hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. J. Hardee 426 0 Browse Search
Cleburne 334 18 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 301 1 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 278 0 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 267 1 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 182 2 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 175 31 Browse Search
J. Longstreet 148 0 Browse Search
William J. Hardee 145 1 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 143 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 67 total hits in 27 results.

1 2 3
Johnson's Island (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.14
Lieutenant Charlie Pierce's daring attempts to escape from Johnson's Island. By Lieutenant M. Mcnamara. Early in November, 1863, after General Lee had successfully driven Meade across the Rapidan back to Centreville, and retired with his entire prisoners were taken to the Old Capitol prison, where they were confined three days, when the officers were sent to Johnson's Island and the privates to Point Lookout. As soon as the captured officers reached their future prisons, the bouyancy ofopularity proved disastrous to his future operations, as he was known and constantly watched by the prison spies. Johnson's Island, it will be rembered, is three miles from Sandusky, Ohio, and about thirty miles from the Canada shore. There is, hany surprise. He was then taken before Colonel Charles W. Hill, of the 112th Ohio, then commandant of the prison at Johnson's Island, who showed himself a humane and considerate officer, and who frankly admitted the prisoner's right to attempt to es
Point Lookout, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.14
eneral Sedgwick's headquarters,. and when assembled around the camp-fire at night, surrounded by Federal pickets, Leon Bertin, by the advice of Colonel D. B. Penn, the only field officer captured, threw the flag into the flames, as the most effectual means of preventing it from falling into the enemy's hands. The following morning the prisoners were taken to the Old Capitol prison, where they were confined three days, when the officers were sent to Johnson's Island and the privates to Point Lookout. As soon as the captured officers reached their future prisons, the bouyancy of their natures asserted itself, and during the winter months every species of amusement possible was indulged in to drive away the ennui and render prison life bearable. A minstrel company was formed, of which Charlie H. Pierce was among the leading performers, and their entertainments were witnessed and appreciated by many outside as well as inside the prison, and by none more eagerly than the officers
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.14
h a chosen few, he conceived the project of scaling the parapet, attacking the sentinels with rocks, and breaking for the Canadian shore, the lake being frozen over. Scaling ladders were made as secretly as possible, and a bright moonlight night selected for the attempt. There was only one pistol obtainable, and this fell, by lot, to the possession of Lieutenant Wheeler, of Morgan's cavalry. The others armed themselves with rocks. Lieutenants Pierce, Wheeler and J. B. Bowles, of Louisville, Kentucky, were the first to get their ladders in position and attempt the ascent. Our hero, however, was the only one who gained the parapet. A rock in his hand was as true as a rifle ball, thanks to his base-ball experience. With it he felled the sentinel. His cousin, Lieutenant Bowles was shot on the ladder, and his body fell inside. His dying words to Charlie were to push on, and leave him to his fate. Lieutenant Wheeler and the sentinel in front of him fired at each other simultaneou
Centreville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.14
Lieutenant Charlie Pierce's daring attempts to escape from Johnson's Island. By Lieutenant M. Mcnamara. Early in November, 1863, after General Lee had successfully driven Meade across the Rapidan back to Centreville, and retired with his entire force south of the Rappahannock for the purpose of going into winter quarters, Hays' brigade was sent to picket the north bank at Rappahannock station. Here they were reinforced by the Louisiana Guard battery and a portion of General Hoke's North Carolina brigade. After being on duty a day, a forward movement was made by the enemy in that direction, and French's entire corps, under Sedgwick, bore down upon them. The onslaught was terrific — the enemy being ten to one--but the gallant brigade held them in check until night, when their lines were broken and they were cut off from their only pontoon bridge. The Rappahannock was at that point not fordable, and the night was intensely cold; so that their capture was inevitable. Neverthel
Sandusky, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.14
ptain and catcher, and the Confederate nine, composed of the higher officers. Their championship game was considered one of the best ever played, and was witnessed by upwards of 3,000 people, including the prisoners, officers and citizens of Sandusky, Ohio, who eagerly embraced the opportunity to be present. So apprehensive were the prison officials that the game was gotten up for the purpose of covering an attempt to break out, that they had the slides of the port holes drawn back and the guneven commanded the respect of his captors. But his notoriety and popularity proved disastrous to his future operations, as he was known and constantly watched by the prison spies. Johnson's Island, it will be rembered, is three miles from Sandusky, Ohio, and about thirty miles from the Canada shore. There is, however, a strip of land twelve miles from the prison, leading to a swamp or woods on the Canada side. The severity of the wintry season being past, the minds of many of the prisone
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.14
any surprise. He was then taken before Colonel Charles W. Hill, of the 112th Ohio, then commandant of the prison at Johnson's Island, who showed himself a humane and considerate officer, and who frankly admitted the prisoner's right to attempt to escape, complimented him on his courage and strategy, and condemned him to no other puishment than the removal of his disguises and his money, but insisted on keeping his gun, which he deemed a fit trophy to be placed among the archives of the State of Ohio, where it is at present. Charlie was then sent back to his quarters to brood in sorrow over his several failures, notwithstanding the indomitable courage, the strategy, the energy and the patience with which he prosecuted them. So confident was his comrades that he had been successful in this last attempt, that they prepared his bunk to lead the sentinel to believe that he was still there, and were ready to vouch for his sickness at roll-call the following morning. But vain hope, wh
Leon Bertin (search for this): chapter 2.14
Harry T. Hays ran the gauntlet of the pontoon bridge under an enfilading fire of the enemy. Colonel Monaghan swam his horse across the river. Colonel Terry and a few others successfully swam across, but many lost their lives in the attempt. Leon Bertin, the color-bearer of the Seventh Louisiana, tore the flag from the staff and concealed it in his bosom. In fact, everything possible was done by the gallant fellows to render their capture as barren of trophies as possible, while in point of is to record the daring and chivalric deeds of a member of the command that surrendered. The captured prisoners were marched to General Sedgwick's headquarters,. and when assembled around the camp-fire at night, surrounded by Federal pickets, Leon Bertin, by the advice of Colonel D. B. Penn, the only field officer captured, threw the flag into the flames, as the most effectual means of preventing it from falling into the enemy's hands. The following morning the prisoners were taken to the O
Lieutenant Charlie Pierce's daring attempts to escape from Johnson's Island. By Lieutenant M. Mcnamara. Early in November, 1863, after General Lee had successfully driven Meade across the Rapidan back to Centreville, and retired with his entire force south of the Rappahannock for the purpose of going into winter quarters, Hays' brigade was sent to picket the north bank at Rappahannock station. Here they were reinforced by the Louisiana Guard battery and a portion of General Hoke's North Carolina brigade. After being on duty a day, a forward movement was made by the enemy in that direction, and French's entire corps, under Sedgwick, bore down upon them. The onslaught was terrific — the enemy being ten to one--but the gallant brigade held them in check until night, when their lines were broken and they were cut off from their only pontoon bridge. The Rappahannock was at that point not fordable, and the night was intensely cold; so that their capture was inevitable. Neverthel
William R. Terry (search for this): chapter 2.14
oneted at the guns. Many of the officers threw away their swords to avoid surrendering them, and Lieutenant Charlie Pierce, of the Seventh Louisiana, broke his sword on his knee and handed the hilt to the officer — the effect of which can easily be imagined. The weapon was a highly prized one, being a trophy of the battle of Winchester. General Harry T. Hays ran the gauntlet of the pontoon bridge under an enfilading fire of the enemy. Colonel Monaghan swam his horse across the river. Colonel Terry and a few others successfully swam across, but many lost their lives in the attempt. Leon Bertin, the color-bearer of the Seventh Louisiana, tore the flag from the staff and concealed it in his bosom. In fact, everything possible was done by the gallant fellows to render their capture as barren of trophies as possible, while in point of casualties it was a dearly-bought victory for the enemy. The entire force captured numbered about fourteen hundred men, consisting of the Fifth, Six
J. A. Early (search for this): chapter 2.14
. In fact, everything possible was done by the gallant fellows to render their capture as barren of trophies as possible, while in point of casualties it was a dearly-bought victory for the enemy. The entire force captured numbered about fourteen hundred men, consisting of the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and Ninth Louisiana regiments, the Louisiana Guard battery, and about two hundred of Hoke's North Carolina brigade. The capture was witnessed from the south bank by Generals Lee and Early, who accepted it as a sacrifice that had to be made, and under its cover successfully retired the remainder of the army across the Rapidan. But the writer's mission is to record the daring and chivalric deeds of a member of the command that surrendered. The captured prisoners were marched to General Sedgwick's headquarters,. and when assembled around the camp-fire at night, surrounded by Federal pickets, Leon Bertin, by the advice of Colonel D. B. Penn, the only field officer captured, t
1 2 3