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R. L. Dabney (search for this): chapter 9.72
pector-General, and Lieutenant G. M. Ryals, C. S. A., Provost-Marshal, deserve my special gratitude and praise. The same qualities, united to a thorough knowledge of much of the country, are ascribable to Captain B. S. White, C. S. A., who, though still suffering from a severe wound received at Fleetwood, accompanied the command, and his services proclaim him an officer of merit and distinction. Chief Surgeon Eliason, Captain Blackford, Engineers; Captain Cooke, Ordnance Officer; Lieutenant Dabney, Aid-de-Camp; Assistant Engineer F. G. Robertson, and Cadet Hullihen, C. S. A., and Lieutenant H. Hagan, Virginia provisional army, all performed their duties with commendable zeal and credit. Major Fitzhugh, Chief, and Captain J. M. Hanger, Assistant Quartermaster, and Major W. J. Johnson, Chief Commissary, discharged their arduous duties in their usually highly creditable manner. First Lieutenant R. B. Kennon, P. A. C. S., temporarily attached, on two different occasions was en
the enemy, and the Shenandoah, still high, in order to be crossed without interfering with the march of the main army, had to be forded below Front Royal. The cavalry already mentioned, early on the 23d, by a by-path reached Chester gap, passing on the army's left, and, with great difficulty and a forced march, that night bivouacked below Gaines' cross-roads, holding the Rockford road and Warrenton turnpike, on which near Amissville the enemy had accumulated a large force of cavalry. On the 24th while moving forward to find the locality of the enemy, firing was heard towards Newling's cross-roads, which was afterwards ascertained to be a portion of the enemy's artillery firing on Hill's column marching on the Richmond road. Before the cavalry could reach the scene of action, the enemy had been driven off by the infantry, and on the 25th the march was continued and the line of the Rappahannock resumed. In taking a retrospect of this campaign, it is necessary, in order to appreciat
he safety of that flank, and then follow the movement of the army. Fitz. Lee's, W. H. F. Lee's, and Jenkins' brigades, by a forced march from the vicinity of Leetown through Millwood, endeavored to reach Manassas gap, so as to hold it on the flank of the army; but it was already in possession of the enemy, and the Shenandoah, still high, in order to be crossed without interfering with the march of the main army, had to be forded below Front Royal. The cavalry already mentioned, early on the 23d, by a by-path reached Chester gap, passing on the army's left, and, with great difficulty and a forced march, that night bivouacked below Gaines' cross-roads, holding the Rockford road and Warrenton turnpike, on which near Amissville the enemy had accumulated a large force of cavalry. On the 24th while moving forward to find the locality of the enemy, firing was heard towards Newling's cross-roads, which was afterwards ascertained to be a portion of the enemy's artillery firing on Hill's col
s army, soon received our attention. A lock-gate was broken, and steps taken to intercept boats-at least a dozen were intercepted; and the next morning several, loaded with troops, negroes and stores, were captured by Colonel Wickham, Fourth Virginia cavalry, commanding rear guard. I ascertained that Hooker was on the day previous at Poolesville, and his army in motion for Frederick. I realized the importance of joining our army in Pennsylvania, and resumed the march northward early on the 28th. General Hampton was sent by Darnestown to Rockville, and the other brigades took the direct route to the same place. General Hampton encountered small parties of the enemy, which, with a number of wagons and teams, he captured, and reached Rockville in advance of the main body. The advance guard of W. H. F. Lee's brigade had a running fight with the Second New York .cavalry, but the speed of their horses deprived us of the usual results in captures. At Rockville, General Hampton encounter
e regiments were reduced to less than one hundred men; yet when my command arrived at Gettysburg, from the accessions which it received from the weak horses left to follow the command, it took its place in line of battle with a stoutness of heart and firmness of tread impressing one with the confidence of victory which was astounding, considering the hardness of the march lately endured. With an aggregate loss of about 2,200 killed, wounded and missing, including the battle of Fleetwood, June 9th, we inflicted a loss on the enemy's cavalry confessedly near 5,000. Some of the reports of subordinate commanders are herewith forwarded — others will follow — and it is hoped they will do justice to that individual prowess for which Confederate soldiery is most noted, and which the limits of personal observation, and this report, deprive me of the power of doing. Appended will be found a statement of casualties and a map; also a list of non-commissioned officers and privates whose co
June 29th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
spectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. List of inclosures. A — Report of operations of General Fitz. Lee's brigade in an engagement at Aldie, Colonel T. T. Munford commanding, and inclosing regimental reports of First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Virginia cavalry. B — Report of Brigadier-General W. E. Jones of engagement near Upperville, June 21st, 1863. C — Report of Brigadier-General William E. Jones of operations of his brigade from the 29th June, 1863, to the 14th July, 1863, inclosing regimental reports of the Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh and Twelfth Virginia cavalry. D--Brigadier-General Wade Hampton's report of the operations of his brigade in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863. E--General Order No. 74, headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, directing the retrograde movement from Gettysburg. Memoranda. Privates Benjamin F. Weller, Company E, and Robert W. Goode, Gompany G, First Virginia cavalry, as couriers at the<
August 20th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
ust, 1876, a fragment of General Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg, which we found, in his own hand writing, among his papers which Mrs. Stuart kindly turned over to us, and which was all we could obtain at the time. We are now able, through the kindness of our friend Major H. B. McClellan, of the staff of the old cavalry corps, to give our readers the full text of this important report of the great campaign.] headquarters cavalry division, army of Northery Virginia, August 20th, 1863. To Colonel R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, from the time of crossing the Rappahannock on the 16th day of June, 1863, to the 24th day of July, 1863, when, having recrossed the Blue Ridge after the Pennsylvania campaign, our pickets were reestablished on the south bank of the Rappahannock. After holding in check a cavalry force at
June 16th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
f our friend Major H. B. McClellan, of the staff of the old cavalry corps, to give our readers the full text of this important report of the great campaign.] headquarters cavalry division, army of Northery Virginia, August 20th, 1863. To Colonel R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, from the time of crossing the Rappahannock on the 16th day of June, 1863, to the 24th day of July, 1863, when, having recrossed the Blue Ridge after the Pennsylvania campaign, our pickets were reestablished on the south bank of the Rappahannock. After holding in check a cavalry force at least double our own for months, with a command stretched on the outposts from the Blue Ridge to the Chesapeake, engaging in numerous hand-to-hand encounters, illustrating the superiority of Southern cavalry, it was with joy that the order of the Commanding-General to a
June 21st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
d for the attainment of such results with such small comparative losses, I have the honor to be, Most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. List of inclosures. A — Report of operations of General Fitz. Lee's brigade in an engagement at Aldie, Colonel T. T. Munford commanding, and inclosing regimental reports of First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Virginia cavalry. B — Report of Brigadier-General W. E. Jones of engagement near Upperville, June 21st, 1863. C — Report of Brigadier-General William E. Jones of operations of his brigade from the 29th June, 1863, to the 14th July, 1863, inclosing regimental reports of the Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh and Twelfth Virginia cavalry. D--Brigadier-General Wade Hampton's report of the operations of his brigade in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863. E--General Order No. 74, headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, directing the retrograde movement from Gettysburg. Memoranda. Privat<
H. Drake, First Virginia cavalry, was mortally wounded, dying that night (16th), depriving his regiment of a brave and zealous leader and his country of one of her most patriotic defenders. The Commanding-General was very desirous of my moving at once into Loudoun a large portion of my command; but the recent rains had so swollen the Shenandoah that it was impossible to ford it, and cavalry scouting parties had to swim their horses over. In the interval of time from the 16th to the 22d of July, the enemy made a demonstration on Hedgesville, forcing back Baker's brigade. Desultory skirmishing was kept up on that front for several days with the enemy, while our infantry was engaged in tearing up the Baltimore and Ohio railroad near Martinsburg. Parts of Jones' brigade were also engaged with the enemy, in spirited conflicts, not herein referred to, resulting very creditably to our arms, near Fairfield, Pennsylvania, and on the Cavetown road from Hagerstown — the Sixth and Sevent
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