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ept their division, I deemed it proper to leave the execution of it to them. McCullough's brigade was selected for Milliken's; Hawes' for Young's, and Randall's was e my efforts the troops did not move until an hour after the appointed time. McCullough reached Milliken's about dawn, drove in the enemy's pickets and in obedience had no steam up, brought her one gun to bear in the direction of our troops. McCullough dispatched to General Walker, four and a half miles distant, for assistance. Walker moved up with Randall's brigade and some artillery, and found that McCullough had withdrawn out of reach of shells. After examining the position, General Waland judgment been displayed the work would all have been completed by 8 A. M. McCullough's brigade lost some twenty killed and perhaps eighty wounded. A very large nuome few small arms and commissary stores were also taken. In this affair General McCullough appears to have shown great personal bravery, but no capacity for handlin
Macon, distant about twenty-five miles from Lake Providence; since that date I have received no report from him. If he succeeds in the operations entrusted to him the west bank of the Mississippi river, from the mouth of Red river to the Arkansas line, will be free from the presence of the enemy. I shall use every exertion, by placing an adequate force of cavalry and light artillery on the bank of the river, to annoy and interfere with the navigation of the stream by transports, upon which Grant is dependent for his supplies by way of the Yazoo river. As soon as Tappan's brigade can reach Richmond, I shall withdraw Walker's division to operate south of Red river. An additional cavalry force is needed in this section, and I have the honor to request that Captain Nutt's company of mounted men may be immediately ordered to report to Colonel Harrison, in accordance with the understanding which I have with the Lieutenant-General Commanding on this subject. I regret exceedingly tha
E. Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 11.82
Operations in the Trans-Mississippi Department in June, 1868. [continued from September number.] The following report ought to have been published just after the letter of General E. Kirby Smith in our September number, and the endorsements which follow that letter were originally on this report. But we, unfortunately, had not at the time a copy of it, and are now indebted to the courtesy of Colonel Scott, of the Archive Bureau at Washington, for this report and the explanatory letter whict this communication be forwarded. Respectfully, your obedient servant, R. Taylor, Major-General. First endorsement: Headquarters Department Trans-Mississippi, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1st November, 1863.--Respectfully forwarded. E. Kirby Smith, Lieutenant-General Commanding. Second endorsement. Adjutant and Inspector-General's Office, December 4th, 1863.--Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War. H. L. Clay, Assistant Adjutant-General. Third endorsement:
I have received no report from him. If he succeeds in the operations entrusted to him the west bank of the Mississippi river, from the mouth of Red river to the Arkansas line, will be free from the presence of the enemy. I shall use every exertion, by placing an adequate force of cavalry and light artillery on the bank of the river, to annoy and interfere with the navigation of the stream by transports, upon which Grant is dependent for his supplies by way of the Yazoo river. As soon as Tappan's brigade can reach Richmond, I shall withdraw Walker's division to operate south of Red river. An additional cavalry force is needed in this section, and I have the honor to request that Captain Nutt's company of mounted men may be immediately ordered to report to Colonel Harrison, in accordance with the understanding which I have with the Lieutenant-General Commanding on this subject. I regret exceedingly that I am unable to report results commensurate with the force employed on this e
a large number of negroes drilling. Below that point to Milliken's he had a number of plantations at work under the new system. At Milliken's there was a negro brigade of uncertain strength, and. four companies of Tenth Illinois cavalry (the foronsiderably separated; the negroes up the river. Between Milliken's and Young's Point (opposite the mouth of Yazoo), a distove at 6 P. M. The distances from Richmond to Young's and Milliken's respectively are twenty and ten miles, and the road is ted General Walker to send one brigade to Young's, one to Milliken's and hold the third in reserve at a point six miles fromctively to Duckport, nearly equi-distant from Young's and Milliken's, where a road struck off from the river and fell into tion of it to them. McCullough's brigade was selected for Milliken's; Hawes' for Young's, and Randall's was to be in reservetil an hour after the appointed time. McCullough reached Milliken's about dawn, drove in the enemy's pickets and in obedien
rify the original words used, I respectfully ask the Lieutenant-General Commanding to convey to the War Department the statement that nothing in the report was intended to reflect directly or indirectly on General Walker. The plan was mine, and the position held by General Walker was strictly in accordance with my orders. The misconception existing at Richmond is calculated to injure unjustly a meritorious officer, and I ask that this communication be forwarded. Respectfully, your obedient servant, R. Taylor, Major-General. First endorsement: Headquarters Department Trans-Mississippi, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1st November, 1863.--Respectfully forwarded. E. Kirby Smith, Lieutenant-General Commanding. Second endorsement. Adjutant and Inspector-General's Office, December 4th, 1863.--Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War. H. L. Clay, Assistant Adjutant-General. Third endorsement: Noted-File with report, 8th December, 1863. J. A. S., Secretary.
ould admit. Besides, the division commander had weeks before expressed to the Lieutenant-General Commanding his ardent desire to undertake this or a similar expedition. Unfortunately, I discovered too late that the officers and men of the division were possessed of a dread of gunboats, such as pervaded our people at the commencement of the war. To this circumstance, and to want of mobility in these troops, are to be attributed the meagre results of the expedition. I leave this evening for Monroe and Alexandria, to look after affairs in the southern portion of the State, which are every day increasing in interest. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. Taylor, Major-General Commanding. Letter from General R. Taylor. headquarters District West Louisiana, Washington, October 15, 1863. Brigadier-General W. R. Boggs, Chief of Staff: General — It has just been brought to my attention by Major-General J. L. Walker, that the language of my report touching operations ne
John D. Young (search for this): chapter 11.82
ions and be ready to move at 6 P. M. The distances from Richmond to Young's and Milliken's respectively are twenty and ten miles, and the roa from gunboats. I instructed General Walker to send one brigade to Young's, one to Milliken's and hold the third in reserve at a point six m, with a party of his men, was ordered to accompany the column from Young's and make every effort to communicate with Vicksburg, and the gread down the river respectively to Duckport, nearly equi-distant from Young's and Milliken's, where a road struck off from the river and fell ithem. McCullough's brigade was selected for Milliken's; Hawes' for Young's, and Randall's was to be in reserve at the intersection of the roto me. From these it appears that General Hawes reached the rear of Young's, one mile distant, at 11 A. M. on the 7th; that he had consumed sher appears that a more favorable condition of affairs was found at Young's than General Hawes was told to expect, for late as he arrived he
J. L. Walker (search for this): chapter 11.82
pushed on to this point, sending notice to General Walker of the completion of the bridge. Arriving of annoyance from gunboats. I instructed General Walker to send one brigade to Young's, one to Miluld not be provided, was to be burned. Major-General Walker and his brigade commanders appeared to reserve at the intersection of the roads. General Walker decided to accompany this last. Despite mn of our troops. McCullough dispatched to General Walker, four and a half miles distant, for assist than he had taken to advance, leaving, as General Walker reported to me, over two hundred straggleroard their transports and burning stores. General Walker desired me to see General Hawes to learn t report <*>o be written out, and informing General Walker that I should expect him to endorse fully scouts, quartermasters and commissaries. General Walker's division was suddenly and secretly throwjust been brought to my attention by Major-General J. L. Walker, that the language of my report touc[10 more...]
on to this point, sending notice to General Walker of the completion of the bridge. Arriving at dusk, I soon met Major Harrison from below. He reported the parish of Tensas and Lower Madison clear of the enemy. One of his companies, under Captain McCall, attacked on the morning of the 4th a negro camp on Lake Saint Joseph. He found them some ninety strong; killed the captain (white), twelve negroes and captured the remainder. Some sixty women and children in the camp were also secured. CaCaptain McCall had sixty men. Major Harrison brought off some few arms, medicines, etc., from Perkins, Surget's Basin and Carthage, all of which points he found abandoned by the enemy. At several places much property had been burned. To finish the operations of Harrison's cavalry: On the morning of the 6th,whilst awaiting Walker's arrival, the en emy's cavalry was reported to me to be approaching from Milliken's Bend. Major Harrison with a hundred men advanced to meet them. Three miles distant
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