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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Manheim (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
hiefly from the Eighth and Twenty-second corps. The corps fought in the battles of the Army of the Potomac, and two divisions were sent to the assistance of the Army of Virginia at Second Bull Run and Chantilly. On March 24, 1864, it was merged in the Second Corps. Its commanders were Brigadier-Generals S. P. Heintzelman and George Stoneman, and Major-Generals D. E. Sickles, D. B. Birney, and W. H. French. Major-General Samuel peter Heintzelman (U. S.M. A. 1826) was born in Manheim, Pennsylvania, September 30, 1805, and served on the frontier, in Florida, in the Mexican War, and in California and Texas. At the opening of the Civil War he was promoted to a colonelcy, and became inspector-general of the defenses of Washington. In May, 1861, he was placed in command at Alexandria, Virginia. He headed the Third Division at Bull Run, and in subsequent organizations of the Army of the Potomac he had a brigade, a division, and afterward the Third Corps, which he commanded until
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ia, June 13, 1786. After being graduated from William and Mary College, he studied law, was admitted to the bar, and then entered the army at the age of twenty-two. His career was one of bravery and incident. He was captured by the British, but exchanged in 1813, fought in the battle of Lundy's Lane, and was severely wounded. After the close of the war he was raised to the rank of major-general, and in 1841 succeeded General Macomb as commander of the United States army. In the war with Mexico, he won great fame and was nominated by the Whigs for President in 1852; but he carried only four States. In 1855, Congress revived the rank of lieutenant-general and conferred it by brevet upon Scott, the appointment being dated March 29, 1847, the day of his brilliant capture of Vera Cruz. It was evident that his age and infirmities would prevent his taking any active part in the Civil War, and on November 1, 1861, he was retired from the chief command of the army of the United States.
Utah (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
rade of brigadier-general in 1884, being retired in 1886. His most renowned achievement was the removal of the reefs at Hell Gate in the harbor of New York. General Newton was commissioner of public works, New York city, from 1887 to 1888, and then president of the Panama Railroad Company. He died, May 1, 1895. Miajor-General John Fulton Reynolds (U. S. M.A. 1841) was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, September 20, 1820, and served in the Mexican War, and in the Rogue River Indian and Utah expeditions. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was commandant at West Point, but with the rank of brigadier-general of volunteers took active part in the operations of the Army of the Potomac from August, 1861. He commanded a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves which was merged in the First Corps, Army of the Potomac. He went with McDowell to the Department of the Rappahannock but returned to the Army of the Potomac at the head of a brigade in the Fifth Corps, for the move to the James
Licking county (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
a division of the Fifth Army Corps and was commander for several short periods, notably at the battle of Gettysburg. His commission of major-general of volunteers was dated November 29, 1862. In SeptemberOctober, 1864, he was in command of the District of South Kansas. After leaving the volunteer service he was made colonel in the regular army, where he remained until he died in Brownsville, Texas, February 9, 1880. Major-General Charles Griffin (U. S.M. A. 1847) was born in Licking County, Ohio, in 1826, and served in the Mexican War and on the frontier. He was captain when the Civil War broke out, at the head of the Fifth Artillery. His battery fought with great bravery at Bull Run. As brigadier-general of volunteers, he had a brigade and then a division in the Fifth Army Corps, and took part in most of its important battles. He was given command of the corps on April 1, 1865, from which dated his appointment as major-general of volunteers. He led his corps in the fina
San Juan River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
bia in 1819, and served in the Mexican War. He had reached the rank of captain when the Civil War broke out, and was promoted to brigadier-general of volunteers in September, 1861. He was commander of the Department of Key West from February, 1862, until it was merged, the following month, in the Department of the South, of which he was twice in command, as well as temporarily at the head of the Tenth Army Corps between September, 1862, and January, 1863. During this period he led the St. John's River expedition and took part in the battle of Pocotaligo. After this, he commanded divisions in the Twenty-first and Fourteenth corps. He reorganized the artillery in the Army of the Cumberland, and placed the artillery for the defense of Atlanta. He was mustered out of the volunteer service, having been brevetted major-general of volunteers, in May, 1866, and continued in the regular army as lieutenant-colonel and colonel, but with the brevet of major-general, serving at various posts u
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t Bull Run. He returned home to raise the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, and with this regiment served under Brigadier-General T. W. Sherman at the capture of Port Royal and under Major-General Hunter at Fort Pulaski, which he then commanded. Being raised to brigadier-general of volunteers in April, 1862, he commanded several dof Brigadier-General T. W. Sherman in September and October, 1861. It consisted of three brigades. This was the force that assisted the navy at the capture of Port Royal, occupying the abandoned works and garrisoning the base thus secured. It formed the nucleus of the Department of the South and the Tenth Army Corps. Brigadi-general of volunteers, May 17, 1861. He was placed at the head of the South Carolina Expeditional Corps and commanded the land forces in the operations around Port Royal. After that, he commanded a division in Grant's Army of West Tennessee. In September, 1862, he was put at the head of the Federal troops at Carrollton, Louisi
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
manded the Ninth Corps at Petersburg. Orlando B. Willcox commanded the Ninth Army Corps in 1863-4. Major-General John Charles Fremont was born in Savannah, Georgia, January 21, 1813. He became professor of mathematics in the United States navy, and was commissioned second lieutenant in the Corps of Topographical Enginetil November 7th, was commanded by Brigadier-Generals W. H. Emory and Cuvier Grover, and after the campaign in the Shenandoah, it went, in different sections, to Savannah. Some of the troops were afterward attached to the Tenth Corps; others remained in Savannah until the corps was discontinued on March 20, 1865, and even longer.Savannah until the corps was discontinued on March 20, 1865, and even longer. On November 7, 1864, the portion of the corps that had remained in Louisiana was discontinued, and the designation, Nineteenth Army Corps, passed to the divisions operating in the Shenandoah valley. Most of the troops in Louisiana were put in the Gulf Reserve Corps, which, in February, 1865, became the new Thirteenth Corps, and
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ragut opened up the lower Mississippi, and in Kentucky and Tennessee resulted in the capture of Fort in this army was the driving of Bragg out of Kentucky, for this, with the preceding Tennessee campa, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Kentucky, east of the Tennessee River, and Major-Generrigg Canby (U. S.M. A. 1839) was born in Kentucky in 1819. Entering the army, he served in the Louisiana—Colonel of the Second Cavalry. Kentucky Speed S. fry noted for his encounterkamauga. Theophilus T. Garrard, defender of Kentucky and East Tennessee. James M. Schackleford,nnessee. N. B. Buford, leader of Cavalry in Kentucky and Tennessee. transferred to the Departmetacks on Island No.10, in other activities in Kentucky and Tennessee, and headed a brigade in the Arat Shiloh. In the campaign against Bragg, in Kentucky, he commanded the Second Corps, Army of the Or 8, 1862), and the campaign against Bragg in Kentucky. On October 24th, it was merged in the Fourt[7 more...]<
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ervatory at Albany, New York, when the Civil War broke out, and entered the army, receiving a commission of brigadier-general of volunteers. From September to November, 1861, he was at the head of the Department of the Ohio, and had a division in the Army of the Ohio, December, 1861, to July, 1862, during which he made a brilliant expedition into Alabama, and won promotion to major-general of volunteers. In September, he was placed at the head of the Tenth Army Corps and died at Hilton Head, South Carolina, of yellow fever, October 27, 1862. He made several important astronomical discoveries. Brevet major-general John Milton Brannan (U. S.M. A. 1841) was born in the District of Columbia in 1819, and served in the Mexican War. He had reached the rank of captain when the Civil War broke out, and was promoted to brigadier-general of volunteers in September, 1861. He was commander of the Department of Key West from February, 1862, until it was merged, the following month, in th
Five Forks (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
George Crook (U. S.M. A. 1852) was born near Dayton, Ohio, September 8, 1828. He spent the nine years before the opening of the Civil War in California. As brigadier-general of volunteers in the Army of the Cumberland, he commanded a division of cavalry. He succeeded Major-General David Hunter in the command of the Department of West Virginia in August, 1864, and shortly afterward was made major-general of volunteers. He was active in the Shenandoah campaign under Sheridan; also at Five Forks and Appomattox. In 1866, as lieutenant-colonel of the regular army, he was sent to the West, where he remained in constant warfare with the Indians for many years. He obtained charge of all the tribes and did much for their advancement. In 1888, he attained the rank of major-general, and died in Chicago, March 21, 1890. Department of Virginia and North Carolina, Army of the James The Department of Virginia was created in May, 1861, and the troops therein were organized into the Se
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