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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
Frederick, moves upon its belly, and I am not prepared to say that the jaunty bearing of Lee's men, as shrewdly out of beef at this time as ever were the English at Agincourt, was not due in a measure to the fact that just then their eyes were gladdened by droves of fat cattle sent them by an old comrade--Lieutenant-General Jubal Early, who, without the trifling formality of a commission from Governor Curtin, had assumed the duties of Acting Commissary-General of the rich Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Later (September 16th, 1864), Hampton made his brilliant cattle raid, in rear of the Army of Potomac, in which he inflicted considerable loss on the enemy in killed and wounded, and brought off above 800 prisoners and 2,500 beeves--Lee's Official Dispatch. We have seen that shortly after Grant's arrival in front of Petersburg, there was open to him a swarm of fair advantages, for his superb line of formidable redoubts, capable of assured defence by a fraction of his force, made it
Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
, moving rapidly through the breach, seize the crest of Cemetery Hill, a ridge four hundred yards in rear of the. Confederatered himself that the Confederates had no second line on Cemetery Hill, as he had formerly supposed and as Duane had positivel. Ledlie was to push through the breach straight to Cemetery Hill. Wilcox was to follow, and, after passing the breachro's Negro Division, should Ledlie effect a lodgment on Cemetery Hill, was to push beyond that point and immediately assault friendly shelter of its crumbling sides. Yonder lies Cemetery Hill in plain view, naked of men, Statement of Captain F.e barred the road to Petersburg; for, let me repeat, Cemetery Hill was naked of men. The officers of one battery, indeed, is true, in obedience to orders to advance straight for Cemetery Hill, had during this time attempted several charges from hiis moment that there was filing into the ravine between Cemetery Hill and the drunken battalions of Ferrero, a stern array of
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
in those last eventful days when its strength was well nigh too slender to support the weight of victory ; we have now to mark the conduct of its leader, not as when, the favored child of Mars, the clangor of his trumpets from the heights of Fredericksburg haughtily challenged the admiration of astonished nations, but in that severer glory which shines round about him as he stands at bay, girt with a handful of devoted soldiery, staying the arm of Fate with an incredible vigor of action and a c culminated in the surrender at Appomattox — a day which marked, indeed, the wreck of a nation, yet which may be recalled with no blush of shame by the men who there sadly furled those tattered colors emblazoned with the names of Manassas and Fredericksburg, of Chancellorsville and Cold Harbor — who there returned a park of blackened guns wrested from the victors at Gaines' Mill and Frazer's Farm, at Second Manassas and Harper's Ferry, at the Wilderness and Reams' Station, at Appomattox Courthou
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
ot forgetting the caution to you, however, that so far as concerns the conduct of affairs, and the numbers engaged, on the Confederate side, Mr. Swinton's narrative is a very fallacious guide. Once more, Mr. Stanton, who had long preserved silence, appeared to chronicle victory, and gold, which ever sympathizes with success, rose from 2.18 1/2 to 2.41--within ten days to 2.57. Nor shall we judge him harshly in this instance, for his bulletin was based upon the following dispatch: City Point, October 27, 9 P. M. I have just returned from the crossing of the Boydton Plank Road with Hatcher's creek. At every point the enemy was found entrenched and his works manned. No attack was made during the day further than to drive the pickets and cavalry inside the main works. Our casualties have been light — probably less than 200. The same is probably true of the enemy. [Later]--The attack on Hancock proves to be a decided success. We lost no prisoners except the usual straggle
Agincourt (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6.34
in order to see if this dreadful war cannot be ended in a mutually satisfactory treaty of peace. I have collected a great number of such excerpts from leading Northern and Western papers (1864), as being not without significance. Certainly no such utterances would have been tolerated In 1861-62. An army, says the great Frederick, moves upon its belly, and I am not prepared to say that the jaunty bearing of Lee's men, as shrewdly out of beef at this time as ever were the English at Agincourt, was not due in a measure to the fact that just then their eyes were gladdened by droves of fat cattle sent them by an old comrade--Lieutenant-General Jubal Early, who, without the trifling formality of a commission from Governor Curtin, had assumed the duties of Acting Commissary-General of the rich Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Later (September 16th, 1864), Hampton made his brilliant cattle raid, in rear of the Army of Potomac, in which he inflicted considerable loss on the enemy in k
Chesapeake City (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
rveless hands drooped over the spotless shields, and with imperious love claims a fealty no less devoted in these days of peace. I claim no vision of seer or prophet, yet I fancy that even now I descry the faint dawn of that day, which thousands wait on with expectant eyes; when all this land, still the fairest on the globe — this land, which has known so long what old Isaiah termed the dimness of anguish --shall grow glad again in the broad sunlight of prosperity, and from Alleghany to Chesapeake shall resound the hum and stir of busy life; when yonder noble roadstead, where our iron-clad Virginia revolutionized the naval tactics of two continents, shall be whitened by many a foreign sail, and you, her children, shall tunnel those grand and hoary mountains, whose every pass Lee and old Stonewall have made forever historic by matchless skill and daring. Thus, comrades, assured of her heroic Past, stirred by a great hope for her Future, may we to-night reecho the cry of Richmond on
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
., p. 92; General Hartranft, p. 190. If we except Elliott, who with the remnant of his brigade was occupying the ravine to the left and rear of the Crater, no officer of rank was present on the Confederate side to assume immediate direction of affairs, and a considerable time elapsed before Beauregard and Lee — both beyond the Appomattox — were informed by Colonel Paul, of Beauregard's staff, of the nature and locality of the disaster. But almost on the moment, John Haskell, of South Carolina, a glorious young battalionc-ommander, whose name will be forever associated with the artillery corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, galloped to the front, followed by two light batteries, and having disposed these pieces along the Plank Road, and opened Flanner's light guns from the Gee House, passed to his left to speak a word of cheery commendation to Lampkin of his battalion, who was already annoying the swarming masses of the enemy with his Virginia battery of eight-inch morta
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
horse, under W. H. F. Lee, boldly charging the enemy, drove them hotly past Malvern Hill, and on the same evening Lee received accurate information as to the whereabouts of his adversary. Lee's dispatch, 9 P. M., June 14th, 1864. But not a man of the Army of the Potomac had as yet crossed, and the conjuncture being now so nice that the slightest blunder would have been attended with irreparable disaster, he drew back his troops towards Chaffin's, dispatched Hoke early on the 15th from Drewry's Bluff to reinforce Beauregard, and stood ready to repel direct advance by the river routes or to throw his army into Petersburg, as events might dictate. Grant's design, as we now know, was to Seize Petersburg by a coup-de-main, and it had certainly succeeded but for an incredible negligence on his own part. Smith's command reached Bermuda Hundred, where Grant was in person, Grant and His Campaigns, p. 348. on the evening of the 14th, and being reinforced by Kautz's Division of Ca
Rapidan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
olitical party, whose silent clamors for substantial victory smote more sharply on his inner ear than did the piteous wail which rose from countless Northern homes for the 45,000 brave men whose bodies lay putrefying in the tangled Golgotha from Rapidan to North Anna — urged by these clamors, or else goaded into unreasoning fury by the patient readiness of his adversary, ordered up 16,000 of Butler's men from south of the James, and at break of day on June the 3d assaulted Lee's entire front — rious names high upon their country's roll with the point of their stainless swords. Nay, none of this is hers. Only the frosty stars to-night keep solemn watch and ward above the wind-swept graves of those who, from Potomac to James, from Rapidan to Appomattox, yielded up their lives that they might transmit to their children the heritage of their fathers. Weep on, Virginia, weep these lives given to thy cause in vain; The stalwart sons who ne'er shall heed thy trumpet-call again; The
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
ty of his powerful horse completely shrouded for the time the movement in his rear. Lee did not attack, for Early had been detached for the defence of Lynchburg, and the main body of his cavalry being absent under Hampton, he was compelled, like the Great Frederick, when Traun's Pandours enveloped Silesia in midnight, to read his position as if by flashes of lightning. On the next day, however, a small body of horse, under W. H. F. Lee, boldly charging the enemy, drove them hotly past Malvern Hill, and on the same evening Lee received accurate information as to the whereabouts of his adversary. Lee's dispatch, 9 P. M., June 14th, 1864. But not a man of the Army of the Potomac had as yet crossed, and the conjuncture being now so nice that the slightest blunder would have been attended with irreparable disaster, he drew back his troops towards Chaffin's, dispatched Hoke early on the 15th from Drewry's Bluff to reinforce Beauregard, and stood ready to repel direct advance by the ri
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