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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 1.1
f Sink, Wednesday evening and cross the river and take the road to Mechanicsville as soon as I should be informed by General Jackson that he had crossed the Central railroad. In my written orders, it was stated that General Jackson would cross the General Jackson would cross the railroad at three o'clock Thursday morning, and allowing one hour for the transmission of the message, I was under arms and prepared to cross at 4 o'clock A. M. on Thursday. Not having received any intelligence from General Jackson, and General LeeGeneral Jackson, and General Lee's orders to me being explicit, there was no danger of my mistaking a false movement; but, after eight o'clock in the morning, I received from you a written order in these words: Wait for Jackson's notification before you move, unless I send furthern of my camp at Brooke church and masked it in the woods. At a few minutes before 10 o'clock A. M., I received from General Jackson a note informing me that the head of his column was, at the moment of his writing, crossing the Central railroad. I
t. The men reformed with great alacrity, and my commands were obeyed with the promptness, if not the precision of drill. My loss, in killed and wounded, was sixty-eight. Nothing but the thickness of the woods saved us from total destruction in our first unassisted effort upon the enemy's position. Saturday we were engaged in burying the dead. Sunday morning we crossed to the south of the Chickahominy in pursuit of the enemy. Monday we continued the pursuit until we engaged the enemy at Frazier's farm. Here my regiment joined the brigade in a series of charges upon the enemy's batteries. Without a sign of faltering, shouting the battle cry of Stonewall, which they adopted of their own accord, they advanced across two open fields in face of a perfect shower of grape and musketry, until they reached the small ravine, traversed by a fence, within a short distance of the enemy's line of battle. Taking advantage of this slight shelter, they maintained themselves in this position unt
mmand, I reached Meadow Bridge road, where I learned from stragglers that Major-General Hill had crossed the Chickahominy without opposition, with the remainder of th, did not abandon my former position. About 9 o'clock I was ordered by Major-General Hill, as soon as you see any movement on the right or left, or hear heavy muskately formed for the assault, and learning Brigadier-General Anderson, of Major-General Hill's division, had crossed the creek above the enemy's works, I was in the ailst I was placing the remainder of the brigade in position, I received from General Hill an order to move two regiments into action by the left flank and to hold the occurred until Monday afternoon about two o'clock, when I was ordered by Major-General Hill to mask my brigade in a wood to the right of the road. I remained in thabrigade in bivouac on the edge of the battlefield, and having reported to Major-General Hill through a member of my staff, was ordered to remain there until daylight,
R. H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 1.1
on the ground, and the injury inflicted was small. About eight o'clock, by order of General Lee, I occupied a piece of ground in front of Brigadier-General Archer, but finding myself strong enough to hold both, did not abandon my former position. About 9 o'clock I was ordered by Major-General Hill, as soon as you see any movement on the right or left, or hear heavy musket firing, advance also, and storm the creek. My brigade was immediately formed for the assault, and learning Brigadier-General Anderson, of Major-General Hill's division, had crossed the creek above the enemy's works, I was in the act of advancing to storm the redoubts in front of me, when I learned that the enemy had evacuated them. Crossing the creek and turning to the right through the woods, I passed Nownilly's mill and fell into the road by which the remainder of the division were pushing the enemy. On the by-road, passing Nownilly's mill, the evidence of a rout and precipitate flight were most striking. On
James H. Lane (search for this): chapter 1.1
History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. By Brigadier-General James H. Lane. No. 2. Battles around Richmond-report of Brigadier-General Branch. headquarters Fourth brigade, Light division. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major — On Tuesday, June 24th, I received orders from General Lee to take a posiBrigadier-General James H. Lane. No. 2. Battles around Richmond-report of Brigadier-General Branch. headquarters Fourth brigade, Light division. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major — On Tuesday, June 24th, I received orders from General Lee to take a position on the Chickahominy, near Half Sink, Wednesday evening and cross the river and take the road to Mechanicsville as soon as I should be informed by General Jackson that he had crossed the Central railroad. In my written orders, it was stated that General Jackson would cross the railroad at three o'clock Thursday morning, and al in killed and wounded, and about fifty missing. A list of the names having been furnished, a more precise statement in this report is not deemed necessary. Colonels Lane and Cowan, and Lieutenant-Colonels Haywood, Barbour, Hoke and Purdie, all of whom commanded their regiments during the whole or part of the week, merit especia
July, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
its action. I beg leave to say, in conclusion, that it was a week of hard fighting and hard marching with my brigade, presenting few incidents to be committed to paper. I herewith present reports from the commanders of my regiments, to which I ask the attention of the Major-General commanding the division. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, L. O'B. Branch, Brigadier-General. Report of Colonel Cowan. headquarters Eighteenth regiment N. C. Troops, near Richmond, Va., July, 1862. General — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this regiment under my command in the recent battles around Richmond. Our march across the Chickahominy, on the morning of Thursday, June 26th, and down its northern banks to Mechanicsville, having been conducted under your personal diretion, it is not necessary to refer to its incidents. We reached Mechanicsville Thursday afternoon in time to participate in the attack upon the batteries which commande
y-eight. Nothing but the thickness of the woods saved us from total destruction in our first unassisted effort upon the enemy's position. Saturday we were engaged in burying the dead. Sunday morning we crossed to the south of the Chickahominy in pursuit of the enemy. Monday we continued the pursuit until we engaged the enemy at Frazier's farm. Here my regiment joined the brigade in a series of charges upon the enemy's batteries. Without a sign of faltering, shouting the battle cry of Stonewall, which they adopted of their own accord, they advanced across two open fields in face of a perfect shower of grape and musketry, until they reached the small ravine, traversed by a fence, within a short distance of the enemy's line of battle. Taking advantage of this slight shelter, they maintained themselves in this position until the arrival of reinforcements, when they joined in the general charge which won the batteries. My loss here was very heavy-killed and wounded, one hundred and
y regiments, to which I ask the attention of the Major-General commanding the division. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, L. O'B. Branch, Brigadier-General. Report of Colonel Cowan. headquarters Eighteenth regiment N. C. Troops, near Richmond, Va., July, 1862. General — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this regiment under my command in the recent battles around Richmond. Our march across the Chickahominy, on the morning of Thursday, June 26th, and down its northern banks to Mechanicsville, having been conducted under your personal diretion, it is not necessary to refer to its incidents. We reached Mechanicsville Thursday afternoon in time to participate in the attack upon the batteries which commanded that crossing, but were not prominently engaged. Thursday night we were ordered to defend the batteries planted upon the position which had been taken from the enemy, from any attempt that might be made to retake them dur
History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. By Brigadier-General James H. Lane. No. 2. Battles around Richmond-report of Brigadier-General Branch. headquarters Fourth brigade, Light division. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major — On Tuesday, June 24th, I received orders from General Lee to take a position on the Chickahominy, near Half Sink, Wednesday evening and cross the river and take the road to Mechanicsville as soon as I should be informed by General Jackson that he had crossed the Central railroad. In my written orders, it was stated that General Jackson would cross the railroad at three o'clock Thursday morning, and allowing one hour for the transmission of the message, I was under arms and prepared to cross at 4 o'clock A. M. on Thursday. Not having received any intelligence from General Jackson, and General Lee's orders to me being explicit, there was no danger of my mistaking a false movement; but, after eight o'clock in the morning, I receive
J. Purdie. He was everywhere in the thickest of the fight — cool and courageous — encouraging the men and directing them in their duty. His services were invaluable. I desire also to make special mention of Captains Savage, Barry, McLaurin and Byrne. They were all conspicuous in the discharge of their duties, and all wounded on the field — the last three very seriously, Captain Byrne having lost an arm. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, &c., Robert H. Cowan, Colonel Commanding Ethe thickest of the fight — cool and courageous — encouraging the men and directing them in their duty. His services were invaluable. I desire also to make special mention of Captains Savage, Barry, McLaurin and Byrne. They were all conspicuous in the discharge of their duties, and all wounded on the field — the last three very seriously, Captain Byrne having lost an arm. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, &c., Robert H. Cowan, Colonel Commanding Eighteenth North Carol
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