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Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 2.12
y of Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania with a cavalry force of 1,800 and four pieces of horse artillery, under command of Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at 12 M., and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, where it camped izens who met the officer were notified that the place would be occupied, and if any resistance were made the place would be shelled in three minutes. Brigadier-General Wade Hampton's command, being in advance, took possession of the place, and I appointed him military governor of the city. No incidents occurred during the night, the command and their behavior towards the inhabitants is worthy of the highest praise; a few individual cases only were exceptions in this particular. Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels Lee, Jones, Wickham and Butler, and the officers and men under their command are entitled to my lasting gratitude for their coolness in dang
W. R. Butler (search for this): chapter 2.12
on this side. I lost not a man killed on the expedition, and only a few slight wounds. The enemy's loss is not known, but Pelham's one gun compelled the enemy's battery to change its position three times. The remainder of the march was destitute of interest. The conduct of the command and their behavior towards the inhabitants is worthy of the highest praise; a few individual cases only were exceptions in this particular. Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels Lee, Jones, Wickham and Butler, and the officers and men under their command are entitled to my lasting gratitude for their coolness in danger and cheerful obedience to orders. Unoffending persons were treated with civility, and the inhabitants were generous in proffers of provisions on the march. We seized and brought over a large number of horses, the property of citizens of the United States. The valuable information obtained in this reconnoissance as to the distribution of the enemy's force was communicated orally
W. H. F. Lee (search for this): chapter 2.12
1,800 and four pieces of horse artillery, under command of Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at 12 M., and marched thence to the virdered the charge, which was responded to in handsome style by the advance squadron (Irving's) of Lee's brigade, which drove back the enemy's cavalry upon the column of infantry advancing to occupy the crest from which the cavalry were driven. Quick as thought Lee's sharpshooters sprang to the ground, and engaging the infantry skirmishers, held them in check till the artillery in advance came u few individual cases only were exceptions in this particular. Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels Lee, Jones, Wickham and Butler, and the officers and men under their command are entitled to my lservant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General Commanding Cavalry. [The following letters from General Lee will be appropriate addenda to General Stuart's report.] headquarters Department of Northern
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 2.12
recent expedition into Pennsylvania, I enclose a copy of my letter to General Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, forwarding your report of the expedition. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, October 18, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: General — In forwarding the report of Major-General Stuart of his expedition into Pennsylvania, I take occasion tolvania, I take occasion to express to the Department my sense of the boldness, judgment and prudence he displayed in its execution, and cordially join with him in his commendation of the conduct and endurance of the brave men he commanded. To his skill and their fortitude, under the guidance of an overruling Providence, is their success due. I have the honor to be, most respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. Official: W. H. Taylor, Major and Aide-de-Camp
John B. Irving (search for this): chapter 2.12
bout Poolesville, and guarding the river fords. I started directly for Poolesville, but instead of marching upon that point I avoided it by a march through the woods, leaving it two or three miles to my left, and getting into the road from Poolesville to the mouth of the Monocacy. Guarding well my flanks and rear, I pushed boldly forward, meeting the head of the enemy's column going toward Poolesville. I ordered the charge, which was responded to in handsome style by the advance squadron (Irving's) of Lee's brigade, which drove back the enemy's cavalry upon the column of infantry advancing to occupy the crest from which the cavalry were driven. Quick as thought Lee's sharpshooters sprang to the ground, and engaging the infantry skirmishers, held them in check till the artillery in advance came up, which, under the gallant Pelham, drove back the enemy's force upon his batteries beyond the Monocacy, between which and our solitary gun quite a spirited fire continued for some time. Th
Samuel Jones (search for this): chapter 2.12
dition into Pennsylvania with a cavalry force of 1,800 and four pieces of horse artillery, under command of Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at 12 M., and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, where it camped for the night. At daylight next morning (Octothe hospital were paroled. During the day a large number of horses of citizens were seized and brought along. The wires were cut and railroad obstructed, and Colonel Jones' command was sent up the railroad toward Harrisburg to destroy a trestlework a few miles off. He however reported that it was constructed of iron, and he couldwards the inhabitants is worthy of the highest praise; a few individual cases only were exceptions in this particular. Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels Lee, Jones, Wickham and Butler, and the officers and men under their command are entitled to my lasting gratitude for their coolness in danger and cheerful obedience to order
R. H. Chilton (search for this): chapter 2.12
al J. E. B. Stuart's report of his cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania in October, 1862. [The following report, which we print from an original Ms. in General Stuart's own handwriting, does not appear in the Army of Northern Virginia reports, published by the Confederate Congress, and has, we believe, never been in print. Like everything from the great cavalry chieftain, it will attract attention and be read with interest.] headquarters cavalry division, October 14th, 1862. Colonel R. H. Chilton, A. A. General Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to report that on the 9th instant, in compliance with instructions from the Commanding General Army of Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania with a cavalry force of 1,800 and four pieces of horse artillery, under command of Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at 12 M., and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, w
hands of the enemy. I marched from Chambersburg to Leesburg (90 miles), with only an hour's halt, in thirty-six hours, including a forced passage of the Potomac — a march without a parallel in history. The results of this expedition in a moral and political point of view can hardly be estimated, and the consternation among property holders in Pennsylvania beggars description. I am specially indebted to Captain B. S. White (Confederate States cavalry), and to Messrs. Hugh Logan and Harbaugh, whose skillful guidance was of immense service to me. My staff are entitled to my thanks for untiring energy in the discharge of their duties. I enclose a map of the expedition drawn by Captain W. W. Blackford to accompany this report; also a copy of orders enforced during the march. Believing that the hand of God was clearly manifested in the signal deliverance of my command from danger, and the crowning success attending it, I ascribe to Him the praise, the honor and the glory. I
Walter H. Taylor (search for this): chapter 2.12
urself and your men in the recent expedition into Pennsylvania, I enclose a copy of my letter to General Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, forwarding your report of the expedition. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, October 18, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: General — In forwarding the report of Major-General Stuart of his expedition into Pennsylvania, I take occasion to express to the Department my sense of the boldness, judgment and prudence he displayed in its execution, and cordially join with him in his commendation of the conduct and endurance of the brave men he commanded. To his skill and their fortitude, under the guidance of an overruling Providence, is their success due. I have the honor to be, most respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. Official: W. H. Taylor, Major and Aide-de-Camp
be, most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General Commanding Cavalry. [The following letters from General Lee will be appropriate addenda to General Stuart's report.] headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, camp near Winchester, October 20, 1862. Major-General J. E. B. Stuart, Commanding Cavalry: General — To show my appreciation of the conduct of yourself and your men in the recent expedition into Pennsylvania, I enclose a copy of my letter to General Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, forwarding your report of the expedition. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, October 18, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: General — In forwarding the report of Major-General Stuart of his expedition into Pennsylvania, I take occasion to express to the Department my sense of the boldness, judgment and prudence he
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