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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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, an excess of 1,498 above the number actually present. Taking off 919, the strength of the regiments detatched, and the other sixteen had 6,024, giving them an average of 376, which, being multiplied by 169, gives 63,544, an excess of 4,087 above the number actually present, and by 167 gives 62,792, an excess of 3,335 above the number actually present. One of my regiments, the Thirty-first Virginia, was absent and not embraced in the returns of May 20th and 31st, but had returned on the 3d of June, and was embraced in the returns of June the 10th and 20th; so I had only seventeen regiments at Gettysburg, instead of eighteen as the Comte supposes. The strength of the Thirty-first Virginia in present for duty, on the 20th of June, was 280. Adding the strength of this regiment to that of the sixteen present on the 31st of May, and counting the seventeen as eighteen, and the average thus obtained would be about that of the regiments for the whole army. I had a small battalion of two
May 1st, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.2
Cemetery hill, and all our movements could be seen, when we commenced ascending that hill, Buford with his 2,500 cavalry might have swept around the town on our right, released the several thousand prisoners we had taken, and destroyed our trains, as there would have been nothing in our rear to oppose him. When Johnson arrived, which was after six P. M., the opportunity for taking the heights without a desperate and uncertain struggle had passed, as Generel Hancock's statement makes very apparent. Those who are still disposed to carp at the operations of the first day, can turn their batteries on General Lee, if they think proper; but it is very easy to imagine what would be his reply if he were alive. J. A. Early. Roster of infantry, A. N. V., at battle of Gettysburg, by General J. A. Early. The infantry of the Army of Northern Virginia as it was reorganized just before the commencement of the Pennsylvania campaign of 1863 and as it remained up to the 1st of May, 1864.
J. B. Kershaw (search for this): chapter 1.2
In fact a return made on the 8th showed 261 less for duty, and 408 less in the aggregate present on that day than on the 10th. I may assume-therefore, that there was a loss of five and a half per cent. in my division from the 20th of June to the beginning of the battle, and that there was the same ratio of decrease in the rest of our infantry-during the same period. To show the likelihood of there being at least as much loss in Longstreet's and Hill's corps as in Ewell's, I quote from General Kershaw's report the following statement: Tuesday, June 16th, the brigade marched to Sperryville; 17th, to Mud run in Fauquier county. These two days were excessively hot, and on the 17th many cases of sunstroke occurred. General Hill started from the heights of Fredericksburg on the 15th, I believe, and his march had to be rapid to join Longstreet's corps, and hence the probability is that the loss in his corps exceeded the ratio in my division. Take as the full strength of the infantry,
igades were--first, Pettigrew's, nearly 4,000 men strong (before leaving in Virginia one of its five regiments); second, Jenkins' cavalry, and third, Imboden's mixed command, numbering together more than 2,500 men. On the other hand the effectives and fill our ranks, is to be entirely discarded; the only real additions made to the army were the cavalry brigades of Jenkins and Imboden. My own division was certainly as good a one as any in that army, and having been trained under Stonewallong at the battle. This loss was not unreasonable, as will be seen when we come to notice that in the Federal cavalry. Jenkins' brigade, which was not embraced in the returns of May 31st, was about 1,600 strong before it crossed the Potomac, and Wt of May. Some therefore must have rejoined the army by the former date, and very probably some that had been left with Jenkins' brigade near Suffolk had come back. We had 252 pieces with the infantry, as shown by a statement furnished me by Gener
M. D. Corse (search for this): chapter 1.2
mbering together more than 2,500 men. On the other hand the effective strength of the army was reduced by the three following causes: first, detachments; second, losses in fights; third, sickness, straggling and desertion. First, detachments: Corse's brigade of Pickett's division and one regiment of Pettigrew's brigade (about 800 strong) were sent to Hanover Junction (Virginia), and later Early left one regiment to escort the prisoners from Winchester, and two others to occupy that town. Tttalion, which belonged to Jones' brigade, did not exceed 200. 6,000, therefore, will cover all the cavalry we had available for the battle. The artillery numbered 4,702 on the 31st of May, and some of it was very evidently left in Virginia with Corse's brigade, as the return for July 20th shows more present for duty in the artillery at that date than on the 31st of May. Some therefore must have rejoined the army by the former date, and very probably some that had been left with Jenkins' brig
Harry T. Hays (search for this): chapter 1.2
f June, 280, which, being added to the 293 assumed by the Comte to be my total loss, makes a loss of 573 in the portion of the division included in both returns, being very nearly nine and a half per cent. As there were no detachments made from Hays' and Gordon's brigades, and no additions to either, I have taken those two brigades to ascertain the ratio of decrease, in the absence of the return of the Thirty-first Virginia for the 31st of May, and of the three detached regiments and battalioll enured to marching and the hardships of an active campaign as any. Whatever ratio of decrease, therefore, occurred in that division may safely be assumed as the ratio of decrease for the whole infantry of the army. No troops were detached from Hays' and Gordon's brigades, and no additions were made to them between the 31st of May and the 20th of June. They jointly numbered 4,016 for duty on the 31st of May, and 3,447 on the 20th of June, showing a loss of 569, of which 163 was for loss in a
R. S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 1.2
rer marching before crossing the Potomac, than my division or any other part of Ewell's corps had done. The weather was also more sultry during the period of their ood of there being at least as much loss in Longstreet's and Hill's corps as in Ewell's, I quote from General Kershaw's report the following statement: Tuesday, Juneat of course, after the arrival of his chief, all responsibility was taken from Ewell in not ordering the troops forward — it was assumed by and is to be placed on Gt began to fall back, settles the question of his presence beyond all dispute. Ewell is therefore relieved from the responsibility for not ordering a general advancan advance on our part that presented themselves on the occasion. The order to Ewell contemplated the use of only his own troops then at hand, to carry the hill, ifter view from Seminary ridge, and he ordered none of Hill's troops to advance. Ewell could not do so when the Commanding-General was present. If he had gone forwar
A. A. Humphreys (search for this): chapter 1.2
ntroversy.] Letter from the count of Paris. Chateau D'Eu, Seine Inferieure, March 23d, 1878. Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society: With the permission of the Adjutant-General of the United States army, General Humphreys has kindly furnished me with a complete and authentic copy of the monthly return of the Army of Northern Virginia for the 31st of May, 1863. The inspection of that document settles at once the difficulties which I met with in the evaluation of the effective strength of Lee's army at Gettysburg, and which I had submitted to you. It explains the difference between Colonel Taylor's figures — which embraced only the enlisted men present for duty — and that given by General Humphreys, which comprises both officers and men present for duty. As the Federal reports always reckon the officers with the men, whenever a comparison is to be made between the forces of both armies it is the latter system which should be adopted. An error of
while General Lee had a much better view from Seminary ridge, and he ordered none of Hill's troops to advance. Ewell could not do so when the Commanding-General was present. If he had gone forward with his less than 8,000 men that were available before the arrival of Johnson, he could not have shattered the Twelfth corps--possibly portions of two others; and as our position was perfectly in view from Cemetery hill, and all our movements could be seen, when we commenced ascending that hill, Buford with his 2,500 cavalry might have swept around the town on our right, released the several thousand prisoners we had taken, and destroyed our trains, as there would have been nothing in our rear to oppose him. When Johnson arrived, which was after six P. M., the opportunity for taking the heights without a desperate and uncertain struggle had passed, as Generel Hancock's statement makes very apparent. Those who are still disposed to carp at the operations of the first day, can turn the
March 17th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.2
refill it often. Add the 72,292 volunteers, and it would give only 154,285 men that were available for recruiting all the Confederate armies east of the Mississippi river, after the 16th of April, 1862, up to February, 1865. Let us see how it was on the other side. The Comte seems to be unaware of the fact that, on the third day of March, 1863, an act of the United States Congress was approved, which provides for conscription, though generally designated the Enrolment act. On the 17th of March, 1863, the Bureau for Enrolment and Conscription was organized under Brigadier-General James B. Fry as Provost-Marshal General (see his report, page 13), and on the 1st of May, 1863, an order was issued giving it the superintendence of the entire volunteer recruiting system (same page): After the 3d of March there were no more calls on the States except for emergency men. The Provost-Marshal General, in his report (page 2), says: One million one hundred and twenty thousand six hundred a
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