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July 3rd, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
reports of First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Virginia cavalry. B — Report of Brigadier-General W. E. Jones of engagement near Upperville, June 21st, 1863. C — Report of Brigadier-General William E. Jones of operations of his brigade from the 29th June, 1863, to the 14th July, 1863, inclosing regimental reports of the Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh and Twelfth Virginia cavalry. D--Brigadier-General Wade Hampton's report of the operations of his brigade in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863. E--General Order No. 74, headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, directing the retrograde movement from Gettysburg. Memoranda. Privates Benjamin F. Weller, Company E, and Robert W. Goode, Gompany G, First Virginia cavalry, as couriers at these headquarters, rendered distinguished service, exhibiting rare intelligence, great daring and heroism. My field telegraph operator, J. Thompson Quarles, was present throughout, and when no opportunity offered for practicing in his pr
July 14th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
t servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. List of inclosures. A — Report of operations of General Fitz. Lee's brigade in an engagement at Aldie, Colonel T. T. Munford commanding, and inclosing regimental reports of First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Virginia cavalry. B — Report of Brigadier-General W. E. Jones of engagement near Upperville, June 21st, 1863. C — Report of Brigadier-General William E. Jones of operations of his brigade from the 29th June, 1863, to the 14th July, 1863, inclosing regimental reports of the Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh and Twelfth Virginia cavalry. D--Brigadier-General Wade Hampton's report of the operations of his brigade in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863. E--General Order No. 74, headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, directing the retrograde movement from Gettysburg. Memoranda. Privates Benjamin F. Weller, Company E, and Robert W. Goode, Gompany G, First Virginia cavalry, as couriers at these headquarters, rendere<
July 24th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
lan, of the staff of the old cavalry corps, to give our readers the full text of this important report of the great campaign.] headquarters cavalry division, army of Northery Virginia, August 20th, 1863. To Colonel R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, from the time of crossing the Rappahannock on the 16th day of June, 1863, to the 24th day of July, 1863, when, having recrossed the Blue Ridge after the Pennsylvania campaign, our pickets were reestablished on the south bank of the Rappahannock. After holding in check a cavalry force at least double our own for months, with a command stretched on the outposts from the Blue Ridge to the Chesapeake, engaging in numerous hand-to-hand encounters, illustrating the superiority of Southern cavalry, it was with joy that the order of the Commanding-General to advance was received by the cava
August 20th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
ust, 1876, a fragment of General Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg, which we found, in his own hand writing, among his papers which Mrs. Stuart kindly turned over to us, and which was all we could obtain at the time. We are now able, through the kindness of our friend Major H. B. McClellan, of the staff of the old cavalry corps, to give our readers the full text of this important report of the great campaign.] headquarters cavalry division, army of Northery Virginia, August 20th, 1863. To Colonel R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, from the time of crossing the Rappahannock on the 16th day of June, 1863, to the 24th day of July, 1863, when, having recrossed the Blue Ridge after the Pennsylvania campaign, our pickets were reestablished on the south bank of the Rappahannock. After holding in check a cavalry force at
August, 1876 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. [We published in our issue for August, 1876, a fragment of General Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg, which we found, in his own hand writing, among his papers which Mrs. Stuart kindly turned over to us, and which was all we could obtain at the time. We are now able, through the kindness of our friend Major H. B. McClellan, of the staff of the old cavalry corps, to give our readers the full text of this important report of the great campaign.] headquarters cavalry division, army of Northery Virginia, August 20th, 1863. To Colonel R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, from the time of crossing the Rappahannock on the 16th day of June, 1863, to the 24th day of July, 1863, when, having recrossed the Blue Ridge after the Pennsylvania campaign, our pickets
Turner Ashby (search for this): chapter 9.72
The cavalry crossed at the fords without serious molestation, bringing up the rear on that route by 8 A. M. on the 14th. To Baker's (late Hampton's) brigade was assigned the duty of picketing the Potomac from Falling Waters to Hedgesville. The other brigades were moved back towards Leetown — Robertson's being sent to the fords of the Shenandoah, where he already had a picket, which, under Captain Johnston, of the North Carolina cavalry, had handsomely repulsed the enemy in their advance on Ashby's gap, inflicting severe loss, with great disparity in numbers. Harper's Ferry was again in possession of the enemy, and Colonel Harman, Twelfth Virginia cavalry, had in an engagement with the enemy gained a decided success, but was himself captured by his horse falling. Upon my arrival at the Bower that afternoon (15th), I learned that a large force of the enemy's cavalry was between Shepherdstown and Leetown, and determined at once to attack him, in order to defeat any designs he mig
army were not satisfactorily performed in the absence of my command, it should rather be attributed to the fact that Jenkins' brigade was not as efficient as it ought to have been, and as its numbers (3,800) on leaving Virginia warranted us in expecting. Even at that time by its reduction incident to the campaign, it numbered far more than the cavalry which successfully covered Jackson's flank movement at Chancellorsville, turned back Stoneman from the James, and drove 3,500 cavalry under Averill across the Rappahannock. Properly handled, such a command should have done everything requisite, and left nothing to detract, by the remotest implication, from the brilliant exploits of their comrades, achieved under circumstances of great hardship and danger. Arriving at York, I found that General Early had gone, and it is to be regretted that this officer failed to take any measure, by leaving an intelligent scout to watch for my coming, or a patrol to meet me to acquaint me with hi
taken at nightfall. In this order two brigades of cavalry (Baker's and Hampton's) were ordered to move, as heretofore statedhe other brigades (Fitz. Lee's, Hampton's, now commanded by Baker, and W. H. F. Lee's, commanded by Chambliss) and the Stuarty on the left consisted now of Fitz. Lee's, W. H. F. Lee's, Baker's, and Robertson's brigades — the latter being a mere handfFitz. Lee's brigade holding the line of Longstreet's corps, Baker's of Hill's corps, and the remainder of Ewell's corps. Anging up the rear on that route by 8 A. M. on the 14th. To Baker's (late Hampton's) brigade was assigned the duty of picketithe enemy made a demonstration on Hedgesville, forcing back Baker's brigade. Desultory skirmishing was kept up on that front be found in the reports of Brigadier-General Jones and Colonel Baker. It soon became apparent that the enemy was moving us advance guard through Front Royall and Chester gap, while Baker's brigade was ordered to bring up the rear of Ewell's corps
h of Deep run. I accordingly left the Fifteenth Virginia cavalry, Major Collins, W. H. F. Lee's brigade, on the lower Rappahannock, co-operating with A. P. Hill, and directed Brigadier-General Hampton to remain with the brigade on the Rappahannock in observation of the enemy during the movement of our forces, and directed also Fitz. Lee's brigade (Colonel T. T. Munford temporarily in command) to cross on the morning of the 15th at Rockford, and take the advance of Longstreet's column, via Barbee's cross-roads, and put Robertson's and W. H. F. Lee's brigades en route to cross the Rappahannock lower down (at Hinson's mill), while Jones' brigade followed with orders to picket the Aestham river the first day. The movement was not interrupted, the enemy having disappeared from our front during the night, and our march continued to within a few miles of Salem, to bivouac for the night. Scouting parties were sent to Warrenton, where it was ascertained the enemy had withdrawn his forces to
lows: two brigades on the Cashtown road under General Fitz. Lee, and the remainder (Jenkins' and Chambliss'), under my immediate command, was directed to proceed by way of Emmettsburg, Maryland, so as to guard the other flank. I dispatched Captain Blackford, Corps Engineers, to General Robertson to inform him of my movement and direct his co-operation, as Emmettsburg was in his immediate front and was probably occupied by the enemy's cavalry. It was dark before I had passed the extreme right y, are ascribable to Captain B. S. White, C. S. A., who, though still suffering from a severe wound received at Fleetwood, accompanied the command, and his services proclaim him an officer of merit and distinction. Chief Surgeon Eliason, Captain Blackford, Engineers; Captain Cooke, Ordnance Officer; Lieutenant Dabney, Aid-de-Camp; Assistant Engineer F. G. Robertson, and Cadet Hullihen, C. S. A., and Lieutenant H. Hagan, Virginia provisional army, all performed their duties with commendable z
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