hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Longstreet 388 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 252 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 248 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 176 6 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
S. D. Lee 154 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 138 0 Browse Search
Generals Longstreet 114 0 Browse Search
Plank (Pennsylvania, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
John B. Hood 88 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 294 total hits in 119 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
to within three miles of Carlisle. From Greencastle, Steuart's brigade was ordered to McConnellsburg to collect horses, cattle and other supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my division to Greenville, thence eastwardly by way of Scotland to Gettysburg — not arriving in time, however, to participate in the action of the 1st instant. The last day's march was twenty-five miles, rendered the more fatiguing because of obstruction caused by wagons of Longstreet's corps. Late on the night of July 1st I moved along the G. & Y. railroad to the northeast of the town and formed line of battle in a ravine in an open field — Nicholls' brigade on the right, next Jones', Steuart's and Walker's on the left; pickets were thrown well to the front, and the troops slept on their arms. Early next morning skirmishers from Walke
h orders, I withdrew to the hill north and west of Gettysburg, where we remained until the following day in the hope that the enemy would give us battle on ground of our own selection. My loss in this terrible battle was heavy, including some of the most valuable officers of the command. Major J. W. Latimer of Andrews' battalion, the boy major, whose chivalrous bearing on so many fields had won for him a reputation to be envied by his seniors,--received a severe wound on the evening of the 2d, from the effects of which he has since died. Major B. W. Leigh, my Chief of Staff, whose concientious discharge of duty, superior attainments and noble bearing made him invaluable to me, was killed within a short distance of the enemy's line. Major H. K. Douglas, Assistant Adjutant-General, was severely wounded while in the discharge of his duties, and is still a prisoner. My orderly, W. H. Webb, remained with me after being severely wounded. His conduct entitles him to a commission.
enemy were too securely entrenched and in too great number to be dislodged by the force at my command. In the meantime, a demonstration in force was made upon my left and rear. The Second Virginia regiment, Stonewall brigade and Smith's brigade of Early's division were disposed to meet and check it, which was accomplished to my entire satisfaction. No further assualt was made; all had been done that it was possible to do. I held my original position until ten o'clock of the night of the 3d, when, in accordance with orders, I withdrew to the hill north and west of Gettysburg, where we remained until the following day in the hope that the enemy would give us battle on ground of our own selection. My loss in this terrible battle was heavy, including some of the most valuable officers of the command. Major J. W. Latimer of Andrews' battalion, the boy major, whose chivalrous bearing on so many fields had won for him a reputation to be envied by his seniors,--received a severe wou
n bearing testimony to the gallantry of Brigadier-General Daniel and Colonel O'Neal, and to Brigadier-General Smith and their brigades while under my command. We marched on the 5th across the mountain by Waynesboroa towards Hagerstown, and remained for a few days within three miles of the latter place. Thence the division moved two and a half miles from Hagerstown and formed line of battle on both sides of and perpendicular to the Hagerstown and Williamsport pike. On the night of the 13th, I recrossed the Potomac one mile above Williamsport, and continued the march next day to within four miles of Martinsburg, thence to Darksville on the 15th, where we remained until ordered to return to Martinsburg to destroy the Baltimore and Ohio railroad and repel an advance of the enemy. This done the division, by steady marches, recrossed the Blue Ridge at Front Royal and went into camp near Orange Courthouse about the 1st of August. The casualties in my division during the operation
. We marched on the 5th across the mountain by Waynesboroa towards Hagerstown, and remained for a few days within three miles of the latter place. Thence the division moved two and a half miles from Hagerstown and formed line of battle on both sides of and perpendicular to the Hagerstown and Williamsport pike. On the night of the 13th, I recrossed the Potomac one mile above Williamsport, and continued the march next day to within four miles of Martinsburg, thence to Darksville on the 15th, where we remained until ordered to return to Martinsburg to destroy the Baltimore and Ohio railroad and repel an advance of the enemy. This done the division, by steady marches, recrossed the Blue Ridge at Front Royal and went into camp near Orange Courthouse about the 1st of August. The casualties in my division during the operations around Gettysburg were-- Killed,219 Wounded,1,229 Missing,375   Total,1,823 I am, Major, with great respect, your obedient servant, Edward Joh
e now secured the remainder of the Confederate reports of the Gettysburg campaign, and propose to publish from time to time the division and brigade reports which we have not yet published, so that our Papers may contain the full official history of the Confederate operations in that great campaign. Report of General Edward Johnson. headquarters Johnson's division, September 30th, 1863. Major — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from June 15th to July 31st, 1863, embracing the campaign in Pennsylvania and battle of Gettysburg. My division comprised the Stonewall brigade, Brigadier-Gen-J. A. Walker, consisting of the Second, Fourth, Fifth, Twenty-seventh and Thirty-third Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Nadenbousch, Major Terry, Colonel Funk, Lieutenant-Colonel Shriver and Captain Golliday; J. M. Jones' brigade, consisting of the Twenty-first, Twenty-fifth, Forty-second, Forty-fourth, Forty-eighth and Fift
n, Major Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, Major Parsley and Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert; Nicholls' brigade, Colonel J. M. Williams commanding, consisting of First, Second, Tenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Louisiana regiments, commanded respectively by Lieutenant-Colonel Nolan, Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, Major Powell, Lieutenant-Colonel Zable and Major Brady, with Andrews' battalion of artillery, Major Latimer commanding, consisting of Raines', Dement's, Brown's and Carpenter's batteries. On June 16th my division left camp at Stephenson's and marched to Sbepherdstown, where Jones' brigade was temporarily detached, with orders to destroy a number of canal boats and a quantity of grain and flour stored at different points, and cut the canal (Chesapeake and Ohio canal). A report of his operations and the disposition made of his captures has been forwarded. June 18th we crossed the Potomac at Boteler's ford and encamped upon the battle-ground of Sharpsburg; thence marched via Hagersto
alion of artillery, Major Latimer commanding, consisting of Raines', Dement's, Brown's and Carpenter's batteries. On June 16th my division left camp at Stephenson's and marched to Sbepherdstown, where Jones' brigade was temporarily detached, with orders to destroy a number of canal boats and a quantity of grain and flour stored at different points, and cut the canal (Chesapeake and Ohio canal). A report of his operations and the disposition made of his captures has been forwarded. June 18th we crossed the Potomac at Boteler's ford and encamped upon the battle-ground of Sharpsburg; thence marched via Hagerstown and Chambersburg to within three miles of Carlisle. From Greencastle, Steuart's brigade was ordered to McConnellsburg to collect horses, cattle and other supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my divis
ther supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my division to Greenville, thence eastwardly by way of Scotland to Gettysburg — not arriving in time, however, to parti headquarters Heth's division, Camp near Orange Courthouse, September 13, 1863. Captain — I have the honor to report the operations of my division from the 29th June until the 1st of July, including the part it took in the battle of Gettysburg--first day--July 1st, 1863. The division reached Cashtown, Pennsylvania, on the 29th of June. Cashtown is situated at the base of the South Mountain, on the direct road from Chambersburg via Fayetteville to Gettysburg, and nine miles from the latter place. On the morning of the 30th of June, I ordered Brigadier-General Pettigrew to take his brigade to Gettysburg, search the town for army supplies, shoes e
r Orange Courthouse, September 13, 1863. Captain — I have the honor to report the operations of my division from the 29th June until the 1st of July, including the part it took in the battle of Gettysburg--first day--July 1st, 1863. The division reached Cashtown, Pennsylvania, on the 29th of June. Cashtown is situated at the base of the South Mountain, on the direct road from Chambersburg via Fayetteville to Gettysburg, and nine miles from the latter place. On the morning of the 30th of June, I ordered Brigadier-General Pettigrew to take his brigade to Gettysburg, search the town for army supplies, shoes especially, and return the same day. On reaching the suburbs of Gettysburg, General Pettigrew found a large force of cavalry near the town, supported by an infantry force. Under these circumstances he did not deem it advisable to enter the town, and returned, as directed, to Cashtown. The result of General Pettigrew's observations was reported to Lieutenant-General Hill, wh
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...