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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.17
who has never been a soldier does not know, nor indeed can know, the amount of comfort there is in a good soft hat in camp, and now utterly useless is a soldier hat as they are generally made. Why the Prussians, with all their experience, wear their heavy, unyielding helmets, and the French their little caps, is a mystery to a Confederate who has enjoyed the comfort of an old slouch. Overcoats an inexperienced man would think an absolute necessity for men exposed to the rigors of a Northern Virginia winter, but they grew scarcer and scarcer. They were found a great inconvenience and burden. The men came to the conclusion that the trouble of carrying them hot days outweighed the comfort of having them when the cold day arrived. Besides they found that life in the open air hardened them to such an extent, that the changes in the temperature were not felt to any degree. Some clung to their overcoats to the last, but the majority got tired lugging them around, and either discarded
Detailed Minutiae of soldier life in the Army of Northern Virginia. By Carlton McCarthy, Private of Second Company Richmond Howitzers, Cutshaw's Battalion. [Many of our boys who wore the gray will be glad to see these vivid pictures of what they experienced, and many others will rejoice to have these details of soldier life. And these minutiae are by no means beneath the notice of the grave historians who would know and tell the whole truth concerning our grand old army.] Paper no. 1.--the outfit modified. With the men who composed the Army of Northern Virginia will die the memory of those little things which made the Confederate soldier peculiarly what he was. The historian who essays to write the grand movements will hardly stop to tell how the hungry private fried his bacon, baked his biscuit and smoked his pipe; how he was changed from time to time by the necessities of the service, until the gentleman, the student, the merchant, the mechanic and the farmer were me
inter time, and the favorite style was buck gauntlets with long cuffs. Quite a large number had a boy along to do the cooking and washing. Think of it? a Confederate soldier with a body servant all his own, to bring him a drink of water, black his boots, dust his clothes, cook his corn bread and bacon, and put wood on his fire. Never was there fonder admiration than these darkies displayed for their masters. Their chief delight and glory was to praise the courage and good looks of Mahse Tom, and prophesy great things about his future. Many a ringing laugh and shout of fun originated in the queer remarks, shining countenance and glistening teeth of this now forever departed character. It is amusing to think of the follies of the early part of the war, as illustrated by the outfits of the volunteers. They were so heavily clad, and so burdened with all manner of things, that a march was torture, and the wagon trains were so immense in proportion to the number of troops, tha
Carlton McCarthy (search for this): chapter 3.17
Detailed Minutiae of soldier life in the Army of Northern Virginia. By Carlton McCarthy, Private of Second Company Richmond Howitzers, Cutshaw's Battalion. [Many of our boys who wore the gray will be glad to see these vivid pictures of what they experienced, and many others will rejoice to have these details of soldier life. And these minutiae are by no means beneath the notice of the grave historians who would know and tell the whole truth concerning our grand old army.] Paper no. 1.--the outfit modified. With the men who composed the Army of Northern Virginia will die the memory of those little things which made the Confederate soldier peculiarly what he was. The historian who essays to write the grand movements will hardly stop to tell how the hungry private fried his bacon, baked his biscuit and smoked his pipe; how he was changed from time to time by the necessities of the service, until the gentleman, the student, the merchant, the mechanic and the farmer were mer
ed and big flat heeled brogues or brogans succeeded the boots, and were found much more comfortable and agreeable, easier put on and off, and altogether the most sensible. A short waisted, single breasted jacket usurped the place of the long tail coat, and became universal. The enemy noticed this peculiarity, and called the Confederates gray jackets, which name was immediately transferred to those lively creatures, which were the constant admirers and inseparable companions of the Boys in Gray and Blue. Caps were destined to hold out longer than some other uncomfortable things, but they finally yielded to the demands of comfort and common sense, and a good soft felt hat was worn instead. A man who has never been a soldier does not know, nor indeed can know, the amount of comfort there is in a good soft hat in camp, and now utterly useless is a soldier hat as they are generally made. Why the Prussians, with all their experience, wear their heavy, unyielding helmets, and the Fre
his pipe; how he was changed from time to time by the necessities of the service, until the gentleman, the student, the merchant, the mechanic and the farmer were merged into a perfect, all-enduring, never-tiring and invincible soldier. To preserve these little details, familiar to all soldiers, and by them not thought worthy of mention to others, because of their familiarity, but still dear to them and always the substance of their war talks, is the object of this paper. The volunteer of 1861 made extensive preparations for the field. Boots, he thought, were an absolute necessity, and the heavier the soles and longer the tops the better. His pants were stuffed inside the tops of his boots, of course. A double-breasted coat, heavily wadded, with two rows of big brass buttons and a long skirt, was considered comfortable. A small stiff cap, with a narrow brim, took the place of the comfortable felt or the shining and towering tile worn in civil life. Then over all was a huge o