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Beaver Dam (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
family, and Mrs. Stuart were that morning (the 12th) at the depot doing all in their power to relieve the many wounded and dying who had been started to Richmond by General Lee, but captured by the Yankees while on their way and left by them at Beaver Dam, two days before. While there, at about twelve o'clock, Colonel Fontaine received the dispatch, which read as follows: General Stuart has been seriously wounded; come at once. Colonel Fontaine hurried the party home, but did not tell Mrs. Stuhaving been destroyed between those points, and at a few minutes after one o'clock they started — there not having been one moment's delay. The Rev. Dr. Woodbridge, who had been visiting his son, a member of General Stuart's command, reached Beaver Dam that morning, and at once offered to escort Mrs. Stuart in her sad journey. Mr. Charles Carter, of Hanover county, proved himself also the kind and attentive friend. Some two hours or more were consumed in reaching Ashland, for the engineer
Telegraph (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
whole line at the same time. As he always did, the General hastened to the point where the greatest danger threatened — the point against which the enemy directed the mounted charge. My horse was so much exhausted by my severe ride of the morning that I could not follow him, but Captain Dorsey gave the particulars that follow. The enemy's charge captured our battery on the left of our line, and drove back almost the entire left. Where Captain Dorsey was stationed — immediately on the Telegraph road — about eighty men had collected together, and among these the General threw himself, and by his personal example held them steady while the enemy charged entirely past their position. With these men he fired into their flank and rear, as they passed him, in advancing and in retreating, for they were met by a mounted charge of the First Virginia cavalry and driven back some distance. As they retired. one man, who had been dismounted in the charge and was running out on foot, turned<
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
ter, only seven months old, to whom he had given the name Virginia, named for the State in whose defence he yielded up his life. The child he lost was a daughter, Flora. She died November 3, 1862, when the Confederate cavalry were for fourteen consecutive days fighting untiringly, holding in check the whole of Pleasanton's cavalry, supported heavily by infantry, who were covering McClellan s march across to Fauquier, when McClellan was superseded by Burnside, before the army moved to Fredericksburg. The loss of this dearly loved child was a great blow to him, greatly increased by his utter inability to be with her; but in his letters be expressed the most beautiful Christian resignation and his perfect willingness to meet the same great change whenever his Maker should call. The world knows little of the circumstances which led to and immediately followed the wounding of General J. E. B. Stuart, at Yellow Tavern, in May, 1864. Some have pretended to tell what they saw ; bu
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
ng of the 11th May, a telegram was written by Major H. von Borcke, and sent, as he supposed, to Mrs. Stuart, who was at Colonel Edmund Fontaine's, near Beaver Dam station. It was found to be impossible to send it direct, as all communication had been cut off, both by way of what was then the Central railroad and telegraph line and by the Fredericksburg railroad. Some delay was thus occasioned, and the dispatch was not actually on its way until the next morning; then it was sent by way of Lynchburg and Gordonsville, and some difficulty attended its transmission by that line. Colonel Fontaine, with several members of his family, and Mrs. Stuart were that morning (the 12th) at the depot doing all in their power to relieve the many wounded and dying who had been started to Richmond by General Lee, but captured by the Yankees while on their way and left by them at Beaver Dam, two days before. While there, at about twelve o'clock, Colonel Fontaine received the dispatch, which read as
Yellow Tavern (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
McClellan was superseded by Burnside, before the army moved to Fredericksburg. The loss of this dearly loved child was a great blow to him, greatly increased by his utter inability to be with her; but in his letters be expressed the most beautiful Christian resignation and his perfect willingness to meet the same great change whenever his Maker should call. The world knows little of the circumstances which led to and immediately followed the wounding of General J. E. B. Stuart, at Yellow Tavern, in May, 1864. Some have pretended to tell what they saw ; but the truth has been painfully distorted. The account given below was written by Major H. B. McClellan to Mrs. Stuart, not long after the General's death. The incidents of the charge in which the General received his wound were related to the Major by Captain Dorsey, of the Maryland company, First Virginia cavalry, who was by the General's side at the time. Major A. R. Venable, a member of the staff, was with him also alm
Patrick County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
devoted wife the sad intelligence awaiting her. During that day, in his longing desire to once more see his dear ones, this noble man had done what he had never before consented to do — use spirits as a stimulant, hoping thus to delay, for a few hours, what he well knew to be inevitable. But God's will must be done, and for a wise purpose, no doubt, this last hope was denied. A second error occurs in the latter part of the article, in regard to General Stuart's age. He was born in Patrick county, on the 6th of February, 1833; died 12th of May, 1864, being thirty one years, three months and six days old. A third error is in reference to the death of his child. He left two children — a son, who bears his father's name, and a baby daughter, only seven months old, to whom he had given the name Virginia, named for the State in whose defence he yielded up his life. The child he lost was a daughter, Flora. She died November 3, 1862, when the Confederate cavalry were for fourtee
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
ild. He left two children — a son, who bears his father's name, and a baby daughter, only seven months old, to whom he had given the name Virginia, named for the State in whose defence he yielded up his life. The child he lost was a daughter, Flora. She died November 3, 1862, when the Confederate cavalry were for fourteen consecutive days fighting untiringly, holding in check the whole of Pleasanton's cavalry, supported heavily by infantry, who were covering McClellan s march across to Fauquier, when McClellan was superseded by Burnside, before the army moved to Fredericksburg. The loss of this dearly loved child was a great blow to him, greatly increased by his utter inability to be with her; but in his letters be expressed the most beautiful Christian resignation and his perfect willingness to meet the same great change whenever his Maker should call. The world knows little of the circumstances which led to and immediately followed the wounding of General J. E. B. Stuart,
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
May, a telegram was written by Major H. von Borcke, and sent, as he supposed, to Mrs. Stuart, who was at Colonel Edmund Fontaine's, near Beaver Dam station. It was found to be impossible to send it direct, as all communication had been cut off, both by way of what was then the Central railroad and telegraph line and by the Fredericksburg railroad. Some delay was thus occasioned, and the dispatch was not actually on its way until the next morning; then it was sent by way of Lynchburg and Gordonsville, and some difficulty attended its transmission by that line. Colonel Fontaine, with several members of his family, and Mrs. Stuart were that morning (the 12th) at the depot doing all in their power to relieve the many wounded and dying who had been started to Richmond by General Lee, but captured by the Yankees while on their way and left by them at Beaver Dam, two days before. While there, at about twelve o'clock, Colonel Fontaine received the dispatch, which read as follows: General
Hanover County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
fe. Colonel Fontaine had made some arrangement for an engine and car to carry Mrs. Stuart and little children to Ashland, that road not having been destroyed between those points, and at a few minutes after one o'clock they started — there not having been one moment's delay. The Rev. Dr. Woodbridge, who had been visiting his son, a member of General Stuart's command, reached Beaver Dam that morning, and at once offered to escort Mrs. Stuart in her sad journey. Mr. Charles Carter, of Hanover county, proved himself also the kind and attentive friend. Some two hours or more were consumed in reaching Ashland, for the engineer was a volunteer. At that place a new difficulty presented itself. How was the party to go from there to Richmond? Fortunately, an ambulance had just been made ready for the trip, in which one or more wounded cavalry officers were going; these most courteously insisted upon Mrs. Stuart using it. Under the circumstances Dr. Woodbridge acccepted it for her, an
Ashland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.21
broken to her by his gentle and compassionate wife. Colonel Fontaine had made some arrangement for an engine and car to carry Mrs. Stuart and little children to Ashland, that road not having been destroyed between those points, and at a few minutes after one o'clock they started — there not having been one moment's delay. The in her sad journey. Mr. Charles Carter, of Hanover county, proved himself also the kind and attentive friend. Some two hours or more were consumed in reaching Ashland, for the engineer was a volunteer. At that place a new difficulty presented itself. How was the party to go from there to Richmond? Fortunately, an ambulance hg it. Under the circumstances Dr. Woodbridge acccepted it for her, and in a few minutes they were on their way. The roads were very bad, and soon after leaving Ashland a heavy storm gathered, and it became dark and threatening, with constant and terrifying flashes of lightning; but still they pushed on. Frequently on the way sol
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