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ullough's brigade was selected for Milliken's; Hawes' for Young's, and Randall's was to be in resercapacity for handling masses. I turn now to Hawes' operations: No report was received from him tnal officer, returned and informed me that General Hawes was falling back; that he had asked GeneraGeneral Hawes if any attempt was to be made to communicate with Vicksburg, in sight with a good glass, anl corps arrived with some memoranda, which General Hawes directed him to read to me. From these it appears that General Hawes reached the rear of Young's, one mile distant, at 11 A. M. on the 7th; tition of affairs was found at Young's than General Hawes was told to expect, for late as he arrived one of the guides of Harrison's cavalry. General Hawes formed his line of battle, advanced in theposition, but did not think it would pay. General Hawes then returned to the junction of the roads stores. General Walker desired me to see General Hawes to learn the reason of his conduct. I dec
commanders appeared to enter heartily into this plan, and as no troops were to be engaged except their division, I deemed it proper to leave the execution of it to them. McCullough's brigade was selected for Milliken's; Hawes' for Young's, and Randall's was to be in reserve at the intersection of the roads. General Walker decided to accompany this last. Despite my efforts the troops did not move until an hour after the appointed time. McCullough reached Milliken's about dawn, drove in the Confusion ensued, and the gunboat, which at the beginning had no steam up, brought her one gun to bear in the direction of our troops. McCullough dispatched to General Walker, four and a half miles distant, for assistance. Walker moved up with Randall's brigade and some artillery, and found that McCullough had withdrawn out of reach of shells. After examining the position, General Walker reported to me that three additional gunboats, attracted by the firing, had arrived, that he could find n
Operations in the Trans-Mississippi Department in June, 1868. [continued from September number.] The following report ought to have been published just after the letter of General E. Kirby Smith in our September number, and the endorsements which follow that letter were originally on this report. But we, unfortunately, had not at the time a copy of it, and are now indebted to the courtesy of Colonel Scott, of the Archive Bureau at Washington, for this report and the explanatory letter which follows. Report of General R. Taylor. District West Louisiana, Richmond, 8th June, 1863. Brigadier-General W. R. Boggs, Chief of Staff: General — I have the honor to report the events of the past few days. As soon as I learned of the capture of Richmond by Captain McLean, of Harrison's battalion — viz: on the night of the 3d ultimo--I. ordered General Walker to push on a force of two hundred infantry to insure holding the bridge, adding to it two guns of Harrison's artillery. Thi
, leaving, as General Walker reported to me, over two hundred stragglers behind. Harrison's cavalry was sent to bring in these. They were, however, in no danger, as the enemy at the time were rushing aboard their transports and burning stores. General Walker desired me to see General Hawes to learn the reason of his conduct. I declined, directing his report <*>o be written out, and informing General Walker that I should expect him to endorse fully and freely his own opinion upon it. Colonel Bartlett, with about nine hundred men, was ordered to march on Lake Providence, with instructions to break up the camps of negroes in that vicinity, who were being organized and drilled by the enemy, and thence push his cavalry down to Milliken's Bend, breaking up the plantations in cultivation by agents or contractors of the United States Government. On the 5th he was at Floyd, building a bridge across the Macon, distant about twenty-five miles from Lake Providence; since that date I have rece
command, acquainted with the country, were selected to accompany each of the attacking columns. My signal officer, Lieutenant Routh, with a party of his men, was ordered to accompany the column from Young's and make every effort to communicate withing masses. I turn now to Hawes' operations: No report was received from him till late in the evening of the 7th--Lieutenant Routh, signal officer, returned and informed me that General Hawes was falling back; that he had asked General Hawes if any attempt was to be made to communicate with Vicksburg, in sight with a good glass, and received a negative reply. Lieutenant Routh then attempted to make his own way down the point, but meeting some armed Yankees and negroes was forced to return. Shortly after Lieutenant Routh's report, a man of the signal corps arrived with some memoranda, which General Hawes directed him to read to me. From these it appears that General Hawes reached the rear of Young's, one mile distant, at 11 A. M. on the
James N. Dunlop (search for this): chapter 11.82
or to report the events of the past few days. As soon as I learned of the capture of Richmond by Captain McLean, of Harrison's battalion — viz: on the night of the 3d ultimo--I. ordered General Walker to push on a force of two hundred infantry to insure holding the bridge, adding to it two guns of Harrison's artillery. This force crossed the Tensas in a flat which I had secured the day before and reached Richmond at sunset on the 4th. On the same day General Walker camped three miles from Dunlop's, on Tensas. I had succeeded in collecting material for a bridge (there being but one flat, the one above mentioned, on the river), and on the morning of the 5th commenced the work, superintending it in person. At 4 P. M. a substantial bridge was completed, when I pushed on to this point, sending notice to General Walker of the completion of the bridge. Arriving at dusk, I soon met Major Harrison from below. He reported the parish of Tensas and Lower Madison clear of the enemy. One of
are now indebted to the courtesy of Colonel Scott, of the Archive Bureau at Washington, for this report and the explanatory letter which follows. Report of General R. Taylor. District West Louisiana, Richmond, 8th June, 1863. Brigadier-General W. R. Boggs, Chief of Staff: General — I have the honor to report the events of the past few days. As soon as I learned of the capture of Richmond by Captain McLean, of Harrison's battalion — viz: on the night of the 3d ultimo--I. ordered Genwhich are every day increasing in interest. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. Taylor, Major-General Commanding. Letter from General R. Taylor. headquarters District West Louisiana, Washington, October 15, 1863. Brigadier-General W. R. Boggs, Chief of Staff: General — It has just been brought to my attention by Major-General J. L. Walker, that the language of my report touching operations near Milliken's Bend reflects on him. He learns this from one of his staff just f<
esence of the enemy. I shall use every exertion, by placing an adequate force of cavalry and light artillery on the bank of the river, to annoy and interfere with the navigation of the stream by transports, upon which Grant is dependent for his supplies by way of the Yazoo river. As soon as Tappan's brigade can reach Richmond, I shall withdraw Walker's division to operate south of Red river. An additional cavalry force is needed in this section, and I have the honor to request that Captain Nutt's company of mounted men may be immediately ordered to report to Colonel Harrison, in accordance with the understanding which I have with the Lieutenant-General Commanding on this subject. I regret exceedingly that I am unable to report results commensurate with the force employed on this expedition; much greater loss ought to have been inflicted upon the enemy, and the stores which he burned ought to have been captured for our use. I beg the Lieutenant-General Commanding to believe t
iginally on this report. But we, unfortunately, had not at the time a copy of it, and are now indebted to the courtesy of Colonel Scott, of the Archive Bureau at Washington, for this report and the explanatory letter which follows. Report of General R. Taylor. District West Louisiana, Richmond, 8th June, 1863. Brigadier-General W. R. Boggs, Chief of Staff: General — I have the honor to report the events of the past few days. As soon as I learned of the capture of Richmond by Captain McLean, of Harrison's battalion — viz: on the night of the 3d ultimo--I. ordered General Walker to push on a force of two hundred infantry to insure holding the bridge, adding to it two guns of Harrison's artillery. This force crossed the Tensas in a flat which I had secured the day before and reached Richmond at sunset on the 4th. On the same day General Walker camped three miles from Dunlop's, on Tensas. I had succeeded in collecting material for a bridge (there being but one flat, the one
W. P. Harrison (search for this): chapter 11.82
the capture of Richmond by Captain McLean, of Harrison's battalion — viz: on the night of the 3d ult holding the bridge, adding to it two guns of Harrison's artillery. This force crossed the Tensas iso secured. Captain McCall had sixty men. Major Harrison brought off some few arms, medicines, etc.had been burned. To finish the operations of Harrison's cavalry: On the morning of the 6th,whilst ame to be approaching from Milliken's Bend. Major Harrison with a hundred men advanced to meet them. the Bend. I cannot speak too highly of Major Harrison as a cavalry officer I do not think he hasfew pickets and some small bands of negroes. Harrison had cleared everything below Bedford. All a force, believing Richmond to be occupied by Harrison's command alone, I determined to act at once.int six miles from Richmond. Twenty men from Harrison's command, acquainted with the country, were rely wounding in the arm one of the guides of Harrison's cavalry. General Hawes formed his line of [4 more...]
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