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ed gallant service, a series of charges compelling the enemy to leave the field, and abandon his purpose. I took my position that day on the York and Heidelburg roads, on the left wing of the Army of Northern Virginia. On the morning of the 3d of July, pursuant to instructions from the Commanding-General (the ground along our line of battle being totally impracticable for cavalry operations), I moved forward to a position to the left of General Ewell's left, and in advance of it, where a comomise of solid results and advantages. After dark I directed a withdrawal to the York road, as our position was so far advanced as to make it hazardous at night, on account of the proximity of the enemy's infantry. During the night of the 3d of July, the Commanding-General withdrew the main body to the ridges west of Gettysburg, and sent word to me to that effect, but his messenger missed me. I repaired to his headquarters during the latter part of the night, and received instructions as t
July 24th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
lan, of the staff of the old cavalry corps, to give our readers the full text of this important report of the great campaign.] headquarters cavalry division, army of Northery Virginia, August 20th, 1863. To Colonel R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, from the time of crossing the Rappahannock on the 16th day of June, 1863, to the 24th day of July, 1863, when, having recrossed the Blue Ridge after the Pennsylvania campaign, our pickets were reestablished on the south bank of the Rappahannock. After holding in check a cavalry force at least double our own for months, with a command stretched on the outposts from the Blue Ridge to the Chesapeake, engaging in numerous hand-to-hand encounters, illustrating the superiority of Southern cavalry, it was with joy that the order of the Commanding-General to advance was received by the cava
July 14th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
t servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. List of inclosures. A — Report of operations of General Fitz. Lee's brigade in an engagement at Aldie, Colonel T. T. Munford commanding, and inclosing regimental reports of First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Virginia cavalry. B — Report of Brigadier-General W. E. Jones of engagement near Upperville, June 21st, 1863. C — Report of Brigadier-General William E. Jones of operations of his brigade from the 29th June, 1863, to the 14th July, 1863, inclosing regimental reports of the Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh and Twelfth Virginia cavalry. D--Brigadier-General Wade Hampton's report of the operations of his brigade in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863. E--General Order No. 74, headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, directing the retrograde movement from Gettysburg. Memoranda. Privates Benjamin F. Weller, Company E, and Robert W. Goode, Gompany G, First Virginia cavalry, as couriers at these headquarters, rendere<
of the men up all night. Several flags and one piece of artillery, without a carriage, were captured here; the latter was spiked and left behind. We camped for the night a few miles beyond the town (Fitz. Lee's brigade in advance), halting the head of the column at Union Mills, midway between Westminister and Littlestown, on the Gettysburg road. It was ascertained here that night by scouts that the enemy's cavalry had reached Littlestown during the night and camped. Early next morning (June 30th) we resumed the march, direct by a cross route for Hanover, Pennsylvania--W. H, F. Lee's brigade in advance, Hampton in rear of the wagon train, and Fitz. Lee's brigade moving on the left flank between Littlestown and our road. About 10 A. M. the head of the column reached Hanover, and found a large column of cavalry passing through, going towards the gap of the mountains which I intended using. The enemy soon discovered our approach, and made a demonstration towards attacking us, which
August, 1876 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. [We published in our issue for August, 1876, a fragment of General Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg, which we found, in his own hand writing, among his papers which Mrs. Stuart kindly turned over to us, and which was all we could obtain at the time. We are now able, through the kindness of our friend Major H. B. McClellan, of the staff of the old cavalry corps, to give our readers the full text of this important report of the great campaign.] headquarters cavalry division, army of Northery Virginia, August 20th, 1863. To Colonel R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, from the time of crossing the Rappahannock on the 16th day of June, 1863, to the 24th day of July, 1863, when, having recrossed the Blue Ridge after the Pennsylvania campaign, our pickets
July 3rd, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 9.72
reports of First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Virginia cavalry. B — Report of Brigadier-General W. E. Jones of engagement near Upperville, June 21st, 1863. C — Report of Brigadier-General William E. Jones of operations of his brigade from the 29th June, 1863, to the 14th July, 1863, inclosing regimental reports of the Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh and Twelfth Virginia cavalry. D--Brigadier-General Wade Hampton's report of the operations of his brigade in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3d, 1863. E--General Order No. 74, headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, directing the retrograde movement from Gettysburg. Memoranda. Privates Benjamin F. Weller, Company E, and Robert W. Goode, Gompany G, First Virginia cavalry, as couriers at these headquarters, rendered distinguished service, exhibiting rare intelligence, great daring and heroism. My field telegraph operator, J. Thompson Quarles, was present throughout, and when no opportunity offered for practicing in his pr
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