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The defence of Mobile in 1865. By General Dabney H. Maury. [We deem it a valuable service to the cause of historic truth to be able to present from time to time careful reviews of books about the war. And our readers will consider us fortunate in having secured the following review of General Andrews' book from the pen of the able soldier who made the gallant defence of Mobile against such overwhelming odds.] History of the campaign of Mobile. by brevet Major-General C. C. Andrews. D. Van Nostrand, publisher, &c. This is an octavo volume of more than 250 pages, prepared in 1865-6, and entirely devoted to the campaign of Mobile. The author manifests extreme pride in the success accomplished by the Federal army, in which he held high command. He has avowedly endeavored to set forth fairly the facts of the history he has undertaken to record, but has shown how difficult was the task when the passions of the recent strife were so fresh. The first and second chapters are
orities. Canby organized his forces in Mobile bay and at Pensacola. Two army corps rendezvoused on Fish river under the immediate command of Canby; another army corps assembled at Pensacola under General Steele. The whole expeditionary force against Mobile consisted of fifty thousand infantry, seven thousand cavalry, a very large train of field and siege artillery, a fleet of more than twenty men-of-war, and about fifty transports, mostly steamers. The preparations having commenced in December, the attack began on the 25th of March. My total effective force was seven thousand seven hundred excellent infantry and artillery, fifteen hundred cavalry, and about three hundred field and siege guns. A naval force of four small gunboats co-operated with my troops. The column under Canby marched from Fish river against the position of Spanish Fort. On March 25th information received through the advanced cavalry induced me to believe that the column from Fish river was not more tha
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 1.1
ersonal interest in the subject to embody in a form so permanent the events of a campaign so brief and so bootless — a campaign which was begun when scarce a hope was left of that independence for which we had fought four years and was ended after Lee's surrender at Appomattox had enshrowded in the pall of utter despair every heart that could feel a patriot's glow throughout all our stricken land. Because it was my honor to command that Confederate army at Mobile, and my privilege to share iopposed. No active pursuit was made. By General Taylor's orders, I moved the troops to Cuba station, refitted the transportation and field batteries, and made ready to march across and join General Joseph E. Johnston in Carolina. The tidings of Lee's surrender soon came, then of the capture of the President of the Confederacy. But under all these sad and depressing trials, the little army of Mobile remained steadfastly together, and in perfect order and discipline awaited the final issue of
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.1
ommand that Confederate army at Mobile, and my privilege to share its fortunes to the very end, it is my duty to record its story. I cannot do so more briefly than in the narrative I now reproduce, which was originally written by me soon after Mr. Davis, our late honored President, was released from arrest on account of his participation in the war of secession. He had entrusted me with the command of the Department of the Gulf and the defence of Mobile. I felt a soldier's natural desire t the last great battle which has yet been fought to uphold the rights of the States against the encroachments of the Federal power. Dabney H. Maury, Major-General late Confederate Army. New Orleans, Louisiana, December 25, 1871. To Hon. Jefferson Davis, Late President Southern Confederacy: My dear sir — I avail myself of your permission to narrate to you the history of the last great military operation between the troops of the Confederate States and the troops of the United States.
Dabney H. Maury (search for this): chapter 1.1
The defence of Mobile in 1865. By General Dabney H. Maury. [We deem it a valuable service to the cause of historic truth to be able to present from time to time careful reviews of books about the war. And our readers will consider us fortunate battle which has yet been fought to uphold the rights of the States against the encroachments of the Federal power. Dabney H. Maury, Major-General late Confederate Army. New Orleans, Louisiana, December 25, 1871. To Hon. Jefferson Davis, Latat those troops behaved to the last with so much courage and dignity. With highest respect, I remain truly yours, Dabney H. Maury, Major-General late Confederate Army, Prisoner of War on Parole. Remarks, etc. During the siege of Spanish Fo, and without despair of the future, let us to-morrow, with the dignity of the veterans who are the last to surrender, perform the sad duty which has been assigned to us. Your friend and comrade, Dabney H. Maury, Major-General Confederate Army.
D. Nostrand (search for this): chapter 1.1
e defence of Mobile in 1865. By General Dabney H. Maury. [We deem it a valuable service to the cause of historic truth to be able to present from time to time careful reviews of books about the war. And our readers will consider us fortunate in having secured the following review of General Andrews' book from the pen of the able soldier who made the gallant defence of Mobile against such overwhelming odds.] History of the campaign of Mobile. by brevet Major-General C. C. Andrews. D. Van Nostrand, publisher, &c. This is an octavo volume of more than 250 pages, prepared in 1865-6, and entirely devoted to the campaign of Mobile. The author manifests extreme pride in the success accomplished by the Federal army, in which he held high command. He has avowedly endeavored to set forth fairly the facts of the history he has undertaken to record, but has shown how difficult was the task when the passions of the recent strife were so fresh. The first and second chapters are dev
sent away from Mobile to Spanish Fort and Blakely. During the fighting on the eastern shore, the city of Mobile and all the works and forts immediately around it were garrisoned by scarce 3,000 artillerists! And by a bold dash, the place could have been carried any night during the operations against Spanish Fort. Page 48, the author is mistaken in saying we had Parrott guns in Spanish Fort. The only Parrott gun we had at that time about Mobile was a thirty-pounder Parrott, named Lady Richardson. We had captured her at Corinth in October, 1862, my Division Chief of Artillery, Colonel William E. Burnett, brought her off, and added her to our park of field artillery, and we had kept her ever since. Bat we had some cannon better than any Parrott had ever made. They were the Brooke guns, made at Selma in the Confederate, naval works, of the iron from Briarsfield, Alabama--the best iron for making cannon in the world. Our Brooke guns at Mobile were rifles, of 11-inch, 10-inc
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.1
nfederate force to oppose him. Soon after midday Canby marched in. Six thousand cavalry had been sent up the country from Pensacola to prevent my escape; but they could not get across the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers, which with their bottoms were flooded, and I reached Meridian with my army unopposed. No active pursuit was made. By General Taylor's orders, I moved the troops to Cuba station, refitted the transportation and field batteries, and made ready to march across and join General Joseph E. Johnston in Carolina. The tidings of Lee's surrender soon came, then of the capture of the President of the Confederacy. But under all these sad and depressing trials, the little army of Mobile remained steadfastly together, and in perfect order and discipline awaited the final issue of events. On the 8th of May we marched back to Meridian to surrender, and on the 13th of May we had completed the turning in of arms (to our own ordnance officers), and the last of us departed for his hom
icers who were with me throughout the whole of those trying times — friends who have always been true and soldiers who were tried by every test. Whatever efficiency attended the operations entrusted to my conduct throughout the war, was due to their intelligence, courage and devotion. Three of them sleep in their soldier's graves, and were in mercy spared the miseries of the subjugation against which they fought so nobly. John Maury, my Aide-de-Camp, gave up his young life at Vicksburg, in 1863; Columbus Jackson, Inspector-General, soon followed him, and William E. Burnett, Chief of Artillery, fell in Spanish Fort, and was almost the last officer killed during the war. D. W. Flowewee, Adjutant-General; John Gillespie, Ordnance Officer; Edmund Cummings, Inspector-General; Sylvester Nideleh, Surgeon; Dick Holland and John Mason, Aides-de-Camp, survived the dangers of those arduous campaigns, and are still manfully combatting the evils we fought together to avert from our people. T
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 1.1
United States. Immediately after the battle of Nashville, preparations were commenced for the reduction of Mobile. Two corps which had been sent to reinforce Thomas at Nashville were promptly returned to Canby in New Orleans, and the collection of material and transportation for a regular siege of Mobile commenced. General Tpanish Fort. The troops ordered for this service were the Missouri brigade of Cockrell, Gibson's Louisiana brigade, Ector's Texas and North Carolina brigade, and Thomas' brigade of Alabama boy-reserves, the third Missouri battery and Culpeper's battery. I felt confident then, and the light of experience justifies the confidence,Missourians, Elisha Gates commanding, the survivors of more than twenty battles, and the finest troops I have ever seen; the Alabama boy-reserve brigade under General Thomas, part of Holtzelaw's brigade, Barry's Mississippi brigade, the First Mississippi light artillery armed as infantry, several light batteries with about thirty-
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