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York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.27
olonel — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Third Army Corps during and subsequent to the battle of Gettysburg: On the morning of the 29th of June the Third Corps, composed of the divisions of Major-Generals Anderson, Heth and Pender, and five battalions of artillery, under command of Colonel R. L. Walker, was encamped on the road from Chambersburg to Gettysburg, near the village of Fayetteville. I was directed to move on this road in the direction of York, and to cross the Susquehanna, menacing the communications of Harrisburg with Philadelphia, and to co-operate with General Ewell, acting as circumstances might require. Accordingly, on the 29th I moved General Heth's division to Cashtown, some eight miles from Gettysburg, following on the morning of the 30th with the division of General Pender, and directing General Anderson to move in same direction on the morning of the 1st of July. On arriving at Cashtown, General Heth, who had sent forw
Emmetsburg (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.27
r-General Heth was slightly wounded. Brigadier-General Archer was taken prisoner by the enemy. Brigadier-General Scales was also wounded. Pettigrew's brigade, under its gallant leader, fought most admirably, and sustained heavily loss. On the morning of the 2d July, Anderson was ordered forward to the front, and relieved Heth's division, extending to our right and along a crest of hills which faced the Cemetery Hill at Gettysburg, and extending to the right ran nearly parallel to the Emmetsburg road. On the second, then, my position was this: Pender's division occupying the crest from the Theological Seminary, extending to the right, and joined by Anderson, who carried on the line, almost entirely covering the whole front occupied by the enemy, Heth's division (now commanded by General Pettigrew) in reserve. Colonel Walker had distributed his artillery along this line in the most eligible positions. The corps of General Longstreet (McLaw's and Hood's divisions) was on my right
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.27
ce at Washington. Its importance and value will be appreciated.] Report.headquarters Third Army corps. Colonel — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Third Army Corps during and subsequent to the battle of Gettysburg: On the morning of the 29th of June the Third Corps, composed of the divisions of Major-Generals Anderson, Heth and Pender, and five battalions of artillery, under command of Colonel R. L. Walker, was encamped on the road from Chambersburg to Gettysburg, near the village of Fayetteville. I was directed to move on this road in the direction of York, and to cross the Susquehanna, menacing the communications of Harrisburg with Philadelphia, and to co-operate with General Ewell, acting as circumstances might require. Accordingly, on the 29th I moved General Heth's division to Cashtown, some eight miles from Gettysburg, following on the morning of the 30th with the division of General Pender, and directing General Anderson to
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.27
be appreciated.] Report.headquarters Third Army corps. Colonel — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Third Army Corps during and subsequent to the battle of Gettysburg: On the morning of the 29th of June the Third Corps, composed of the divisions of Major-Generals Anderson, Heth and Pender, and five battalions of artillery, under command of Colonel R. L. Walker, was encamped on the road from Chambersburg to Gettysburg, near the village of Fayetteville. I was directed to move on this road in the direction of York, and to cross the Susquehanna, menacing the communications of Harrisburg with Philadelphia, and to co-operate with General Ewell, acting as circumstances might require. Accordingly, on the 29th I moved General Heth's division to Cashtown, some eight miles from Gettysburg, following on the morning of the 30th with the division of General Pender, and directing General Anderson to move in same direction on the morning of the 1st
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.27
rection of York, and to cross the Susquehanna, menacing the communications of Harrisburg with Philadelphia, and to co-operate with General Ewell, acting as circumstances might require. Accordingly, on the 29th I moved General Heth's division to Cashtown, some eight miles from Gettysburg, following on the morning of the 30th with the division of General Pender, and directing General Anderson to move in same direction on the morning of the 1st of July. On arriving at Cashtown, General Heth, who Cashtown, General Heth, who had sent forward Pettigrew's brigade to Gettysburg, reported that Pettigrew had encountered the enemy at Gettysburg, principally cavalry, but in what force he could not determine. A courier was then dispatched with this information to the General Commanding, and to start Anderson early; also to General Ewell, informing him, and that I intended to advance the next morning and discover what was in my front. On the first of July, at five o'clock, Heth took up the line of march, with Pegram's batt
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.27
as encamped on the road from Chambersburg to Gettysburg, near the village of Fayetteville. I was di division to Cashtown, some eight miles from Gettysburg, following on the morning of the 30th with t who had sent forward Pettigrew's brigade to Gettysburg, reported that Pettigrew had encountered the enemy at Gettysburg, principally cavalry, but in what force he could not determine. A courier was ing with Anderson. About three miles from Gettysburg, his advance brigade, Archer's, encountered driven back to the wooded hills this side of Gettysburg, where their principal force (since ascertai the crest of a hill overlooking the town of Gettysburg. Heth's division drove the enemy, encountere enemy, and driving him through the town of Gettysburg. The want of cavalry had been and was against of hills which faced the Cemetery Hill at Gettysburg, and extending to the right ran nearly paralught off three guns captured on the field at Gettysburg. On the 21st the march was resumed towards
Fairfield, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.27
at end, Wilcox and Perrin were moved forward to eligible positions. The assault failed, and after almost gaining the enemy's works, our troops fell back in disorder. The enemy made no attempt to pursue. Major-General Trimble, Brigadier-General Pettigrew and Colonel Fry (commanding Archer's brigade) were wounded while most gallantly leading their troops. The troops resumed their former positions and remained thus until the night of the 4th, when the march was taken towards Hagerstown by Fairfield and Waynesboroa. At Hagerstown we lay in line of battle from the 7th to the night of the 13th, when I moved my corps in the direction of the pontoon bridge at Falling Water. Being the rear guard of the army, such dispositions as were necessary were made to repel any advance of the enemy. Anderson's division crossed without molestation, and Pender's was in the act of crossing when the enemy made their appearance. A small body of cavalry charged Pettigrew's brigade, and were annihilate
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.27
er-General Pettigrew and Colonel Fry (commanding Archer's brigade) were wounded while most gallantly leading their troops. The troops resumed their former positions and remained thus until the night of the 4th, when the march was taken towards Hagerstown by Fairfield and Waynesboroa. At Hagerstown we lay in line of battle from the 7th to the night of the 13th, when I moved my corps in the direction of the pontoon bridge at Falling Water. Being the rear guard of the army, such dispositions as Hagerstown we lay in line of battle from the 7th to the night of the 13th, when I moved my corps in the direction of the pontoon bridge at Falling Water. Being the rear guard of the army, such dispositions as were necessary were made to repel any advance of the enemy. Anderson's division crossed without molestation, and Pender's was in the act of crossing when the enemy made their appearance. A small body of cavalry charged Pettigrew's brigade, and were annihilated. Only two of our men were killed, but, unfortunately for the service, one of these was the gallant and accomplished Pettigrew. Subsequently the enemy pushed on vigorously, and I directed General Heth to retire his troops and cross th
Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.27
ions of the Third Army Corps during and subsequent to the battle of Gettysburg: On the morning of the 29th of June the Third Corps, composed of the divisions of Major-Generals Anderson, Heth and Pender, and five battalions of artillery, under command of Colonel R. L. Walker, was encamped on the road from Chambersburg to Gettysburg, near the village of Fayetteville. I was directed to move on this road in the direction of York, and to cross the Susquehanna, menacing the communications of Harrisburg with Philadelphia, and to co-operate with General Ewell, acting as circumstances might require. Accordingly, on the 29th I moved General Heth's division to Cashtown, some eight miles from Gettysburg, following on the morning of the 30th with the division of General Pender, and directing General Anderson to move in same direction on the morning of the 1st of July. On arriving at Cashtown, General Heth, who had sent forward Pettigrew's brigade to Gettysburg, reported that Pettigrew had enc
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 5.27
ed by Pender, with McIntosh's battalion of artillery--Colonel Walker, with the remainder of the artillery, being with Anderson. About three miles from Gettysburg, his advance brigade, Archer's, encountered the advance of the enemy. Archer and Davis were thrown into line, and, with some pieces of artillery from Pegram, the enemy were steadily driven back to the wooded hills this side of Gettysburg, where their principal force (since ascertained to be the 1st and 11th Corps) was disposed to dispute our further advance. Heth's whole division was now thrown into line: Davis on the left of the road; Archer, Pettigrew and Brokenbrough on the right, and Pender formed in his rear; Thomas on the left, and Lane, Scales and Perrin on the right. Pegram's and McIntosh's battalions of artillery were put in position on the crest of a hill overlooking the town of Gettysburg. Heth's division drove the enemy, encountering a determined resistance. About half-past 2 o'clock the right wing of Ewe
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