hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 536 38 Browse Search
Jefferson Forrest 317 1 Browse Search
T. J. Jackson 297 1 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 278 0 Browse Search
J. A. Early 261 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 246 0 Browse Search
R. S. Ewell 227 1 Browse Search
James Longstreet 225 1 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 196 0 Browse Search
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) 190 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 1,202 total hits in 226 results.

... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ...
Taneytown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
to the eastward, and I was directed to communicate with him as early as practicable after crossing the Potomac and place my command on his right flank. It was expected I would find him in York. The newspapers of the enemy, my only source of information, chronicled his arrival there and at Wrightsville on the Susquehanna with great particularity. I, therefore, moved to join him in that vicinity. The enemy's army was moving in a direction parallel to me. I was apprized of its arrival at Taneytown when I was near Hanover, Pennsylvania, but believing from the lapse of time that our army was already in York or at Harrisburg, where it could choose its battle-ground with the enemy, I hastened to place my command with it. It is believed that had the corps of Hill and Longstreet moved on, instead of halting near Chambersburg, that York could have been the place of concentration instead of Gettysburg. This move of my command between the enemy's seat of government and the army charged wi
Sykesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
l at Brookeville that night, and the remainder next day at Cookesville. Among the number were Major Duane and Captain Michler, Engineers, United States army. At Cookesville our advance encountered and put to flight a small party of the enemy, and among the prisoners taken there were some who said they belonged to the Seven hundred loyal Eastern shoremen. Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee reached the railroad soon after daylight, the march having continued all night. The bridge was burnt at Sykesville, and the track torn up at Hood's mill, where the main body crossed it. Measures were taken to intercept trains,. but trains ran to the vicinity of the obstruction, took the alarm and ran back. The various telegraph lines were likewise cut, and communications of the enemy with Washington City thus cut off at every point, and Baltimore threatened. We remained in possession of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad nearly all day. The enemy was ascertained to be moving through Frederick City no
Poolesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
zeal in their laborious toil through mud and water, which has distinguished its members in battle. The canal, which was now the supplying medium of Hooker's army, soon received our attention. A lock-gate was broken, and steps taken to intercept boats-at least a dozen were intercepted; and the next morning several, loaded with troops, negroes and stores, were captured by Colonel Wickham, Fourth Virginia cavalry, commanding rear guard. I ascertained that Hooker was on the day previous at Poolesville, and his army in motion for Frederick. I realized the importance of joining our army in Pennsylvania, and resumed the march northward early on the 28th. General Hampton was sent by Darnestown to Rockville, and the other brigades took the direct route to the same place. General Hampton encountered small parties of the enemy, which, with a number of wagons and teams, he captured, and reached Rockville in advance of the main body. The advance guard of W. H. F. Lee's brigade had a running
Leitersburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
ouching from the mountain--one fork leading to the left by Smithtown, and the other to the right, bearing more towards Leitersburg. I divided my command in order to make the passage more certain--Colonel Ferguson, commanding Jenkins' brigade, takinroute across the country, and relate to him what I knew, as well as what he might discover en route, and moved towards Leitersburg as soon as Colonel Ferguson came up, who, although his advance had forced the passage of the gap, upon the receipt of ecessary circuit of several miles, and not reaching me till after dark. Having heard from the Commanding-General at Leitersburg about daylight next morning (six o'clock), and being satisfied that all of Kilpatrick's force had gone towards Boonsboich point I desired him to hold, covering the eastern front of Hagerstown. Chambliss' brigade proceeded direct from Leitersburg to Hagerstown, and Robertson's took the same route, both together a very small command. Diverging from Jones' line
Jefferson, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
division occupying the extreme left of our infantry, very near Hagerstown, a little north of the National road. Cavalry pickets were extended beyond the railroad leading to Chambersburg, and everything put in readiness to resist the enemy's attack. The situation of our communications south of the Potomac caused the Commanding-General to desire more cavalry on that side, and accordingly Brigadier-General Jones' brigade (one of whose regiments, Twelfth Virginia cavalry, had been left in Jefferson) was detached and sent to cover our communication with Winchester. The cavalry on the left consisted now of Fitz. Lee's, W. H. F. Lee's, Baker's, and Robertson's brigades — the latter being a mere handful. On the 13th skirmishing continued at intervals; but it appeared that the enemy, instead of attacking, was entrenching himself in our front, and the Commanding-General determined to cross the Potomac. The night of the 13th was chosen for this move, and the arduous and difficult tas
Hood's Mill (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
emainder next day at Cookesville. Among the number were Major Duane and Captain Michler, Engineers, United States army. At Cookesville our advance encountered and put to flight a small party of the enemy, and among the prisoners taken there were some who said they belonged to the Seven hundred loyal Eastern shoremen. Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee reached the railroad soon after daylight, the march having continued all night. The bridge was burnt at Sykesville, and the track torn up at Hood's mill, where the main body crossed it. Measures were taken to intercept trains,. but trains ran to the vicinity of the obstruction, took the alarm and ran back. The various telegraph lines were likewise cut, and communications of the enemy with Washington City thus cut off at every point, and Baltimore threatened. We remained in possession of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad nearly all day. The enemy was ascertained to be moving through Frederick City northward, and it was important for me
Funkstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
proceed on the Boonsboroa road a few miles, and thence proceed to Funkstown, which point I desired him to hold, covering the eastern front ofdesired object had been fully attained, I began to retire towards Funkstown, except Jenkins' brigade, which was ordered to its former positioover the plain. The command moved leisurely to the vicinity of Funkstown and bivouacked for the night. The fight of the 8th administeree enemy on the 9th, and my command kept the position, in front of Funkstown, assigned to it the night before. The left of our main line of battle now rested just in rear of Funkstown — on the Antietam — and some infantry and artillery was thrown forward as a support to the caval Cavetown road, and the infantry was placed in position, covering Funkstown, with dismounted cavalry on each flank. The enemy's advance was is own eye. Owing to the great ease with which the position at Funkstown could be flanked on the right, and by a secret movement at night
Downsville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
ry near Williamsport, and this determined and vigorous attack in rear soon compelled him to raise the seige of that place and leave in hasty discomfiture by the Downsville road. His withdrawal was favored by night, which set in just as we reached the ridge overlooking Williamsport. An important auxiliary to this attack was renMy command bivouacked near Hagerstown, and I took position that night on the road leading from Hagerstown to Boonsboroa. The next day, July 7th, I proceeded to Downsville, establishing there a portion of Wofford's brigade, sent me for the purpose by General Longstreet, and posted Jenkins' cavalry brigade on that portion of our fr the Antietam, which was accordingly done. July 11th was not characterized by any general engagement, except that General Fitz. Lee, now on the right towards Downsville, was compelled to retire upon the main body; and the main body having assumed a shorter line, with its left resting on the National road, just west of Hagerstow
Darnestown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
A lock-gate was broken, and steps taken to intercept boats-at least a dozen were intercepted; and the next morning several, loaded with troops, negroes and stores, were captured by Colonel Wickham, Fourth Virginia cavalry, commanding rear guard. I ascertained that Hooker was on the day previous at Poolesville, and his army in motion for Frederick. I realized the importance of joining our army in Pennsylvania, and resumed the march northward early on the 28th. General Hampton was sent by Darnestown to Rockville, and the other brigades took the direct route to the same place. General Hampton encountered small parties of the enemy, which, with a number of wagons and teams, he captured, and reached Rockville in advance of the main body. The advance guard of W. H. F. Lee's brigade had a running fight with the Second New York .cavalry, but the speed of their horses deprived us of the usual results in captures. At Rockville, General Hampton encountered what he believed to be a large for
Cavetown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.72
s command, and he had made a very narrow escape. He informed me of Imboden's arrival at Williamsport. Having reached Cavetown, I directed General Jones to proceed on the Boonsboroa road a few miles, and thence proceed to Funkstown, which point I town, and Robertson's took the same route, both together a very small command. Diverging from Jones' line of march at Cavetown, I proceeded with Jenkins' brigade by way of Chensville towards Hagerstown. Upon arriving at the former place, it was ang from that direction, was assigned to the north front of Hagerstown, connecting with General Jones on the right on the Cavetown road. The Maryland cavalry was ordered on the National road and towards Greencastle on a scout. On the 8th the cavalrythe Boonsboroa road, and our cavalry was engaged dismounted nearly all day. General Jones was farther to the left on the Cavetown road, and the infantry was placed in position, covering Funkstown, with dismounted cavalry on each flank. The enemy's a
... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ...