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the result would have been disastrous, no doubt. Hampton's and Robertson's brigades were moved to the front to a position previously chosen, of great strength against a force of ordinary size, or against cavalry alone; but although the enemy's advance was held in check gallantly and decidedly for a long time, it soon became evident that the enemy, utterly foiled for days in his attempt to force our lines, had, as usual, brought a heavy infantry force — part of the Fifth corps, under General Vincent--to his support, and its advance was already engaged in conjunction with the cavalry. I, therefore, directed General Hampton to withdraw to the next height whenever his position was hard pressed, and sent orders at once to Colonel Chambliss and General Jones--the former having informed me that the enemy was advancing in heavy force in his front — to afford all the resistance possible, and General Jones to join his left, and retiring apace with the main body, to effect a junction with i
Old Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 9.72
station, with the Twelfth corps, and other infantry supports; the main body of Hooker's army being in Stafford and lower Fauquier, hastening to interpose itself betwis usual daring, penetrated the enemy's lines and caught a staff officer of General Hooker, bearer of dispatches to General Pleasanton, commanding United States cavalry near Aldie. These dispatches disclosed the fact that Hooker was looking to Aldie with solicitude, and that General Pleasanton, with infantry and cavalry, occupieduished its members in battle. The canal, which was now the supplying medium of Hooker's army, soon received our attention. A lock-gate was broken, and steps taken tel Wickham, Fourth Virginia cavalry, commanding rear guard. I ascertained that Hooker was on the day previous at Poolesville, and his army in motion for Frederick. ion of. This place is situated on the direct wagon road from Washington City to Hooker's army, and consequently on his route of communication with Washington after cr
A. R. Venable (search for this): chapter 9.72
cer from Prussia, who so early espoused our cause — was disabled in Fauquier, so as to deprive me of his valuable services on the expedition; but it is hoped the command will not long be deprived of his inspiring presence on the field. Major Henry B. McClellan, my Adjutant-General, was constantly at my side, and with his intelligence, ready pen and quick comprehension, greatly facilitated the discharge of my duties. The untiring energy, force of character and devotion to duty of Major A. R. Venable, my Inspector-General, and Lieutenant G. M. Ryals, C. S. A., Provost-Marshal, deserve my special gratitude and praise. The same qualities, united to a thorough knowledge of much of the country, are ascribable to Captain B. S. White, C. S. A., who, though still suffering from a severe wound received at Fleetwood, accompanied the command, and his services proclaim him an officer of merit and distinction. Chief Surgeon Eliason, Captain Blackford, Engineers; Captain Cooke, Ordnance
B. S. White (search for this): chapter 9.72
Major Henry B. McClellan, my Adjutant-General, was constantly at my side, and with his intelligence, ready pen and quick comprehension, greatly facilitated the discharge of my duties. The untiring energy, force of character and devotion to duty of Major A. R. Venable, my Inspector-General, and Lieutenant G. M. Ryals, C. S. A., Provost-Marshal, deserve my special gratitude and praise. The same qualities, united to a thorough knowledge of much of the country, are ascribable to Captain B. S. White, C. S. A., who, though still suffering from a severe wound received at Fleetwood, accompanied the command, and his services proclaim him an officer of merit and distinction. Chief Surgeon Eliason, Captain Blackford, Engineers; Captain Cooke, Ordnance Officer; Lieutenant Dabney, Aid-de-Camp; Assistant Engineer F. G. Robertson, and Cadet Hullihen, C. S. A., and Lieutenant H. Hagan, Virginia provisional army, all performed their duties with commendable zeal and credit. Major Fitzhu
ent on Jones' front, embracing the Funkstown and Cavetown roads. On the 12th firing began early, and the enemy having advanced on several roads on Hagerstown, our cavalry forces retired with-out serious resistance, and massed on the left of the main body, reaching with heavy outposts the Conococheague on the National road. The infantry having already had time to entrench themselves, it was no longer desirable to defer the enemy's attack. The 13th was spent in reconnoitring on the left-Rodes' division occupying the extreme left of our infantry, very near Hagerstown, a little north of the National road. Cavalry pickets were extended beyond the railroad leading to Chambersburg, and everything put in readiness to resist the enemy's attack. The situation of our communications south of the Potomac caused the Commanding-General to desire more cavalry on that side, and accordingly Brigadier-General Jones' brigade (one of whose regiments, Twelfth Virginia cavalry, had been left in J
body of Hooker's army being in Stafford and lower Fauquier, hastening to interpose itself between our main body and Washington, with a corps or two confronting A. P. Hill's corps at Fredericksburg, having made a lodgement on the south side of the river there near the mouth of Deep run. I accordingly left the Fifteenth Virginia cavalry, Major Collins, W. H. F. Lee's brigade, on the lower Rappahannock, co-operating with A. P. Hill, and directed Brigadier-General Hampton to remain with the brigade on the Rappahannock in observation of the enemy during the movement of our forces, and directed also Fitz. Lee's brigade (Colonel T. T. Munford temporarily in cinent roads — the one north and the other south of Jack mountain, which is a sort of peak in the Blue Ridge chain. In the order of march (retrograde) one corps (Hill's) preceded everything through the mountain; the baggage and prisoners of war, escorted by another corps (Longstreet's), occupied the centre, and the Third (Ewell'
ich I might intercept the enemy should he pass through (Eiler's gap. In and around Emmettsburg we captured sixty or seventy prisoners of war, and some valuable hospital stores en route from Frederick to the army. The march was resumed on the road to Frederick till we reached a small village called Cooperstown, where our route turned short to the right. Here I halted the column to feed, as the horses were much fatigued and famished. The column; after an hour's halt, continued through Harbaugh's valley by Zion church, to pass the Catoctin mountain. The road separated before debouching from the mountain--one fork leading to the left by Smithtown, and the other to the right, bearing more towards Leitersburg. I divided my command in order to make the passage more certain--Colonel Ferguson, commanding Jenkins' brigade, taking the left route, and Chambliss' brigade, which I accompanied, the other. Before reaching the west entrance to this pass, I found it held by the enemy, and had
under the command of its noble Brigadier, who, writhing under a painful attack of inflammatory rheumatism, nevertheless kept with his command until now. At one o'clock at night the brigades, with noiseless march, moved out. This precaution was necessary on account of the enemy's having possession of Bull Run mountain, which in the daytime commanded a view of every movement of consequence in that region. Hancock's corps occupied Thoroughfare gap. Moving to the right we passed through Glasscock's gap, without serious difficulty, and marched for Haymarket. I had previously sent Major Mosby, with some picked men, through to gain the vicinity of Dranesville, find where a crossing was practicable, and bring intelligence to me near Gum Spring to-day (25th). As we neared Haymarket we found that Hancock's corps was en route through Haymarket for Gum Spring, his infantry well distributed through his trains. I chose a good position and opened with artillery with effect on his passing
J. D. Imboden (search for this): chapter 9.72
rtion of the wagon trains and ambulances, under the special charge of Brigadier-General Imboden, who had a mixed command of artillery, infantry and cavalry (his own)agerstown, and thus seriously threaten that portion of our trains which, under Imboden, would be passing down the Greencastle pike the next day, and interpose itselfhim from his command, and he had made a very narrow escape. He informed me of Imboden's arrival at Williamsport. Having reached Cavetown, I directed General Joneallen into the hands of the enemy. For, while some resistance was made by General Imboden, still the size and nature of his command, the peculiar conformation of thnant whom I met but a short distance from the town. Officers present with General Imboden during the attack assure me I am right in the foregoing opinion. I was y of the wagons belonging to Lee's brigade, while in the special charge of General Imboden en route to Williamsport, near Mercersburg, were captured by the enemy. A
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 9.72
he movement of our forces, and directed also Fitz. Lee's brigade (Colonel T. T. Munford temporarilye to the support of either. I accompanied Fitz. Lee's brigade as far as Middleburg, where I rema and distinguished gallantry. Our loss in Fitz. Lee's brigade was heavier, as the fighting was m the 24th the following brigades: Hampton's, Fitz. Lee's, W. H. F. Lee's, rendezvoused secretly nea Having been informed that Generals Hampton and Lee were up, I sent for them to come forward, so th two brigades on the Cashtown road under General Fitz. Lee, and the remainder (Jenkins' and Chamblihe cavalry, except the two brigades with General Fitz. Lee, were now pretty well concentrated at Had by any general engagement, except that General Fitz. Lee, now on the right towards Downsville, waconflict on the turnpike, and found that General Fitz. Lee had, with his own and Chambliss' brigade, and then follow the movement of the army. Fitz. Lee's, W. H. F. Lee's, and Jenkins' brigades, by[41 more...]
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