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was again in motion. What strange sensations the men had as they marched slowly across the High bridge. They knew its great height, but the night was so dark that they could not see the abyss on either side. Arrived on the other side, the wornout soldiers fell to the ground and slept, more dead than alive. Some had slept as they marched across the bridge, and declared that they had no distinct recollection of when they left it, or how long they were upon it. Early on the morning of the 7th, the march was resumed and continued through Farmville, across the bridge and to Cumberland heights, overlooking the town. Here, on the bare hillside, a line of battle was formed, for what purpose the men did not know — the Howitzers occupying a central place in the line, and standing with their feet in the midst of a number of the graves of soldiers who had perished in the hospitals in the town. While standing thus in line a detail was sent into the town to hunt up some rations. They fo
med, the roll was called and the battalion marched slowly and solemnly away. No one doubted that the command would march at once to the assistance of the troops at or near Five Forks. It was thought that before morning every man would have his musket and his supply of ammunition, and the crack of day would see the battalion rushing into battle in regular infantry style, whooping and yelling like demons. But they got no arms that night. The march was steady till broad day of Monday the 3d of April. Of course the men felt mortified at having to leave the guns, but there was no help for it, as the battery horses which had been sent away to winter had not returned. It was evident that the battalion had bid farewell to artillery and commenced a new career as infantry. As the night wore on the men learned that the command was not going to any point on the lines. That being determined, no one could guess its destination. Later in the night, probably as day approached, the sky in t
on boards were knocked out of a limber chest, the dough was spread on them and held near the fire till partially cooked. Then, with what delight, it was devoured! At daybreak Saturday the march was resumed and continued almost without interruption during the whole day — the men,those whose gums and teeth were not already too sore, crunching parched corn and raw bacon as they trudged along. Saturday night the battalion rested near Appomattox Courthouse in a pine woods. Sunday morning, April 9th, after a short march, the column entered the village of Appomattox Courthouse, marching by what seemed to be the main road. Several dead men, dressed in the uniform of United States regular artillery, were lying on the roadside, their faces turned up to the blaze of the sun. One had a ghastly wound in the breast, which must have been made by grape or canister. On through the village without halting marched the column. Whitworth shots went hurtling through the air every few minutes, in
May 12th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 5.28
soldier life. By Private Carlton McCarthy. Paper no. 5--improvised infantry — to Appomattox Courthouse. Sunday, April 2d, 1865, found Cutshaw's battalion of artillery occupying the earthworks at Fort Clifton, on the Appomattox, about two miles below Petersburg, Virginia. The command was composed of the Second company Richmond Howitzers, Captain Lorraine F. Jones, Garber's battery, Fry's battery and remnants of five other batteries (saved from the battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, May 12, 1864), and had present for duty nearly five hundred men, with a total muster roll, including the men in prison, of one thousand and eighty. The place — the old Clifton house --was well fortified, and had the additional protection of the river along the entire front of perhaps a mile. The works extended from the Appomattox on the right to Swift creek on the left. There were some guns of heavy calibre, mounted and ready for action, and in addition to these some field-pieces disposed along t
April 2nd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 5.28
Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. By Private Carlton McCarthy. Paper no. 5--improvised infantry — to Appomattox Courthouse. Sunday, April 2d, 1865, found Cutshaw's battalion of artillery occupying the earthworks at Fort Clifton, on the Appomattox, about two miles below Petersburg, Virginia. The command was composed of the Second company Richmond Howitzers, Captain Lorraine F. Jones, Garber's battery, Fry's battery and remnants of five other batteries (saved from the battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, May 12, 1864), and had present for duty nearly five hundred men, with a total muster roll, including the men in prison, of one thousand and eighty. The place — the old Clifton house --was well fortified, and had the additional protection of the river along the entire front of perhaps a mile. The works extended from the Appomattox on the right to Swift creek on the left. There were some guns of heavy calibre, mounted and ready for action, and in addition to these some field-p
April 10th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 5.28
h respected by all picket officers, patrols, &c., of the Federal army as though they bore the signature of U. S. Grant. The following is a copy of one of these paroles, recently made from the original: Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia, April 10th, 1865 The bearer, Private----------,of Second company Howitzers, Cutshaw's battalion, a paroled prisoner of the Army of Northern Virginia, has permission to go to his home and there remain undisturbed. L. F. Jones, Captain Commanding Second Cotions. Captain Fry, who commanded after Colonel Cutshaw was wounded, assembled the battalion, thanked the men for their faithfulness, bid them farewell, and read the following: headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, Appomattox Courthouse, April 10th, 1865. General order no. 9. After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the brave survivo
Old Henry Carter (search for this): chapter 5.28
ers; but help was coming! A cloud of dust was approaching from the rear of the column. All eyes were strained to see what it might mean. Presently the artillerymen recognized the well known sound. A battery was coming in full gallop, the drivers lashing their horses, and yelling like madmen. The guns bounded along as though they would outrun the horses, and with rush, roar and rattle they approached the front of the battalion. Some fellow in the Second company Howitzers sung out Old Henry Carter!!! Hurah! for the Third company!! Give it to 'em, boys!! It was indeed the Third company of Howitzers, long separated from the Second, with their gallant captain at their head! Not a moment was lost. The guns were in battery, and the smoke of the first shot was curling about the heads of the men in the column in marvelously quick time. Friends and comrades in the column called to the men at the guns, and they, as they stepped in and out, responded with cheerful, ringing voices: H
Courthouse. Sunday, April 2d, 1865, found Cutshaw's battalion of artillery occupying the earthw were issued a line of battle was formed with Cutshaw on the right. For what purpose the line was regiments broke and fled in wild confusion. Cutshaw's men stood up, seized their muskets and stoole, the column was formed in line of battle — Cutshaw's battalion near the road and in an old fieldrately as though practicing at a mark. Colonel Cutshaw received a wound which so shattered his lion of Curdsville. It was on this march that Cutshaw's battalion showed itself proof against the ded, and the stampeded troops came rushing by. Cutshaw's battalion stood firmly and quietly, as if oSo many muskets were dropped on the road that Cutshaw's unarmed squad armed itself with abandoned mneral Walker addressed his division, to which Cutshaw's battalion was attached, bidding them fareweations. Captain Fry, who commanded after Colonel Cutshaw was wounded, assembled the battalion, tha[5 more...]
ere panic striken, all efforts to rally them were vain, and the enemy was almost upon the column. General Gordon ordered General Walker to form his division and drive the enemy back from the road. The division advanced gallantly, and conspicuous in the charge was Cutshaw's battalion. When the line was formed, the battalion occupied rising ground on the right. The line was visible for a considerable distance. In rear of the battalion there was a group of unarmed men under command of Sergeant Ellett, of the Howitzers. In the distribution of muskets at Amelia Courthouse the supply fell short of the demand and this squad had made the trip so far unarmed. Some, too, had been compelled to ground their arms at Sailor's creek. A few yards to the left and rear of the battalion, in the road, was General Lee, surrounded by a number of officers, gazing eagerly about him. An occasional musket ball whistled over, but there was no enemy in sight. In the midst of this quiet a general officer
Second company Richmond Howitzers, Captain Lorraine F. Jones, Garber's battery, Fry's battery and remnants of five other batteries (saved from the battle of Spotsylof the Second company of Richmond Howitzers, and twenty men each from Garber and Fry, under the command of Lieutenant Henry Jones, were left behind the fence-rail woere on the right of the Howitzers, on the opposite side of the road, in a field; Fry's men on the extreme left. To cross the road dividing the line was a hazardous some sort, and commenced shouting, Fall in Howitzers!! This way Garber's men!! Fry's battery!! Fall in!! Cutshaw's battalion fall in here!! Thus of their own acelay, a detail for skirmish duty was ordered. Captain Jones detailed four men,--Fry and Garber the same number. Lieutenant McRae was placed in command. The infanted silk are still preserved, and will be handed down to future generations. Captain Fry, who commanded after Colonel Cutshaw was wounded, assembled the battalion, t
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