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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
y 1st to January 21st, except that the report of issues for the Departments of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana are still due for the month of December. I wade in regard to the sale of cloth, that the Department Officer at Montgomery. Alabama, has disposed of 7,000 yards single width, and that 1,000 suits are now being 045,853 61,860108,93755,560  also 7,000 captured by Forrest.   Department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana: Aggregate amount third and fourth quarters 1ments with the Quartermaster-General to supply the distilleries in Georgia and Alabama, so soon as they are ready to commence operations, and it is recommended that ugh our lines on the Mississippi river, and the gulf border of Mississippi and Alabama. Cotton is exchanged for medical supplies, and in consequence of the recent dtilleries, and to import medicines freely through our lines in Mississippi and Alabama, no fear need be entertained that the sick and wounded of the army will suffer
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
Sims, Lieutenant-Colonel Quartermaster. Brigadier-General Lawton, Quartermaster-General. Confederate States of America, War Department, Engineer Bureau, Richmond, Virginia, 16th February, 1865. Hon. J. C. Breckinridge, Secretary War: Sir — I have somewhat delayed answering the circular from your office of the 7th instant, i With great respect, Your obedient servant, J. F. Gilmer, Major-General and Chief of Bureau. Confederate States of America, Surgeon-General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, February 9th, 1865. Sir — In reply to the circular of the 7th instant, from your office, I have the honor to submit the following report: By recent ithrough our lines in Mississippi and Alabama, no fear need be entertained that the sick and wounded of the army will suffer for the want of any of the essential articles of the supply table. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. P. Moore, Surgeon-General C. S. A. Hon. John C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.
Demopolis (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
The assignments of the few military engineers, who joined the Southern army at the commencement of the war, to duty with troops, has been a serious drawback to the engineer service, which has therefore been performed in a great measure by civil engineers, who have been appointed from time to time in the corps. 2d. Engineer workshops, for the manufacture of tools, implements and preparation of material for pontoon bridges, have been established at Richmond, Charleston, Augusta, Mobile, Demopolis, and in the Trans-Mississippi Department, from which the calls from the different armies and departments have been, as far as practicable, supplied. The great difficulty in this direction has been the want of materials, particularly iron for tools and bridge constructions, a want owing principally to the disturbed condition of the country and defective transportation. Entrenching tools have been obtained by importation to a considerable extent, and funds have been sent abroad to purcha
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
hospitals arises from the failure of the Commissary Department to furnish the hospital funds. Very general complaint has been made on this subject-one of importance, as without the hospital fund, it is impossible to supply the sick and wounded with the necessary supplies. The hospitals have also been embarrassed by the non-payment of the hospital attendants by the Quartermaster's Department. Attention has been given recently to the importation of supplies through our lines on the Mississippi river, and the gulf border of Mississippi and Alabama. Cotton is exchanged for medical supplies, and in consequence of the recent disaster at Wilmington, it is believed that this trade will constitute the chief source of supply. This Department has obtained medicines in this manner through the energy of Surgeon Richard Potts, who has had exclusive control of the importation of such articles as are most needed, until recent orders from the War Department, taking entire control of transactio
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
achinery as was adapted to carrying a light train very rapidly. So long as the army could draw supplies from any quarter, and the lines running south as far as Wilmington and Charlotte, were called on only to transport men, the work was performed promptly and well, but when supplies failed in Virginia and North Carolina, and Georcast steel, files, &c., &c., without which it is impossible to maintain engines. They are as necessary as iron. Heretofore a small supply has been had through Wilmington, but with that port closed, we are cut off entirely, except by trading with the enemy, and paying in cotton. With plenty of mechanics and material, the machinen the Mississippi river, and the gulf border of Mississippi and Alabama. Cotton is exchanged for medical supplies, and in consequence of the recent disaster at Wilmington, it is believed that this trade will constitute the chief source of supply. This Department has obtained medicines in this manner through the energy of Surgeon
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
nts in the Confederacy. The report shows the issues to General Lee's command from July 1st to January 21st, and to other commands from July 1st to January 21st, except that the report of issues for the Departments of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana are still due for the month of December. I was gratified that information now given was asked, for the impression is so common that our armies are poorly provided for, that I gladly avail of an opportunity to show what has been done. I en5121,02226,37612,429500 19,26420,57126,719594 Army of Tennessee: Aggregate amount third and fourth quarters 186445,412102,864102,55827,90045,853 61,860108,93755,560  also 7,000 captured by Forrest.   Department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana: Aggregate amount third and fourth quarters 186421,78937,66134,3424,67727,292 10,0953,83115,458  Department of North Carolina: Aggregate amount third and fourth quarters 186421,30137,7749,2636,69612,751 23,35422,57915,059200 Richmond,
Griswoldsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
ite uncertain. At present the want is not so serious as the want of mechanics, though it may become so if the materials are not obtained. It may not be out of place to mention that notwithstanding the scarcity and value of this kind of transportation, it receives but little protection or security from our armies, which seems strange when not only their comfort but their safety depends on its efficiency. As cases in point, and of recent date, is the loss of cars and engines at Atlanta, Griswoldville, Gordon and Savannah, footing up probably twenty-five engines and four hundred cars, or an equipment greater than we now have to work the Richmond and Danville Railroad. I am, General, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, F. W. Sims, Lieutenant-Colonel Quartermaster. Brigadier-General Lawton, Quartermaster-General. Confederate States of America, War Department, Engineer Bureau, Richmond, Virginia, 16th February, 1865. Hon. J. C. Breckinridge, Secretary War: Sir — I ha
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
transportation, it receives but little protection or security from our armies, which seems strange when not only their comfort but their safety depends on its efficiency. As cases in point, and of recent date, is the loss of cars and engines at Atlanta, Griswoldville, Gordon and Savannah, footing up probably twenty-five engines and four hundred cars, or an equipment greater than we now have to work the Richmond and Danville Railroad. I am, General, Very respectfully, Your obedient ser countries through the blockade, attention was given at an early day to the establishment of medical laboratories, and the manufacture of medicines at Lincolnton, North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, Macon and Atlanta, Georgia, and Mobile and Montgomery, Alabama. While these laboratories have been engaged more especially in the manufacture of medicines, heretofore universally procured from abroad. great attention has been given to the manufacture of indigenous r
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
and in the departments in which the divisions are, from which they are taken as follows: Army of Northern Virginia12 companies. Army of Tennessee10 companies. Department of North Carolina1 company. Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida2 companies. District of the Gulf1 company. Trans-Mississippi Department9 companies.   Total35 companies. Of these companies, three with the army of Tennessee, and three in the Trans-Mississippi Department have not as yet, however, been fully organized. It is proposed to create one more in the Trans-Mississippi, thus making a full regiment, and one more in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, to be employed chiefly as artisans. As there is still an urgent demand for engineer officers, an application has been made, on my recommendation, to Congress for (22) twenty-two additional officers in the provisional corps. This bill has passed the Senate, and will, it is hoped, at an early day be favorably consider
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.16
delays in procuring the funds, and from the fact that no one has yet been selected to proceed to Texas in charge of the operations to be undertaken, we cannot expect to receive a first instalment froddle of March, and to obtain any at all now within the period named, a proper officer must be in Texas to conduct business. I have also proposed that I shall be provided with means and authority t, in order to secure the needed supplies: First. With respect to the operations in Mexico and Texas, I estimated that the sum of £ 350,000 in sterling or gold turned over to me, say at the rate oft would be furnished by the Treasury. I received letters of credit for £ 50,000, and sent it to Texas by Major W. S. Harris, and further amounts are now required. An officer to control and manage te. No one has been yet assigned to the duty. Nothing can be done until such officer arrives in Texas. Second. The purchase of horses and mules to be delivered in Mississippi from the enemy's lin
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