hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Longstreet 388 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 252 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 248 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 176 6 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
S. D. Lee 154 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 138 0 Browse Search
Generals Longstreet 114 0 Browse Search
Plank (Pennsylvania, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
John B. Hood 88 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

Found 6,032 total hits in 1,852 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
the two, and that number should be added. We shall thus have-- Number for duty by report of 30th June99,475 Lockwood's and Stannard's brigades5,000 Addition to cavalry, say2,000 Brigade of regular batteries500   Total for duty106,975 Meade certainly had at least that number for duty at Gettysburg, though all of it might not be regarded as effective for a fight. His report, however, shows what was the actual force of infantry and artillery equipped and ready for the fight on the 30th, under the heading of Present for duty equipped. At the foot of the transcript, which is given on the regular printed form, is this printed note: Under the heading Present for duty equipped only those will be given who are actually available for the line of battle at the date of the regimental reports --that is, it includes none but line officers and men who actually go into the fight. For June 30th the number so present and equipped in the cavalry is. not given, but it is given in the retu
started he dragged his sick men behind the division; therefore these 243 must have become sick during the march, and, as this number is superior to the whole reduction, it will be admitted that the division had been somehow recruited after the 1st of June; but for the sake of simplicity, I shall take in the whole, both of the possible increase by the draft and the return of sick and wounded soldiers, and of the reduction by sickness, straggling and desertion, and consider only the difference bepassage: Through the operations of the draft the effective strength of each regiment had been increased after Chancellorsville. The regiments had received some recruits between the 15th and the 31st of May; some more came between the 10th and 1st of June. Von Borcke says that the regiments of cavalry were largely increased in that way, but I am not satisfied by such vague statements, and in order to prove the fact I propose to calculate the average strength of the regiments from the known str
e the elements for that comparison. On the 31st of May his division, which was the smallest but twthe last sentence: Effective force of Stuart, May 31st, 10,292+Jenkins' and Imboden's cavalry, 2,200ived some recruits between the 15th and the 31st of May; some more came between the 10th and 1st ofrison of the returns of my division for the 31st of May with that of the 20th of June, that there wire strength of my division for duty on the 31st of May, and deducting the 850, which he allows forand not embraced in the returns of May 20th and 31st, but had returned on the 3d of June, and was em count the officers present for duty on the 31st of May, shows that the total of officers and men p aggregate present in the whole army on the 31st of May, and there would be less than 70,000 as thegades, the increase in the cavalry from the 31st of May, and the brigade of regular batteries to tht by both Hooker and Meade. The return for May 31st showed 10,192 present for duty in Pleasonton'[19 more...]
28 and 131, and were printed from the originals in the Archive office. I have my own official returns for the entire year 1863, being the office copies which were retained, and the return for January 31st, 1863, shows that 52 joined my division by eion it was 160. So that the recruits by enlistment, during the whole period, from the 1st of January to the 1st of Agust, 1863, did not amount to half the loss by discharges and desertion, leaving that by death out of the question. Three of my brig went into that service, there were left 1,128,189 three years men for the army. On page 57 he says that in the summer of 1863, 956 volunteer regiments, 7 independent battalions, 61 independent companies, and 158 volunteer batteries were in the servntry, A. N. V., at battle of Gettysburg, by General J. A. Early. The infantry of the Army of Northern Virginia as it was reorganized just before the commencement of the Pennsylvania campaign of 1863 and as it remained up to the 1st of May, 1864.
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 1.2
rease, 1,000, leaving the effective force under Lee in Pennsylvania and Maryland the 1st of July ate Potomac; and he thinks to about 3,500. General Fitz. Lee thinks they were under 4,000 strong at tnquiry at the Adjutant-General's office, General Fitz. Lee will see that in the seven corps of the — it was assumed by and is to be placed on General Lee. That is what I have always thought, and the statement of Colonel Taylor that General Lee witnessed the flight of the Federals through Gettyshe applied for and obtained permission from General Lee to attack while Rodes was engaged; and of Gordering a general advance, and it rests on General Lee, according to General Fitz. Lee's own admisGeneral Fitz. Lee's own admission. General Lee's fame can stand the ordeal of all the criticisms of all those who were not presGeneral Lee's fame can stand the ordeal of all the criticisms of all those who were not present, and can therefore form no just estimate of the obstacles to an advance on our part that presenor form any estimate of his strength, while General Lee had a much better view from Seminary ridge,[5 more...]
April 30th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.2
Virginia that was available for the approaching movement. If any raw recruits had been received after that time, they would have been worthless from the want of training and seasoning of the men as well as of their horses. There is a very great misapprehension existing in the minds of persons outside of the Confederacy, and even among officers of the Confederate army, as to the number of men put into the army under the conscript law. In a report to the Secretary of War, dated the 30th of April, 1864, General John S. Preston, Superintendent of the Bureau of Conscription, says: The results indicate this grave consideration for the government — that fresh material for the armies can no longer be estimated as an element of future calculation for their increase; and that necessity demands the invention of devices for keeping in the ranks the men now borne on the rolls. In a report made in February, 1865, General Preston gives a table showing the number of conscripts enrolled and ass
3 officers and men present for duty; on the 20th of June (see Southern Magazine, September, 1872, pavision for the 31st of May with that of the 20th of June, that there was a loss of only 293, after dttalion was detached permanently before the 20th of June and is not embraced in the return of that dade to them between the 31st of May and the 20th of June. They jointly numbered 4,016 for duty on the 31st of May, and 3,447 on the 20th of June, showing a loss of 569, of which 163 was for loss in aies in battle. My aggregate present on the 20th of June was 6,476, and on the 10th of July it was 4nd a half per cent. in my division from the 20th of June to the beginning of the battle, and that thfteen per cent. from the 31st of May to the 20th of June, and after that near eight per cent. Deductfficers.Men.Officers.Men.Officers.Men. 1862--June 204,665101,16049610,54144320117,226 Now, wis only necessary to compare the returns of June the 20th and 30th together. At the former date, th[8 more...]
atio of decrease in the rest of our infantry-during the same period. To show the likelihood of there being at least as much loss in Longstreet's and Hill's corps as in Ewell's, I quote from General Kershaw's report the following statement: Tuesday, June 16th, the brigade marched to Sperryville; 17th, to Mud run in Fauquier county. These two days were excessively hot, and on the 17th many cases of sunstroke occurred. General Hill started from the heights of Fredericksburg on the 15th, I believns and absence of the officer who could replace them), included as gain in this report. Hooker in his testimony (page 162) says that, at Fairfax Courthouse, Stahl's cavalry, numbering 6,100 sabres, was added to his cavalry — which was about the 16th or 17th of June. As the cavalry for duty on the 31st of May numbered 10,192, the addition of Stahl's increased it to over 16,000, from which are to be deducted the losses in action, &c.; but as the return for July 10th showed 11,842 for duty in
emark: Taken from last return received, May 31st, 1863. Opposite the artillery in the return for July 10th is this note: Brigade of regular batteries, aggregate 595, omitted in last report of June 30 (on account of loss of previous returns and absence of the officer who could replace them), included as gain in this report. Hooker in his testimony (page 162) says that, at Fairfax Courthouse, Stahl's cavalry, numbering 6,100 sabres, was added to his cavalry — which was about the 16th or 17th of June. As the cavalry for duty on the 31st of May numbered 10,192, the addition of Stahl's increased it to over 16,000, from which are to be deducted the losses in action, &c.; but as the return for July 10th showed 11,842 for duty in that arm at that date, it must have numbered considerably more than 12,000 for duty at Gettysburg. The brigade of regular batteries, out of an aggregate of 595, must have numbered at least 500 for duty according to the ratio in the other artillery, and that ou
January 1st (search for this): chapter 1.2
le portion being in battle, and by discharges and desertions, 327 for the same period, making a total loss of 754. The next monthly return was for July 31st, and that shows 77 received by enlistment during the months of June and July, they being received after the return from the Gettysburg campaign, and the loss by death for the same period was 344, being mostly in battle, and by discharges and desertion it was 160. So that the recruits by enlistment, during the whole period, from the 1st of January to the 1st of Agust, 1863, did not amount to half the loss by discharges and desertion, leaving that by death out of the question. Three of my brigades were from Virginia, North Carolina and Georgia, the States from which conscripts for the Army of Northern Virginia were principally received. My returns show that very nearly the whole of the recruits received in the division were from those States, the greater number being from North Carolina. So if recruits were received to any exten
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...