, commander of a brigade at Gettysburg. Daniel Tyler, of Connecticut, led theConnecticut, led troops on the Peninsula in 1862. H. H. Lockwood, of Delaware, commander of a brigade at Gettysburg. Daniel Tyler, of Connecticut, led the advance at Bull Run, 1861. Robert O. Tyler, of Connecticut, commanded artillery at Fredericksburg. Delaware Connecticut, led the advance at Bull Run, 1861. Robert O. Tyler, of Connecticut, commanded artillery at Fredericksburg. Delaware Lorenzo Thomas, of Delaware, adjutant-general of the United States Army. Dakota John B. S. Todd, of Dakota TerrConnecticut, commanded artillery at Fredericksburg. Delaware Lorenzo Thomas, of Delaware, adjutant-general of the United States Army. Dakota John B. S. Todd, of Dakota Territory, appointed Brigadier-General to date from September 19, 1861. Northwest. He was made brigadier-general in 1884, and w
Livingston (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
y Corps, August 22, 1864, and led it through Georgia and the Carolinas until the close of the war. He remained in the regular army as colonel, and was at one time commander of the United States troops in Alaska, and also was at the head of the troops that quelled the Modoc uprising of 1873, after the murder of Canby. He received the brevet of major-general in 1865. He died in Chicago, November 30, 1879. Brevet major-general Richard W. Johnson (U. S.M. A. 1849) was born in Livingston County, Kentucky, February 7, 1827, and saw his first service on the frontier. He entered the Civil War as captain of cavalry, becoming colonel of a Kentucky regiment. He served in the Army of tie Cumberland and its prior organizations. His commission as brigadier-general of volunteers was dated October 19, 1861. As cavalry commander, he was captured by Morgan in August, 1862. He commanded a division at Stone's River, Chickamauga, and Chattanooga, and was severely wounded at New Hope Church.
Columbus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Schoepff, Mitchell, and Sheridan and Colonel Kennett. It was merged in the Fourteenth Corps, October 24, 1862. Cavalry Corps—Military division of the Mississippi The First Cavalry Corps in the West was organized in October, 1864, with Brevet Major-General J. H. Wilson at its head. There were seven divisions, of which four took part in the battle of Nashville, December 15th and 16th. Wilson entered Alabama in March, 1865, and the corps fought its last engagement with Forrest at Columbus, Georgia, on April 16th. One division of this corps, under Brigadier-General Judson Kilpatrick, consisting of four brigades, accompanied Sherman's army through Georgia and the Carolinas, and was present at Bentonville and Johnston's surrender. Federal generals--no. 21 Ohio (continued) Emerson Opdycke, brevetted for gallantry at the battle of Franklin. Henry Van Ness Boynton, Decorated for gallantry in action. Joseph Warren Keifer, originally Colonel of the 110th regiment.
Breckinridge (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
division commander in the Department of the Tennessee (Thirteenth Army Corps). He commanded a division in the Yazoo Expedition, and was the first commander of the reorganized Thirteenth Corps which he led at the capture of Arkansas Post (January, 1863). Ill-health compelled him to resign from the service in June, 1863. In 1868 and 1870, he was a member of Congress. He died at Old Point Comfort, Virginia, July 26, 1893. Major-General John Alexander McClernand was born in Breckinridge County, Kentucky, May 30, 1812. He became a lawyer and served in the Black Hawk War as private. He was a member of Congress when the Civil War broke out and resigned to enter it, being made brigadier-general of volunteers in May, 1861. He first distinguished himself at Belmont, November 7, 1861. After Fort Donelson, he was made major-general of volunteers in the Army of West Tennessee, and commanded a division at Shiloh. On January 4, 1863, he replaced Sherman in command of the Yazoo Expedit
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