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hese will be found in the reports of Brigadier-General Jones and Colonel Baker. It soon became apparent that the enemy was moving upon our right flank, availing himself of the swollen condition of the Shenandoah to interpose his army, by a march along the east side of the Blue Ridge, between our present position and Richmond. Longstreet's corps having already moved to counteract this effort, enough cavalry was sent, under Brigadier-General Robertson, for his advance guard through Front Royall and Chester gap, while Baker's brigade was ordered to bring up the rear of Ewell's corps — which was in rear — and Jones' brigade was ordered to picket the lower Shenandoah as long as necessary for the safety of that flank, and then follow the movement of the army. Fitz. Lee's, W. H. F. Lee's, and Jenkins' brigades, by a forced march from the vicinity of Leetown through Millwood, endeavored to reach Manassas gap, so as to hold it on the flank of the army; but it was already in possession of
, therefore, the peculiar functions of cavalry with the army were not satisfactorily performed in the absence of my command, it should rather be attributed to the fact that Jenkins' brigade was not as efficient as it ought to have been, and as its numbers (3,800) on leaving Virginia warranted us in expecting. Even at that time by its reduction incident to the campaign, it numbered far more than the cavalry which successfully covered Jackson's flank movement at Chancellorsville, turned back Stoneman from the James, and drove 3,500 cavalry under Averill across the Rappahannock. Properly handled, such a command should have done everything requisite, and left nothing to detract, by the remotest implication, from the brilliant exploits of their comrades, achieved under circumstances of great hardship and danger. Arriving at York, I found that General Early had gone, and it is to be regretted that this officer failed to take any measure, by leaving an intelligent scout to watch for my
deserve my special gratitude and praise. The same qualities, united to a thorough knowledge of much of the country, are ascribable to Captain B. S. White, C. S. A., who, though still suffering from a severe wound received at Fleetwood, accompanied the command, and his services proclaim him an officer of merit and distinction. Chief Surgeon Eliason, Captain Blackford, Engineers; Captain Cooke, Ordnance Officer; Lieutenant Dabney, Aid-de-Camp; Assistant Engineer F. G. Robertson, and Cadet Hullihen, C. S. A., and Lieutenant H. Hagan, Virginia provisional army, all performed their duties with commendable zeal and credit. Major Fitzhugh, Chief, and Captain J. M. Hanger, Assistant Quartermaster, and Major W. J. Johnson, Chief Commissary, discharged their arduous duties in their usually highly creditable manner. First Lieutenant R. B. Kennon, P. A. C. S., temporarily attached, on two different occasions was entrusted with duties attended with great peril, which he performed in a
John Esten Cooke (search for this): chapter 9.72
duty of Major A. R. Venable, my Inspector-General, and Lieutenant G. M. Ryals, C. S. A., Provost-Marshal, deserve my special gratitude and praise. The same qualities, united to a thorough knowledge of much of the country, are ascribable to Captain B. S. White, C. S. A., who, though still suffering from a severe wound received at Fleetwood, accompanied the command, and his services proclaim him an officer of merit and distinction. Chief Surgeon Eliason, Captain Blackford, Engineers; Captain Cooke, Ordnance Officer; Lieutenant Dabney, Aid-de-Camp; Assistant Engineer F. G. Robertson, and Cadet Hullihen, C. S. A., and Lieutenant H. Hagan, Virginia provisional army, all performed their duties with commendable zeal and credit. Major Fitzhugh, Chief, and Captain J. M. Hanger, Assistant Quartermaster, and Major W. J. Johnson, Chief Commissary, discharged their arduous duties in their usually highly creditable manner. First Lieutenant R. B. Kennon, P. A. C. S., temporarily attached
William E. Jones (search for this): chapter 9.72
res. A — Report of operations of General Fitz. Lee's brigade in an engagement at Aldie, Colonel T. T. Munford commanding, and inclosing regimental reports of First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Virginia cavalry. B — Report of Brigadier-General W. E. Jones of engagement near Upperville, June 21st, 1863. C — Report of Brigadier-General William E. Jones of operations of his brigade from the 29th June, 1863, to the 14th July, 1863, inclosing regimental reports of the Sixth, Seventh, EleBrigadier-General William E. Jones of operations of his brigade from the 29th June, 1863, to the 14th July, 1863, inclosing regimental reports of the Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh and Twelfth Virginia cavalry. D--Brigadier-General Wade Hampton's report of the operations of his brigade in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863. E--General Order No. 74, headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, directing the retrograde movement from Gettysburg. Memoranda. Privates Benjamin F. Weller, Company E, and Robert W. Goode, Gompany G, First Virginia cavalry, as couriers at these headquarters, rendered distinguished service, exhibiting rare intelligence, great dar<
curing, through scouts and reconnoitring parties, information of the enemy's movements. In one of these, Major Mosby, with his usual daring, penetrated the enemy's lines and caught a staff officer of General Hooker, bearer of dispatches to General Pleasanton, commanding United States cavalry near Aldie. These dispatches disclosed the fact that Hooker was looking to Aldie with solicitude, and that General Pleasanton, with infantry and cavalry, occupied the place, and that a reconnoissance in foGeneral Pleasanton, with infantry and cavalry, occupied the place, and that a reconnoissance in force of cavalry was meditated towards Warrenton and Culpeper. I immediately dispatched to General Hampton, who was coming by way of Warrenton from the direction of Beverly's ford, this intelligence, and directed him to meet this advance at Warrenton. The captured dispatches also gave the entire number of divisions, from which we could estimate the approximate strength of the enemy's army. I therefore concluded in no event to attack with cavalry alone the enemy at Aldie. As long as he kept wit
James H. Drake (search for this): chapter 9.72
of battle. The enemy retired to a strong position behind stone fences and barricades near Colonel Boteler's residence, and it being nearly dark, obstinately maintained his ground at this last point until dark, to cover his withdrawal. Preparations were made to renew the attack vigorously next morning, but daybreak revealed that the enemy had retired towards Harper's Ferry. The enemy's loss in killed and wounded was heavy. We had several killed and wounded; and among the latter, Colonel James H. Drake, First Virginia cavalry, was mortally wounded, dying that night (16th), depriving his regiment of a brave and zealous leader and his country of one of her most patriotic defenders. The Commanding-General was very desirous of my moving at once into Loudoun a large portion of my command; but the recent rains had so swollen the Shenandoah that it was impossible to ford it, and cavalry scouting parties had to swim their horses over. In the interval of time from the 16th to the 22d
Beverly Robertson (search for this): chapter 9.72
's column, via Barbee's cross-roads, and put Robertson's and W. H. F. Lee's brigades en route to cr driven back upon the main body, composed of Robertson's and W. H. F. Lee's brigades, posted far en been disastrous, no doubt. Hampton's and Robertson's brigades were moved to the front to a posif Upperville. The enemy attacked Brigadier-General Robertson, bringing up the rear in this movemof artillery and caissons and ambulances. Robertson's and Jones' brigades, under command of the the Commanding-General, instructed Brigadier-General Robertson, whose two brigades (his own and Jod Captain Blackford, Corps Engineers, to General Robertson to inform him of my movement and direct es designated in my instructions to Brigadier-General Robertson. I halted for a short time to procd direct from Leitersburg to Hagerstown, and Robertson's took the same route, both together a very rth edge of the town aided by the cavalry of Robertson and Chambliss. Our operations were here muc[8 more...]
h was gallantly met and repulsed by Colonel James B. Gordon, commanding a fragment of the Fifth North Carolina cavalry--that officer exhibiting, under my eye, individual prowess deserving special commendation. The repulse was soon after converted into a rout by Colonel Lomax's regiment, Eleventh Virginia cavalry, Jones' brigade, which now took the road, and under the gallant leadership of its Colonel, with drawn sabres, charged down the turnpike under a fearful fire of artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel Funsten behaved with conspicuous gallantry in this charge, and Captain Winthrop, a volunteer aid of Lieutenant-General Longstreet, also bore himself most gallantly. The enemy was now very near Williamsport, and this determined and vigorous attack in rear soon compelled him to raise the seige of that place and leave in hasty discomfiture by the Downsville road. His withdrawal was favored by night, which set in just as we reached the ridge overlooking Williamsport. An important auxili
ain B. S. White, C. S. A., who, though still suffering from a severe wound received at Fleetwood, accompanied the command, and his services proclaim him an officer of merit and distinction. Chief Surgeon Eliason, Captain Blackford, Engineers; Captain Cooke, Ordnance Officer; Lieutenant Dabney, Aid-de-Camp; Assistant Engineer F. G. Robertson, and Cadet Hullihen, C. S. A., and Lieutenant H. Hagan, Virginia provisional army, all performed their duties with commendable zeal and credit. Major Fitzhugh, Chief, and Captain J. M. Hanger, Assistant Quartermaster, and Major W. J. Johnson, Chief Commissary, discharged their arduous duties in their usually highly creditable manner. First Lieutenant R. B. Kennon, P. A. C. S., temporarily attached, on two different occasions was entrusted with duties attended with great peril, which he performed in a highly successful and satisfactory manner — once in testing experimentally, at night, an unknown ford on the Potomac, and again in bearing a d
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