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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Bentonville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
the 4th of March moved with the divisions of Price and McCulloch, by way of Fayetteville and Bentonville, to attack the enemy's main camp on Sugar creek. The whole force under my command was about sixteen thousand men. On the 6th we left Elm Spring for Bentonville, and from prisoners captured by our scouting parties on the 5th I became convinced that up to that time no suspicion was entertaoints in the surrounding country could rejoin the main body. I therefore endeavored to reach Bentonville, eleven miles distant, by a rapid march, but the troops moved so very slowly that it was 11 Ach was admirably handled, until we had gained a point on Sugar creek about seven miles beyond Bentonville and within one or two miles of the strongly entrenched camp of the enemy. In conference winance supplies could not find his wagons, which, with the subsistence train, had been sent to Bentonville. Most of the troops had been without any food since the morning of the 6th, and the artiller
Fayetteville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
d advance, I resolved to attack him at once. Accordingly, I sent for General Pike to join me near Elm Springs with the forces under his command, and on the morning of the 4th of March moved with the divisions of Price and McCulloch, by way of Fayetteville and Bentonville, to attack the enemy's main camp on Sugar creek. The whole force under my command was about sixteen thousand men. On the 6th we left Elm Spring for Bentonville, and from prisoners captured by our scouting parties on the 5thd camp of the enemy. In conference with Generals McCulloch and McIntosh, who had an accurate knowledge of this locality, I had ascertained that by making a detour of eight miles, I could reach the Telegraph road, leading from Springfield to Fayetteville, and be immediately in rear of the enemy and his entrenchments. I had resolved to adopt this route, and therefore halted the head of my column near the point where the road by which I proposed to move diverges, threw out my pickets, and biv
Leetown (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
e command of the combined forces of Price and McCulloch. I reached their headquarters on the 3d of March, and being satisfied that the enemy, who had halted on Sugar creek, fifty-five miles distant, was only awaiting large reinforcements before he would advance, I resolved to attack him at once. Accordingly, I sent for General Pid on the morning of the 4th of March moved with the divisions of Price and McCulloch, by way of Fayetteville and Bentonville, to attack the enemy's main camp on Sugar creek. The whole force under my command was about sixteen thousand men. On the 6th we left Elm Spring for Bentonville, and from prisoners captured by our scoutingnly have beaten the enemy next day. We followed him, our advance skirmishing with his rear guard, which was admirably handled, until we had gained a point on Sugar creek about seven miles beyond Bentonville and within one or two miles of the strongly entrenched camp of the enemy. In conference with Generals McCulloch and McIn
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
o'clock the cannonading was as heavy as that of the previous day. On the side of the enemy the fire was much better sustained; for being freed from the attack of my right wing, he could now concentrate his whole artillery force. Finding that my right wing was much disorganized, and that the batteries were one after the other retiring from the field with every shot expended, I resolved to withdraw the army, and at once placed the ambulances with all of the wounded they would bear upon the Huntsville road, and a portion of McCulloch's division, which had joined me during the night, in position to follow, while I so disposed of my remaining forces as best to deceive the enemy as to my intention, and to hold him in check while executing it. About 10 o'clock I gave the order for the column to march, and soon afterwards for the troops engaged to fall back and cover the rear of the army. This was done very steadily — no attempt was made by the enemy to follow us, and we encamped about 3
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
nel Maury was of invaluable service to me, both in preparing for and during the battle. Here, as on other battle fields where I have served with him, he proved to be a zealous patriot, and true soldier, cool and calm under all circumstances, he was always ready either with his sword or his pen. His services and Lieutenant Sullivane's are distinguished. The latter had his horse killed under him whilst leading a charge, the order for which he had delivered. You will perceive from this report, General, that though I did not, as I hoped, capture or destroy the enemy's army in Western Arkansas, I have inflicted upon it a heavy blow, and compelled him to fall back into Missouri. This he did on the 16th instant. For further details concerning the action, and for more particular notices of the troops engaged, I respectfully refer you to the reports of the subordinate officers, which accompany this report. Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, Earl Van Dorn, Major-General.
Telegraph (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
in one or two miles of the strongly entrenched camp of the enemy. In conference with Generals McCulloch and McIntosh, who had an accurate knowledge of this locality, I had ascertained that by making a detour of eight miles, I could reach the Telegraph road, leading from Springfield to Fayetteville, and be immediately in rear of the enemy and his entrenchments. I had resolved to adopt this route, and therefore halted the head of my column near the point where the road by which I proposed ted again, moving with Price's division in advance, and taking the road by which I hoped before daylight to reach the rear of the enemy. Some obstructions, which he had hastily thrown in the way, so impeded our march, that we did not gain the Telegraph road until near 10 o'clock A. M. of the 7th. From prisoners with forage wagons whom our cavalry pickets brought in, we were assured that we were not expected in that quarter, and that the promise was fair for a complete surprise. I at onc
Elm Springs (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
ion with the division of General McCulloch in Boston mountains. For reasons which seemed to me imperative, I resolved to go in person and take command of the combined forces of Price and McCulloch. I reached their headquarters on the 3d of March, and being satisfied that the enemy, who had halted on Sugar creek, fifty-five miles distant, was only awaiting large reinforcements before he would advance, I resolved to attack him at once. Accordingly, I sent for General Pike to join me near Elm Springs with the forces under his command, and on the morning of the 4th of March moved with the divisions of Price and McCulloch, by way of Fayetteville and Bentonville, to attack the enemy's main camp on Sugar creek. The whole force under my command was about sixteen thousand men. On the 6th we left Elm Spring for Bentonville, and from prisoners captured by our scouting parties on the 5th I became convinced that up to that time no suspicion was entertained of our advance, and that there wer
Boston Mountains (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
onfederate reports, and which, so far as we know, has never been in print in any form.] headquarters Trans-Mississippi District, Jacksonport, Ark., March 27, 1862. General Braxton Bragg: General — I have the honor to report that while at Pocahontas I received dispatches on the 22d February, informing me that General Price had rapidly fallen back from Springfield before a superior force of the enemy, and was endeavoring to form a junction with the division of General McCulloch in Boston mountains. For reasons which seemed to me imperative, I resolved to go in person and take command of the combined forces of Price and McCulloch. I reached their headquarters on the 3d of March, and being satisfied that the enemy, who had halted on Sugar creek, fifty-five miles distant, was only awaiting large reinforcements before he would advance, I resolved to attack him at once. Accordingly, I sent for General Pike to join me near Elm Springs with the forces under his command, and on the mo
Boston Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
ion, but would neither retire from the field nor cease to expose himself to danger. No successes can repair the loss of the gallant dead who fell on this well-fought field. McCulloch was the first to fall. I had found him, in the frequent conferences I had with him, a sagacious, prudent counsellor, and a bolder soldier never died for his country. McIntosh had been very much distinguished all through the operations which have taken place in this region; and during my advance from Boston mountain I placed him in command of the cavalry brigade and in charge of the pickets. He was alert, daring and devoted to his duty. His kindness of disposition with his reckless bravery had attached the troops strongly to him; so that after McCulloch fell, had he remained to lead them, all would have been well with my right wing. But after leading a brilliant charge of cavalry and carrying the enemy's battery, he rushed into the thick of the fight again at the head of his old regiment, and wa
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
ssippi District, Jacksonport, Ark., March 27, 1862. General Braxton Bragg: General — I have the honor to report that while at Pocahontas I received dispatches on the 22d February, informing me that General Price had rapidly fallen back from Springfield before a superior force of the enemy, and was endeavoring to form a junction with the division of General McCulloch in Boston mountains. For reasons which seemed to me imperative, I resolved to go in person and take command of the combined foongly entrenched camp of the enemy. In conference with Generals McCulloch and McIntosh, who had an accurate knowledge of this locality, I had ascertained that by making a detour of eight miles, I could reach the Telegraph road, leading from Springfield to Fayetteville, and be immediately in rear of the enemy and his entrenchments. I had resolved to adopt this route, and therefore halted the head of my column near the point where the road by which I proposed to move diverges, threw out my
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