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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
ed was soft and glistening white. Too white and clean to be soiled by the occupancy of two Confederate soldiers who had not had a change of underclothing for many weeks. They looked at it, felt of it, spread their old blankets on the neat carpet and slept there till near the break of day. While it was yet dark the travelers, unwilling to lose time waiting for breakfast, crept out of the house, leaving their thanks for their kind hostess, and pressed rapidly on to Manikin Town, on the James River and Kanawha canal, half a day's march from Richmond, where they arrived while it was yet early morning. The green sward between the canal and river was inviting and the survivors laid there awhile to rest and determine whether or not they would push on to the city. They decided to do so as soon as they could find a breakfast to fit them for the day's march. A short walk placed them at the yard gate of a house prominent by reason of its size and finish. Everything indicated comfort,
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
y refreshed. It seems that General Lee pursued the road which the survivors chose, and starting later than they, overtook them, he being mounted and they on foot. At any rate it was their good fortune to see him three times on the road from Appomattox to Richmond. The incidents introducing General Lee are peculiarly interesting, and while the writer is in doubt as to the day on which the next and last incident occurred, the reader may rest assured of the truthfulness of the narration as to od behind the tall gate, and without a motion towards opening it replied to the cheery good morning, sir! of the soldiers with a sullen morn — what do you want here? We are from Richmond, sir, members of the------. We are on our way home from Appomattox, where the army was surrendered, and called to ask if you could spare us something to eat before we start on the day's march. Oh! yes! I know about the surrender! I do. Some scoundrels were here last night and stole my best mare — d----em! N
Cartersville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.30
e porch on which they stood, and slowly raising his hand to his hat, raised it slightly and as slowly again dropped his hand to his side. The survivors did not weep, but they had strange sensations. They passed on, steering, so to speak, for Cartersville and the ferry. Before leaving the village it was the sad duty of the survivors to stop at the humble abode of Mrs. P., and tell her of the death of her husband, who fell mortally wounded, pierced by a musket ball near Sailor's creek. She w, recently transferred to artillery, and therefore wore a small knapsack as infantrymen did. The ball struck the knapsack with a whack! and knocked the man down. That was all. Some time during the night the travelers reached the ferry at Cartersville. Darkness and silence prevailed there. Loud and continued shouts brought no ferryman, and eager searchings revealed no boat. The depth of the water being a thing unknown and not easily found out, it was obviously prudent to camp for the nig
Carlton McCarthy (search for this): chapter 4.30
Detailed Minutia of soldier life. By Private Carlton McCarthy. Paper no. 6--brave survivors Homeward bound. [This is the last of a series of papers which have been widely read and complimented for their vivid pictures of the life of the private soldier.] Bitter grief for the past, which seemed to be forever lost, and present humiliation could not long suppress the anxious thought and question, What now? The discussion of the question brought relief from the horrid feeling of vacuity, which oppressed the soldier, and introduced him to the new sensations of liberty of choice, freedom of action — full responsibility. For capital he had a clear conscience, a brave heart, health, strength, and a good record. With these he sought his home. Early in the morning of Wednesday the 12th of April, without the stirring drum or the bugle call of old, the camp awoke to the new life. Whether or not they had a country these soldiers did not know. Home to many, when they reached it, w
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 4.30
eir rear. It was easy to recognize at once General Lee. He rode slowly, calmly along. As he passLooking up, the survivors saw with surprise General Lee approaching. He was entirely alone, and rojourney greatly refreshed. It seems that General Lee pursued the road which the survivors chose,tox to Richmond. The incidents introducing General Lee are peculiarly interesting, and while the wost at once the men on the porch recognized General Lee and his son. They were accompanied by otherelay they entered and approached the house, General Lee preceding the others. Satisfied that it wae right and rear of the house, the voice of General Lee overhauled them thus: Where are you men goiout, addressed the soldiers: Ain't that old General Lee? Yes, General Lee and his son and other ofGeneral Lee and his son and other officers come to dine with you, they replied. Well, she said, he ain't no better than the men that f Well, then, he said, it must be true that General Lee has surrendered. The solemnity of the rema
rrow escapes from negro soldiers on police duty, the satisfaction of seeing two of the boys in blue hung up by their thumbs for pillaging, a few handshakings, and the survivors found their way to the house of a relative, where they did eat bread with thanks. A friend informed the survivors that day that farm hands were needed all around the city. They made a note of that and the name of one farmer. Saturday night the old blankets were spread on the parlor floor. Sunday morning, the 16th of April, they bid farewell to the household and started for the farmer's house. As they were about to start away, the head of the family took from his pocket a handfull of odd silver pieces, and extending it to his guests, told them it was all he had, but they were welcome to half of it! Remembering that he had a wife and three or four children to feed, the soldiers smiled through their teats at his, bade him keep it all and weep for himself rather than for them. So saying, they departed, an
ewell to the household and started for the farmer's house. As they were about to start away, the head of the family took from his pocket a handfull of odd silver pieces, and extending it to his guests, told them it was all he had, but they were welcome to half of it! Remembering that he had a wife and three or four children to feed, the soldiers smiled through their teats at his, bade him keep it all and weep for himself rather than for them. So saying, they departed, and at sundown were at the farmer's house, fourteen miles away. Monday morning, the 17th, they beat their swords (muskets in this case) into plow-shares and did the first day's work of the sixty which the simple farmer secured at a cost to himself of about half rations for two men. Behold the gratitude of a people! Where grow now the shrubs which of old bore leaves and twigs for garlands? The brave live! are the fair dead? Shall time or calamity, downfall or ruin annihilate sacrifice or hatch an ingrate brood?
to be forever lost, and present humiliation could not long suppress the anxious thought and question, What now? The discussion of the question brought relief from the horrid feeling of vacuity, which oppressed the soldier, and introduced him to the new sensations of liberty of choice, freedom of action — full responsibility. For capital he had a clear conscience, a brave heart, health, strength, and a good record. With these he sought his home. Early in the morning of Wednesday the 12th of April, without the stirring drum or the bugle call of old, the camp awoke to the new life. Whether or not they had a country these soldiers did not know. Home to many, when they reached it, was graves and ashes. At any rate there must be, somewhere on earth, a better place than a muddy, smoky camp in a piece of scrubby pines — better company than gloomy, hungry comrades and inquisitive enemies, and something in the future more exciting, if not more hopeful, than nothing to eat, nowhere to s