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rmy was already in York or at Harrisburg, where it could choose its battle-ground with the enemy, I hastened to place my command with it. It is believed that had the corps of Hill and Longstreet moved on, instead of halting near Chambersburg, that York could have been the place of concentration instead of Gettysburg. This move of my command between the enemy's seat of government and the army charged with its defence, involved serious loss to the enemy in men and material, over one thousand prderate cavalry, capturing his trains and cutting all his communications with Washington. It is not to be supposed such delay in his operations could have been so effectually caused by any other disposition of the cavalry. Moreover, considering York as the point of junction, as I had every reason to believe it would be, the route I took was quite as direct and more expeditious than the alternate one proposed; and there is reason to believe on that route that my command would have been divided
ngaged dismounted nearly all day. General Jones was farther to the left on the Cavetown road, and the infantry was placed in position, covering Funkstown, with dismounted cavalry on each flank. The enemy's advance was handsomely repulsed, in which Lieutenant-Colonel Witcher's cavalry, on foot behind a stone fence immediately on the left of the turnpike, performed a very gallant part, standing their ground with unflinching tenacity. On the left a portion of Fitz. Lee's brigade under Captain Wooldridge, Fourth Virginia cavalry, who handled his skirmishers with great skill and effect, compelled the enemy's infantry to seek cover in a body of woods, at some distance from our lines. In this day's operations the infantry before mentioned participated very creditably indeed in the centre, and I regret exceedingly that I have not the means of knowing the regiments and commanders, so as to mention them with that particularity to which by their gallantry they are entitled; but their condu
elonging to Lee's brigade, while in the special charge of General Imboden en route to Williamsport, near Mercersburg, were captured by the enemy. A court of inquiry has been convened to inquire into the circumstances of this capture. I, therefore, forbear animadversion on the subject. My command bivouacked near Hagerstown, and I took position that night on the road leading from Hagerstown to Boonsboroa. The next day, July 7th, I proceeded to Downsville, establishing there a portion of Wofford's brigade, sent me for the purpose by General Longstreet, and posted Jenkins' cavalry brigade on that portion of our front in advance of the infantry. Robertson's brigade, being small and the enemy being least threatening from that direction, was assigned to the north front of Hagerstown, connecting with General Jones on the right on the Cavetown road. The Maryland cavalry was ordered on the National road and towards Greencastle on a scout. On the 8th the cavalry was thrown for-ward towa
y had time to rally along a crest of rocks and fences, from which he opened with artillery, raking the road. Jenkins' brigade was ordered to dismount and deploy over the difficult ground. This was done with marked effect and boldness--Lieutenant-Colonel Witcher, as usual, distinguishing himself by his courage and conduct. The enemy, thus dislodged, was closely pressed by the mounted cavalry, but made one effort at a counter charge, which was gallantly met and repulsed by Colonel James B. Gordunted nearly all day. General Jones was farther to the left on the Cavetown road, and the infantry was placed in position, covering Funkstown, with dismounted cavalry on each flank. The enemy's advance was handsomely repulsed, in which Lieutenant-Colonel Witcher's cavalry, on foot behind a stone fence immediately on the left of the turnpike, performed a very gallant part, standing their ground with unflinching tenacity. On the left a portion of Fitz. Lee's brigade under Captain Wooldridge, F
gment of the Fifth North Carolina cavalry--that officer exhibiting, under my eye, individual prowess deserving special commendation. The repulse was soon after converted into a rout by Colonel Lomax's regiment, Eleventh Virginia cavalry, Jones' brigade, which now took the road, and under the gallant leadership of its Colonel, with drawn sabres, charged down the turnpike under a fearful fire of artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel Funsten behaved with conspicuous gallantry in this charge, and Captain Winthrop, a volunteer aid of Lieutenant-General Longstreet, also bore himself most gallantly. The enemy was now very near Williamsport, and this determined and vigorous attack in rear soon compelled him to raise the seige of that place and leave in hasty discomfiture by the Downsville road. His withdrawal was favored by night, which set in just as we reached the ridge overlooking Williamsport. An important auxiliary to this attack was rendered by Brigadier-General Lee, who reached the vic
d the entire command in bivouac on Maryland soil. In this success the horse artillery displayed the same untiring zeal in their laborious toil through mud and water, which has distinguished its members in battle. The canal, which was now the supplying medium of Hooker's army, soon received our attention. A lock-gate was broken, and steps taken to intercept boats-at least a dozen were intercepted; and the next morning several, loaded with troops, negroes and stores, were captured by Colonel Wickham, Fourth Virginia cavalry, commanding rear guard. I ascertained that Hooker was on the day previous at Poolesville, and his army in motion for Frederick. I realized the importance of joining our army in Pennsylvania, and resumed the march northward early on the 28th. General Hampton was sent by Darnestown to Rockville, and the other brigades took the direct route to the same place. General Hampton encountered small parties of the enemy, which, with a number of wagons and teams, he cap
ffect. a junction at Fairfax Courthouse, or farther on, according to circumstances. Fairfax station had been evacuated the previous day, but near this point General Hampton's advance regiment had a spirited encounter with and chase after a detachment of Federal cavalry, denominated Scott's nine hundred, killing, wounding and capturing the greater portion, among them several officers; also horses, arms and equipments. The First North Carolina cavalry lost its Major in the first onset--Major Whittaker--an officer of distinction and great value to us. Reaching Fairfax Courthouse, a communication was received from Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee at Annandale. At these two points there were evidences of very recent occupation; but the information was conclusive that the enemy had left this front entirely, the mobilized army having the day previous moved over towards Leesburg, while the local had retired to the fortications near Washington. I had not heard yet from Major Mosby, but the
B. S. White (search for this): chapter 9.72
Major Henry B. McClellan, my Adjutant-General, was constantly at my side, and with his intelligence, ready pen and quick comprehension, greatly facilitated the discharge of my duties. The untiring energy, force of character and devotion to duty of Major A. R. Venable, my Inspector-General, and Lieutenant G. M. Ryals, C. S. A., Provost-Marshal, deserve my special gratitude and praise. The same qualities, united to a thorough knowledge of much of the country, are ascribable to Captain B. S. White, C. S. A., who, though still suffering from a severe wound received at Fleetwood, accompanied the command, and his services proclaim him an officer of merit and distinction. Chief Surgeon Eliason, Captain Blackford, Engineers; Captain Cooke, Ordnance Officer; Lieutenant Dabney, Aid-de-Camp; Assistant Engineer F. G. Robertson, and Cadet Hullihen, C. S. A., and Lieutenant H. Hagan, Virginia provisional army, all performed their duties with commendable zeal and credit. Major Fitzhu
Benjamin F. Weller (search for this): chapter 9.72
. C — Report of Brigadier-General William E. Jones of operations of his brigade from the 29th June, 1863, to the 14th July, 1863, inclosing regimental reports of the Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh and Twelfth Virginia cavalry. D--Brigadier-General Wade Hampton's report of the operations of his brigade in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863. E--General Order No. 74, headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, directing the retrograde movement from Gettysburg. Memoranda. Privates Benjamin F. Weller, Company E, and Robert W. Goode, Gompany G, First Virginia cavalry, as couriers at these headquarters, rendered distinguished service, exhibiting rare intelligence, great daring and heroism. My field telegraph operator, J. Thompson Quarles, was present throughout, and when no opportunity offered for practicing in his profession, was active and enterprising in the discharge of other duties assigned him. Acting Surgeon S. A. Nelson, Fourth Virginia cavalry, was ever faithful a
Northery Virginia (search for this): chapter 9.72
n our issue for August, 1876, a fragment of General Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg, which we found, in his own hand writing, among his papers which Mrs. Stuart kindly turned over to us, and which was all we could obtain at the time. We are now able, through the kindness of our friend Major H. B. McClellan, of the staff of the old cavalry corps, to give our readers the full text of this important report of the great campaign.] headquarters cavalry division, army of Northery Virginia, August 20th, 1863. To Colonel R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, from the time of crossing the Rappahannock on the 16th day of June, 1863, to the 24th day of July, 1863, when, having recrossed the Blue Ridge after the Pennsylvania campaign, our pickets were reestablished on the south bank of the Rappahannock. After holding in check
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