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Defence of Fort Morgan--reports of General R. L. Page. [We are glad to be able to present the following original Ms. reports of General R. L. Page, which have neGeneral R. L. Page, which have never been in print, and which give a clear statement of the gallant defence of Fort Morgan. They would have appeared most appropriately in immediate connection with Godds before unknown to history. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. L. Page, Brigadier-General Commanding. New Orleans, La., 30th August, 1864. Major- was reported from the fleet, and communicated to this effect: Brigadier-General R. L. Page, Commanding Fort Morgan: Sir — To prevent the unnecessary sacrificethe Tennessee should be towed within range of my guns. Respectfully, &c., R. L. Page, Brigadier-General C. S. A. From this time to the 15th, day and night, wmptness and energy, and for his active and gallant assistance throughout the operations. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. L. Page, Brigadier-Genera
ile, Alabama: General — The report of the evacuation of Fort Powell and the surrender of Fort Gaines I had the honor of addressing you from Fort Morgan, on the 8th instant. It embraced the military operations to that date. After the reduction of Gaines, I felt confident that the whole naval and land force of the enemy would be brought against Morgan, and was assiduous in preparing my fort for as good a defence as possible. For the state of the work I beg leave to refer you to Chief Engineer Sheliha's letter to Headquarters' Department, of July 9th, from which time no material change or addition was made; and further to state, that it had been demonstrated by the fire from the enemy that the enceinte of the fort (in which was its main strength) protected the scarp of the main wall only about one-half its height from curbated shot; that it was now in the power of the enemy to open fire from every point of the compass, and consequently none of the casemates, without heavy traverse
truce. This was not done. Considering the great exposure to which the men were subjected, and the fact that shells frequently burst among them when in the casemates, the casualties were unusually small. I enclose a list. The garrison in this severe test behaved well, and I would make little distinction. Captain J. Gallimard, engineer in charge, performed his duties to my satisfaction. To the officers of the First Alabama battalion artillery, Major J. T. Gee commanding, and of Captain Cothran's company, Twenty-first Alabama, I give my thanks for their promptness and alacrity in every duty; and to Colonel A. J. Jackson, commanding First Tennessee, and Captains Johnston and Fisher and their brave companies of that regiment, for very efficient service. To Captain C. H. Smith, A. A. G., and Captain R. T. Thom, A. I. G., for prompt performance of all their duties, I am under obligations; and to my aide-de-camp, Lieutenant J. C. Taylor, I owe much for his promptness and energy,
rs leading, the wooden vessels, lashed together in twos, following; the sloops-of-war and larger craft on the inshore side protecting their consorts, which could convey them in should they be seriously damaged. The first monitor, Tecumseh, single turreted, was sunk under our guns, immediately abreast the fort. She went down rapidly; only a few, who were picked up by a boat from the enemy, and four who swam ashore and are now in our hands, were saved from her crew. The wooden gunboat Phillippi, attempting to pass the fort alone after the fleet, was sunk by the second shot, and being run ashore was deserted by her crew, and afterwards burnt by a boat from the Confederate States gunboat Morgan. One man was found on her, whose legs had been so shattered that he died while the officer was on board. He was thrown overboard. The spirit displayed by this garrison was fine, the guns admirably served, and all did their duty nobly; and though subjected to a fire which for the time wa
vent this disaster, I would especially mention Privates Murphy, Bembough and Stevens, First Tennessee regiment, for great courage and daring displayed. At daylight on the 23d (all my powder had then been destroyed), the citadel was again set on fire in several places by shells, and burned until it was consumed. The report made to me now was that the casemates which had been rendered as safe as possible for the men, some had been breached, others partially (Captains Johnston, Fisher and Hughes informed me that another shot on them would bring down the walls of their company quarters), so that a resumption of the severe fire from the enemy would in all likelihood inflict great loss of life, there being no bombproof in the fort. The enemy's approach was very near the glacis. My guns and powder had all been destroyed; my means of defence gone; the citadel, nearly the entire quartermaster store and a portion of the commissariat burnt by the enemy's shells. It was evident the fort c
enemy were likewise destroyed, as of no further avail in defence. Early in the night the woodwork of the citadel was fired by the mortar shells, and burned furiously for some hours; the enemy during the conflagration pouring in his missiles with increased vigor. With great efforts the fire was arrested, and prevented extending around near the magazines, which would have been in imminent danger of explosion. In the gallant endeavor to prevent this disaster, I would especially mention Privates Murphy, Bembough and Stevens, First Tennessee regiment, for great courage and daring displayed. At daylight on the 23d (all my powder had then been destroyed), the citadel was again set on fire in several places by shells, and burned until it was consumed. The report made to me now was that the casemates which had been rendered as safe as possible for the men, some had been breached, others partially (Captains Johnston, Fisher and Hughes informed me that another shot on them would bring
D. G. Farragut (search for this): chapter 1.5
organ: Sir — To prevent the unnecessary sacrifice of human life which must follow the opening of our batteries, we. demand the unconditional surrender of Fort Morgan and its dependencies. We are very respectfully, your obedient servants, D. G. Farragut, Rear Admiral. Gordon Granger, Major-General. To which my reply said: Rear Admiral D. G. Farragut, Gordon Granger, Major-General: Sirs — I am prepared to sacrifice life, and will only surrender when I have no means of defence. Rear Admiral D. G. Farragut, Gordon Granger, Major-General: Sirs — I am prepared to sacrifice life, and will only surrender when I have no means of defence. I do not understand that while being communicated with under flag of truce, the Tennessee should be towed within range of my guns. Respectfully, &c., R. L. Page, Brigadier-General C. S. A. From this time to the 15th, day and night, we were engaged by the fleet, sometimes in a brisk fight of several hours duration, at other in a desultory firing — without any very effective damage being done to our fort, save a demonstration of the fact that our brick walls were easily penetrable to th
1864. General D. H. Maury, Commanding, &c., Mobile: General — I have the honor to report that at 6 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's fleet, consisting of twenty-three men-of-war, of which four were monitors, moved up in line to pass this fort — the monitors leading, the wooden vessels, lashed together in twos, following; the sloops-of-war and larger craft on the inshore side protecting their consorts, which could convey them in should they be seriously damaged. The first monitor, Tecumseh, single turreted, was sunk under our guns, immediately abreast the fort. She went down rapidly; only a few, who were picked up by a boat from the enemy, and four who swam ashore and are now in our hands, were saved from her crew. The wooden gunboat Phillippi, attempting to pass the fort alone after the fleet, was sunk by the second shot, and being run ashore was deserted by her crew, and afterwards burnt by a boat from the Confederate States gunboat Morgan. One man was found on her, wh
Thaddeus Stevens (search for this): chapter 1.5
oyed, as of no further avail in defence. Early in the night the woodwork of the citadel was fired by the mortar shells, and burned furiously for some hours; the enemy during the conflagration pouring in his missiles with increased vigor. With great efforts the fire was arrested, and prevented extending around near the magazines, which would have been in imminent danger of explosion. In the gallant endeavor to prevent this disaster, I would especially mention Privates Murphy, Bembough and Stevens, First Tennessee regiment, for great courage and daring displayed. At daylight on the 23d (all my powder had then been destroyed), the citadel was again set on fire in several places by shells, and burned until it was consumed. The report made to me now was that the casemates which had been rendered as safe as possible for the men, some had been breached, others partially (Captains Johnston, Fisher and Hughes informed me that another shot on them would bring down the walls of their co
J. C. Taylor (search for this): chapter 1.5
when in the casemates, the casualties were unusually small. I enclose a list. The garrison in this severe test behaved well, and I would make little distinction. Captain J. Gallimard, engineer in charge, performed his duties to my satisfaction. To the officers of the First Alabama battalion artillery, Major J. T. Gee commanding, and of Captain Cothran's company, Twenty-first Alabama, I give my thanks for their promptness and alacrity in every duty; and to Colonel A. J. Jackson, commanding First Tennessee, and Captains Johnston and Fisher and their brave companies of that regiment, for very efficient service. To Captain C. H. Smith, A. A. G., and Captain R. T. Thom, A. I. G., for prompt performance of all their duties, I am under obligations; and to my aide-de-camp, Lieutenant J. C. Taylor, I owe much for his promptness and energy, and for his active and gallant assistance throughout the operations. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. L. Page, Brigadier-General.
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